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-   -   New sailing j-22 to a Hobie wave (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/learning-sail/101177-new-sailing-j-22-hobie-wave.html)

domromer 07-08-2013 04:22 PM

New sailing j-22 to a Hobie wave
 
A few months ago I took a 5 day sailing class which included 4 days of sailing on J-22s. Just last week I moved to Florida and joined a sailing club. They have an assortment of boats including cats. Today I took out a Hobie Wave. I had a great time and managed to get to and from the dock so I'd consider that a successful first solo sail in my book.

Are there differences to keep in mind when sailing the cat vs what I learned on the J-22? I felt that tacking and jibing required a much wider turn than on the j-22 before the cat caught the wind. I'm not sure if that was me just being out of practice or something to do with the differences between the wave and the j-22.

So basically can you offer an tips for sailing a cat?

Thanks,
Dom

overbored 07-08-2013 04:46 PM

Re: New sailing j-22 to a Hobie wave
 
A Cat is harder to tack because of the resistance to turning of the two hulls. the Wave has no jib so you can't use the back wind technique but you can head up a little just before you tack so you will have to turn a smaller amount during the tack.
I watched the first America Cup races when they started to sail a Cat and even those veteran sailors did not do very well sailing or tacking a CAT

CrazyRu 07-08-2013 08:38 PM

New sailing j-22 to a Hobie wave
 
Www.catsailor.com get Rick White's videos from the site. Catamarans are different animals than ballasted monohulls.

ottos 07-09-2013 11:01 AM

Re: New sailing j-22 to a Hobie wave
 
1. Don't pinch before coming about. Bear off if necessary so you have some speed to work with.

2. Don't stall the rudders by over-steering.

3. As you come through the eye of the wind, ease out the main so that you don't weather vane. As the hulls approach the new tack(ie. close reach) , harden up the main to accelerate out.

domromer 07-09-2013 12:15 PM

Re: New sailing j-22 to a Hobie wave
 
Today I mixed it up and took out a sunfish..man those little buggers are touchy. I gotta say the cat is soooo much more comfortable than the sunfish. With the sunfish it was cool to see how a tiny change of sail trim or boat position affected your speed. The winds were nothing to extremely light today and I think the fact that I was in the sunfish helped me to catch every little bit of wind. The cats for the most part were just sitting still. That being said I still think I'd prefer lounging in the cat when the wind is dead vs being scrunched up in the sunfish.

Sal Paradise 07-09-2013 12:55 PM

Re: New sailing j-22 to a Hobie wave
 
My opinion...the sunfish sails more like a real boat. And it will go in the direction you want it to, within reason.

The Hobie is faster downwind or on a reach, but God help you if you have to go against the wind- then they are awful. I can never really get them to tack or go upwind. But they do have more room.

domromer 07-10-2013 08:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ottos:1056404
1. Don't pinch before coming about. Bear off if necessary so you have some speed to work with.

2. Don't stall the rudders by over-steering.

3. As you come through the eye of the wind, ease out the main so that you don't weather vane. As the hulls approach the new tack(ie. close reach) , harden up the main to accelerate out.

What does pinch mean?

overbored 07-10-2013 09:07 AM

Re: New sailing j-22 to a Hobie wave
 
pinching is when you are sailing up wind and you sail up to the point just before the sail starts to luff. the boat will slow slightly but will still be sailing to windward. on a Hobie Wave, if you sail the boat upwind with the mainsail in tight and maintain speed then ease the boat up to the point where the sail is just starting to luff and then tack the boat with the rudders at about 45 degrees it will be easier to tack. if the boat comes to a stop or is being blown backward then reverse the rudders and it will help you get the boat pointed onto the opposite tack. on Cats with a jib you do it a little differently and back wind the jib to help bring the bows around in a tack. Cats with only a mainsail are a lot harder to tack even more so when the wind or wave are up.

nolatom 07-10-2013 10:51 AM

Re: New sailing j-22 to a Hobie wave
 
I'm biased towards monohulls, because I love sailing upwind best. So my biased advice would be to get lots of monohull time (a J22 is an excellent choice, so are many others, including the lighter centerboard boats which are more sensitive to trim and body-weight placement). then you can decide if you are willing to give up being able to tack quickly for the extra downwind speed of a cat.

the best sailors, I think, come out of the small boats (e.g. Sunfish, Laser, Vanguard 15, 420), 'cause they're less forgiving of mistakes so the feedback is immediate rather than delayed or not apparent at all. these skills transfer well up to the slower inertia of the larger heavier boats. Vice-versa, not so much....

Good luck anyway, you're learning and asking questions, that's all good.

Cincy020 07-10-2013 12:17 PM

Re: New sailing j-22 to a Hobie wave
 
I used to have a Hobie 16 and recently sailed a Wave a couple of times while on vacation. I can say that not having the jib to backwind while tacking was much more difficult than my 16 was; I ended up sculling the rudders most of the time to get the boat to complete the tack. In my opinion, if you are looking to buy and want to stay with a catamaran, maybe look at a 16 or a Getaway both of which have jibs. The 16's are cheaper, but the Getaway doesn't have the soft spot issues, are still boomless, and have much more trampoline space.


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