Hove-To w/Genoa? - SailNet Community
 
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post #1 of 8 Old 01-19-2006 Thread Starter
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Hove-To w/Genoa?

I just began to sail last summer. It may be silly but one of my favorite moments was the first time I hove-to. It''s one thing to read about a manuever like this that makes sense on paper but to actually make it happen is something else altogether.

I just bought a Tanzer 22 that''s coming with two LARGE Genoas. I was imagining what would happen if you tried to heave-to under a genoa. I''m assuming that the large sail area would make it impossible. First, I assume the fore-sail would overpower the rudder and turn the boat away from the wind. Second, I imagine you would damage the sail as it would press against the shrouds.

First - Am I right in these assumptions?
Second - If you desire to heave-to in order to take a break, eat or whatever is there a technique to do so while sailing under a genoa. Or is there another stopping technique to use as an alternative?

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peter
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post #2 of 8 Old 01-19-2006
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Hove-To w/Genoa?

You''ve thought this through and are probably right on both counts. For the "storm" heaving-to, you probably want much less sail area than a large genny, so a smaller working jib or even a storm jib would be good to carry if you''re going cruising. Even if you could get the backed genny to balance somehow, it''d put an unneeded strain on your windward shrouds and spreaders and may chafe the sail to death. Maybe you can get a roller-furling arrangement where you just leave a "handkerchief" of the genny showing. As with all heave-to''s, you have to experiment with main, traveller, tiller, and jib settings to get the balance.

Then there''s the "just hanging around jogging in place" heaving-to in fair weather, while you''re having lunch, figuring out a chart, or whatever, or just because you like it. There, you just might get the genoa to work, at least in light air if you bring the main in more and put the tiller more to leeward, and the chafe wouldn''t be too bad if you don''t do it for long periods. If not, then you''re right, the genny may simply pull your center of effort too far forward for the main and tiller to overcome it and keep you on course. That''s why a roller furling arrangement might work in light air even if it doesn''t in heavy air, you can reduce the jib area as much or as little as needed for balance.

Other than heaving to, the only other stopping techniques I know of are luffing, anchoring, or just sails-down drifting, but none of these will keep you on a desired course.

Best of luck in your sailing and your new boat.
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post #3 of 8 Old 01-23-2006 Thread Starter
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Hove-To w/Genoa?

Nolatom,

As I suspected. Thanks for the reply.

p
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post #4 of 8 Old 01-29-2006
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Hove-To w/Genoa?

I did hove to once with a genoa in very light air situations. It did, of course push agianst the shrouds, but it really did not chafe as the wind was so light. It worked great. We broke out the berrs and played a game of hearts out in the cockpit while enjoying the summer air and calm seas. I don''t think I would normally do this, but in light air, it will work- and it probably is not the best treatment of your genoa.

Another option for lunch is fore reaching which I had never heard of before reading about it in the December Cruising World. It is a storm tactic, but looks like it should work for lunch. You furl the jib and go under main alone. You sheet the main centerline and lock the helm midship. If the boat falls off, you set the helm more to windward or the opposite if it starts to come through the wind. The article''s author say they used it for 36 hours in winds gusting over 50 kts.
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post #5 of 8 Old 01-31-2006 Thread Starter
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Hove-To w/Genoa?

That sounds interesting. It seems like the boat would want to constantly head up into irons but I''ll certainly give it a try.

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post #6 of 8 Old 02-01-2006
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Hove-To w/Genoa?

Remember that under these conditions the genoa will be stretched out across the rigging. In light air you will not get much chafe, but still, it is not the best thing to do to your sail.
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post #7 of 8 Old 02-11-2006
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Peter.

As long as you are carrying a foresail whose size is suitable for the wind strength, and have the mainsail reduced accordingly, you should be able to hove-to regardless of the wind stength.

As the breeze goes up, and the sail area goes down, the same principles still work. As to chafe, I'd not worry unless you wanted to spend many hours hove-to,, in which case its a consideration. Even there ist all sort of works out, as if hove-to in the strongest winds, with a storm jib and a deep reef, there's nothing much to chafe.
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post #8 of 8 Old 02-11-2006
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Peter
RE:" I''m assuming that the large sail area would make it impossible. First, I assume the fore-sail would overpower the rudder and turn the boat away from the wind...."
One other detail, its not the rudder that balances against the turning force of the backed jib, its the mainsail ,trimmed somewhat tight to centerline, that provides balance...as the jib tries to turn the boat to leeward, the main is forcing it to windward..
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