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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Learning to Sail
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  #11  
Old 08-01-2005
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dahoser is on a distinguished road
Raising sail alone

Can this really be done on a Venture 17 of the 1966 class. It is a very nice sailer but does not carry all the extra stuff. I am even adding cleets to the bow for an anchor mooring that did not come with the boat.
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  #12  
Old 08-02-2005
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Raising sail alone

Hey, Hoser,

A small Danforth''s light weight and flat profile make it the preferred choice for making your way forward along those tiny weather decks without fouling the anchor on your shrouds/lifelines. You can carry both the anchor and a <u>large</u> plastic bucket or netted bag (stows small, max airflow) full of rode and the anchor in one hand, and leave one hand for the boat.

I used a milk crate for my C22, but it took up a heck of a lot of my limited stroage below, and I needed two hands to carry it forward.
______

As for retreiving it, are you asking how to hoist the anchor on board and sail off single-handed?
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Old 08-07-2005
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dahoser is on a distinguished road
Raising sail alone

Thanks JeffC
Yes I am asking that question
Hoser
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Old 08-08-2005
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Raising sail alone

There are a couple of different ways to do this, but most of it is preference: what works effeciently considering your boat/equipment. Here''s what has worked for me:
<ol><li>Being singlehanded means being prepared: run jib sheets & make jib ready to hoist; raise mainsail, leave mainsheet slack.</li>
<li>Go forward & pull up over the anchor. If you can flake your rode into your bucket/container while heaving, all the better; or cleat it off when you''re over the anchor & take a minute to stow your line.</li>
<li>Bring the anchor line to whichever side of the foredeck you want to be your weather deck as you leave your anchorage, i.e., if you want to start off on a starboard tack, step to the right side of your foredeck. The bow will point off in the opposite direction. The more you move back and outboard, the more pronounced this nosing off will be. If you carry the rode back to the shrouds, you will be beam on to the wind: but all you need is to pivot the boat enough to be confident you''ll be pointing in the direction you want to go.</li>
<li>Dislode the anchor & get it on deck quickly. If you have time/room to grab up all your ground tackle now & dump it into the cockpit, fine; if not, just walk the anchor back to the cockpit as the boat falls away to the wind.</li>
<li>Grab the tiller, snug the mainsheet, and you''re off.</li></ol>Once you have settled on your course, you can address whatever housekeeping tasks remain: coiling/stowing anchor & rode, raising jib, etc. in the fashion you normaly perform singlehanded jobs.

I got good enough at this in my small boat to sail on and of my anchor with other boats anchored around me, without the outboard.

A bit of practice & you''ll make it look easy enough to impress everyone around you.
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Old 08-09-2005
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ultradio is on a distinguished road
Raising sail alone

Thanks for the great advise, it''s well received by this newbie (me), not only to sailing but to this board.

I''ve been out four times on my own on my little C&C 24 and so far reading the books and the wealth of information represented on sailnet has paid of. I do however, have one major problem. When I''m about to come back to my mooring I don''t know how to safely douse my genoa. I''ve tried the tiller-tamer route but for some reason the boat always goes in to a spin befor I''m done dousing, oh, and you''ve guessed right, i''m sailing/learning singlehanded.

Any advise will be greatly apprechiated!
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Old 08-10-2005
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Raising sail alone

I''m guessing a bit here but--the easiest way to solve this might be to avoid the trip forward in the first place, since it takes you away from the tiller and your weight on the bow makes it easier for her to come off course and "spin out".

Could you rig a "downhaul" line from the peak of the jib to a block on deck by the tack, then back to the cockpit? It might not require any extra hardware. Then, when you douse the jib (whether by heading up to close-hauled or by blanketing it on a run) you could sheet it in tight to leeward, cast off the halyard, pull on and then cleat the downhaul, and it should (?) come down sort of flaked along the leeward deck (lifelines, if you have them, will help keep the loose sailcloth on deck) and should stay more or less in place while you finish mooring.

You could try this, anyway, it would only require a long piece of line, a block to shackle near the tack, and a cleat somewhere aft. Then, if it works, you could refine how you lead it, what kind of line (since it would be windage when aloft), what wind angle will collapse the jib just right, etc.

If you''re going to sail singlehanded, you''ll want to start thinking about leading more stuff aft anyway, so you don''t have to leave the "office" too often.
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Old 08-10-2005
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Raising sail alone

When singlehanding and lowering my sails, I lower the jib first. To do that, I set the boat on a course about halfway between a beam reach and a beat, and trim the mainsail for that course. Then I release the jib sheet, letting the jib luff, and adjust the tiller tamer to hold that course, which it will usually do fairly easily. Most boats will self-steer pretty reliably on the mainsail alone when set up that way, giving you time to go forward and lower the jib without hurrying, and without the boat going into a spin.

Then use your mainsail to approach the mooring. If you approach the mooring using your genoa, the wind will tend to pull the bow off to leeward when you leave the tiller unattended. If you approach the mooring using your mainsail, the boat will tend more to vane into the wind when you leave the tiller unattended.
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Old 08-14-2005
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Raising sail alone

Try sailing out to give yourself some searoom under jib only--be sure you install a downhaul if you are singlehanding, they are simply a small cord attached to the hank below the headboard on your jib, that is fed back to the cockpit along the deck thru some small pulleys or sheaves.
Once you are away from shore and traffic, heave-to and tie off your tiller--let the boat settle down a bit and then slacken the mainsheet so the boom swings freely. I presume you have no topping lift--just lay the boom over the leeward rail. Go forward to the mast and feed in your sail slugs while tensioning the halyard line. once it is all the way up, keep hold of the halyard line until you crawl back into the cockpit and then harden it up.

Another way to do this is to heave-to but to have all your sail slugs above the wide slot in the mainmast and held there by a machine screw, two flatwashers and a wingnut pointed out. With the slugs all above the wide loading slot, you can simply pull on the main halyard from the cockpit and up she goes.

Take your jib across to get out of your heave-to and away you go. Do not attempt this with lazyjacks, it will likely turn into a tangled mess if there''s wind at all.

I do this on my Catalina 22 and also on my Beneteau First 345 when I am by myself.

best

maxwell
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