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  #11  
Old 01-07-2014
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Re: Terminology: head up

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkofSeaLife View Post
Stear tastes better.
No, actually, it doesn't. The animal that is typically turned into hamburger and steaks is also spelled "steer."
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Old 01-07-2014
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Re: Terminology: head up

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Originally Posted by MarkofSeaLife View Post
Stear tastes better.
How would you know? Isn't it a crime to eat any meat but lamb, down under there?
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Old 01-07-2014
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Re: Terminology: head up

In sailing terminology, the wind is thought of as a force in much the same way as gravity. So, like gravity, 'up' is against the force and 'down' is with the force. Therefore, 'Turning down', or 'falling off' is turning away from the wind. 'Heading up' is turning towards the wind.

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Old 01-07-2014
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Re: Terminology: head up

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex W View Post
I highly recommend the book "The Complete Sailor":
Amazon.com: The Complete Sailor, Second Edition eBook: David Seidman: Kindle Store

We use this as the textbook in the teaching program at the Center for Wooden Boats in Seattle. (snip)
Thanks for the recomendation, just got it for my Kindle.

So, Alex, in your wooden boat program, do you include the "wear ship" maneuver?
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Old 01-07-2014
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Terminology: head up

"Wear Ship" actually has relevance today with modern pleasure sailboats. In very light air (e.g., <1 kt), wearing ship can be more efficient and faster than trying to tack. In the later case, getting stuck in irons is often the result.

I learned the effectiveness of wearing ship last summer in a race. The capt of the boat on which I was crewing did it with great result. Blew me away. Ya can always learn something.
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Old 01-07-2014
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Re: Terminology: head up

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Originally Posted by FSMike View Post
Actually, you would steer.
I should have caught that. I can be a dumbass when not paying attention.
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Old 01-07-2014
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Re: Terminology: head up

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Originally Posted by denverd0n View Post
No, actually, it doesn't. The animal that is typically turned into hamburger and steaks is also spelled "steer."
I rather think Mark was being humorous. Of course he and I may be the only posters with that sense of humor ----
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  #18  
Old 01-08-2014
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Re: Terminology: head up

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brewgyver View Post
Thanks for the recomendation, just got it for my Kindle.

So, Alex, in your wooden boat program, do you include the "wear ship" maneuver?
No, we are teaching on small sloops, not square rigged ships. This is what we teach on:
BLANCHARD KNOCKABOUT JR. sailboat specifications and details on sailboatdata.com

They tack and jibe just fine, even in light air. Since they are a fractional rig with a small non-overlapping jib they respond very well to backing the jib and using that to force the boat through a tack.
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Old 01-09-2014
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Re: Terminology: head up

Thought this might help.

Regards,
Brad

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Old 01-09-2014
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Re: Terminology: head up

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Originally Posted by miatapaul View Post
I have to say I do find a lot of the terminology very confusing. Once you get it down pat it becomes second nature. Then you start to understand why the terms are used. I never understood why, then when early on I was on a boat and someone said to turn right, and the answer was "your right or mine" well port/starboard really clarifies it and there is no doubt in the end. Kind of reminds me when I was resetting a password for someone and it was "Uppercase B, lowercase a, 2" and she responds "is that an upper case or lower case 2?" I thought about it, and thought better of making a snide remark as she was one of the top 25 executives at IBM and just sail lower case...

A concise unique vocabulary can be hard to learn, really almost like another language, but avoids a lot of confusion in the end.
Actually, when in steering situations aboard ships. You use left and right for directions when giving helm orders on the bridge. "left 10 degrees" "right hard over" etc. This is due to it being simple for the helmsman who are usually O/S or A/B and may not have the port starboard down yet. I could be wrong with its reason but that is what I remember from the Academy.

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