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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Learning to Sail
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  #21  
Old 01-05-2007
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Wink

I don't think Joshua Slocum was concerned about all the crap that was just mentioned in response to the initial question. Instead of debating the meaning of all these useless self serving certifications get into a friggin boat and do some sailing. Or buy a Shannon 43.
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  #22  
Old 01-05-2007
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THis is good information in evaluating boats. It is interesting and I do not want to take anything away from it. However, for those of you that are seriously thinking about cruising or going offshore, let me make a point:

The boat is a very important "Piece" of going offshore. Buy the boat you feel comfortable in and enjoy sailing (and ESPECIALLY CAN LIVE ABOARD COMFORTABLY). Buy a well made boat. HOWEVER!!! the boat is only a piece of the equation. Learning good seamanship and heavy weather techniques is MORE important than the boat. Even the Titanic will go down with bad judgement. I would take a Hunter around the world with a solid, proven crew before I would take a Valiant across the gulf with an inexperienced one.

Just my thoughts. Put the emphasis in the captain, not the boat.

Many may dissagree and that is fine. Hope you have an EPIRB.

- CD
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  #23  
Old 01-05-2007
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Exactly. Seamanship is at least 75% of it. Would "The Spray" meet any of these tests?
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  #24  
Old 01-05-2007
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Talking

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruisingdad
THis is good information in evaluating boats. It is interesting and I do not want to take anything away from it. However, for those of you that are seriously thinking about cruising or going offshore, let me make a point:

Learning good seamanship and heavy weather techniques is MORE important than the boat.
I could not agree more, not only with the part seamanship plays in the boat seaworthiness but also in the way the boat is equipped to deal with heavy weather, from sails, safety lines to the correct tensioning of the rig, not forgetting the Epirb.

Last edited by PCP; 01-05-2007 at 02:09 PM.
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  #25  
Old 01-08-2007
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I just wanted to mention that while Jeff's comments were by and large accurate and insightful, his reference to pooping in the 'cockpit' section was a bit misleading. I personally haven't found that I poop any less when I am offshore.

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  #26  
Old 02-18-2007
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I am a little confused about the STIX results of the Southerlies
How can a SOUTHERLY 110 STIX 55 AVS 151, and yet the SOUTHERLY 35RS STIX 37 AVS 160 when they are basically the same boat?
Also one would expect the 35RS to have a higher stix all things equal if the AVS was higher acn any one expalian please
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  #27  
Old 02-19-2007
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I want STRENGTH in an offshore boat. Strength to withstand a number of accidental gybes or many sudden gales in the middle of many nights. Strength to hit an object such as a container, or as we have done a floating fuel tank, and not sink the boat. Strength so that if something wraps the prop it won't pull the shaft out of the boat. Strength in terms of small ports through bolted, batteries tied down securely. I want a boat that will go upwind in force 8 winds without an engine. I REALLY want to be able to get off a lee shore in dangerous weather. I want a boat with a belowdecks rigged for safety: small open areas, secure bunks, many handholds, table bolted to the deck, fiddle bars. I want redundant equipment: more than one water tank, more than one source of electricity, more than one propane tank. I want an onboard space where I can repair broken things like water pumps. I want a watertight boat when upside down. Dodge Morgan had a companionway hatch on "American Promise"that dogged shut. I understand that. If one is thinking clearly, a proper ocean boat would not be satisfactory in inland waters. That's why they are virtually impossible to find. Andrew "Niketti" B-29/105
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  #28  
Old 02-21-2008
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How would multihulls be best evaluated, particularly since knock-downs are not well tolerated?
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  #29  
Old 02-21-2008
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While knockdowns are not tolerated well by multihulls, they have a much higher initial stability and that can often prevent the problems that lead to a knockdown or capsize in a monohull.

If you've ever seen a monohull keelboat sitting broadsides to some small waves, you'll sometimes see the boat starts rolling far more than you would expect, since the waves may be contributing to the rolling motion of the boat each time they hit it. The much higher initial stability numbers of most cruising multihulls means that they won't even start rolling at all.
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  #30  
Old 02-21-2008
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On the other hand...they do make very good kites in hurricanes!
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