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Jib vs Genoa vs Spinnaker

My understanding is:
1.Gib is the most basic kind of foresail
2.Genoa is a large jib
3.Spinnaker is a colorful genoa.

Is this correct?
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re: Jib vs Genoa vs Spinnaker

Not quite... A Jib is a 100% (or less) foretriangle headsail.. A genoa is typically a 120 to 155% foretriangle headsail. Both are set and used similarly, with jibs being deployed in heavier air, genoas lighter.

A symmetrical spinnaker is quite different. Colourful, yes.. Usually made of lighter nylon material but it is a 'flying' sail that sets ahead of the forestay usually on a pole.

Cruising spinnakers, drifters, Asails, etc more closely approximate large, light, colourful genoas.. They do not attach to the forestay like jibs and genoas, and don't usually need/use a pole, though short bowsprits are often used.

Hope that helps a bit.
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re: Jib vs Genoa vs Spinnaker

I echo Faster completely.

Practical difference in spinnakers he describes:

Symmetrical spinny = doesn't beam reach as well as asymmetrical because it is way more curved, but will sail a deep broad reach or a dead run way better since its pole pulls it laterally out of the way of the blanketing effect of the mainsail. And when you jibe it, you send someone forward and shift only the pole, and don't have to "reverse" the side of the spinny presented to the wind.

Assymmetrical ("a-sim") spinnaker: Good reacher and broad reacher, but nearly useless on a deep broad reach or a run since it is "pinned" to boat's centerline and cant be swung out from behind the dead-air behind the mainsail. It can be useful if you "wing it out" on a dead run, but requires major concentration from helmsman since the "sweet spot" is really narrow laterally. Also to jibe it, you have to "wipe" the sail over itself, lots of exercise for your trimmers. But, you dont have to send anyone out forward of the mast to jibe it.


New sailors may want to get a couple of dozen sails under their belts before trying the spinny of either type, then pick a nice 5-10 knot maximum wind to try it out. 8 knots would be perfect. Unllike mainsails or jibs, spinnakers are attached only at the corners, so are less controllable animals.
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re: Jib vs Genoa vs Spinnaker

Quote:
Originally Posted by Faster View Post
Not quite... A Jib is a 100% (or less) foretriangle headsail.. A genoa is typically a 120 to 155% foretriangle headsail. Both are set and used similarly, with jibs being deployed in heavier air, genoas lighter.

A symmetrical spinnaker is quite different. Colourful, yes.. Usually made of lighter nylon material but it is a 'flying' sail that sets ahead of the forestay usually on a pole.

Cruising spinnakers, drifters, Asails, etc more closely approximate large, light, colourful genoas.. They do not attach to the forestay like jibs and genoas, and don't usually need/use a pole, though short bowsprits are often used.

Hope that helps a bit.
Thank you. Can you please elaborate what you mean by 100% foretriangle?
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re: Jib vs Genoa vs Spinnaker

Quote:
Originally Posted by eagles_dare13 View Post
Thank you. Can you please elaborate what you mean by 100% foretriangle?
Looking at a sailplan drawing (profile of rig) triangles are formed by the mast, stays, and deck or boom.. If the 'area' of the triangle formed by rig is, say, 100 sq ft, then a 100% jib could also be 100 sq ft... a "155" could be 155 sq ft.

Here's an example, a sail plan drawing of Bob Perry's current project(hope you don't mind,Bob)



More precisely nowadays headsails are referred to by their LP measurement (luff perpendicular) as it compared to the "J" measurement. The J is the distance from the mast to the forestay attachment to the deck. If it's 10 feet then the LP of a 100% LP jib would be 10 ft... a 155 would be 15.5 ft. The means the actual area is affected by the foot angles and clew height of a particular sail's design.

LP is the dimension of a line through the clew at right angles to the luff of the sail.




More here:
Rig Dimensions
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re: Jib vs Genoa vs Spinnaker

Roughly speaking, if the jib comes back to the mast (but not past it), it is a 100% jib - it covers 100% of the space between the mast and the front of the boat (forestay). In heavier winds, you use a smaller sail - 90% is common. In lighter winds, a larger sail (which is called a Genoa, so named after the boats in Genoa, Italy, that used big foresails).

How much is heavier wind? It all depends on the boat (and other factors like your skill, and even your budget). Generally if a boat leans (heels) over too much, it makes for an exciting ride, but is less efficient and slower. So you need to control the heel, and reducing sail size is one way of doing this.

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re: Jib vs Genoa vs Spinnaker

I would respectfully wish to correct or at least clarify some points made above. The term "Jib" is a generic term for all of the triangular headsails. Genoas are a just one type of Jib, and as noted generally refers to jibs which overlap the mast. In common usage, people will often refer in short-hand to their working jib as their 'jib'. Working jibs are vary in size from less than 100% foretriangle sails (such as would be the case with a self-taking jib) to what are effectively small genoas, typically less than around 110%. Working jibs are often cut fuller than #3 genoas to give them a wider wind range.

Jeff
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re: Jib vs Genoa vs Spinnaker

Ha... now lemme confuse things more
Lapper, bigger than a "working jib" (which I had always though was less than 100%) but smaller than a genoa (usually less than a 120%).
So a 110% is a lapper.

I've heard old salts refer to working jibs as "painters" too, which struck me as odd, because I always thought that was just for a forward line...

Then there is a storm jib.
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re: Jib vs Genoa vs Spinnaker

And THEN..... many boats' sailbags will be labeled '#1 Genoa', '#1 Light', "#2 heavy" '#3 jib'... and then '1/2 0z chute', '3/4 oz chute', '1.5 oz chute'.

With jibs/genoas the #1s are the larger headsails, usually 155%(that's to do with rating penalty limits), you may have a couple of different clothweights and shaped cambers... #2s are usually the mid range sails, typically 120-130%LP... and #3s down to the working jibs, even a #4 that is a smaller jib, not quite to the storm jib situation... all with progressively heavier cloth and refined shapes for the expected conditions..

The spinnakers are different weighted cloth, and usually different designs to deal with progressively heavier wind, and/or specialized designs for reaching vs running..

In the heyday of IOR racing plenty of boats had 12 - 20 or so sails in their inventory

Sorry you asked yet???
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re: Jib vs Genoa vs Spinnaker

...and on to my favorite bit of headsail trivia - the "yankee" is a jib in the shape of an equilateral triangle (high clew). As it is symmetrical it doesn't matter which end is the head, and which the tack; in fact, it is so simple (the British sailors say) that even a yankee can raise it.

Thus the term. :-)
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