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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Learning to Sail
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  #1  
Old 08-02-2006
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Talking Looking for sailing classes

Hi all,

I'm a newbie, as I mentioned in my earlier thread.
I live in Portland Oregon, and was wondering if there are any sailing schools out there that are free or affordable.

I know in Canada the YMCA has a club in Vancouver which offers a week sailing camp at a very affordable price. However, here in Portland I have no idea where to even start.

Any ideas out there!!!!

Thank you,

Praxi
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Old 08-02-2006
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sailing schools

One thought,fly down to S.F. Bay,spend a week in a sailing school,if you can sail S.F. Bay then you can sail anywhere!! I know some school offer to stay on a boat while in school, try looking for Modern Sailing great school.
Before looking for free spend some money into proper training through a GOOD school,then decide what your future is.
Thomas
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  #3  
Old 08-02-2006
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sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
BTW, I'd do the training and get some sailing in before looking for a boat. I'd highly recommend that you do at least the equivalent of a ASA Coastal Crusing certification course.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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Old 08-03-2006
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Sailormon6 will become famous soon enough
Sailing speaks in a language that's foreign to most people, and, on the first half day of most entry level sailing courses, the instructor teaches you the meanings of words and phrases that you must know. If you already have a basic understanding of those words and phrases before you go to your first class, you'll understand much more of what you are being taught.

The Coast Guard Auxiliary, the US Power Squadron, the YMCA and many other organizations teach basic sailing courses that are very inexpensive, but that will introduce you to the language of sailing and to the basic principles of sailing. I suggest you take one of those courses before you enroll in the more expensive courses at a commercial school. If you already have a knowledge of the language of sailing and an understanding of the basic principles, you'll get much more benefit out of the commercial school course.
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Old 08-03-2006
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I'd also recommend reading a basic "Learn to Sail" book, like Seidman's The Complete Sailor.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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Old 08-21-2006
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Depends

What type of sailing do you want to be doing. If you are into dingy sailing you could go to the Willamette Sailing Club just south of downtown. If you think you want to get into larger boats there are a number of places along the columbia that give lessons.
The cheapest way I know how to learn to sail is to read up as much as you can to get the terminology down and general basics and then go down to one of the clubs on racing night and see if you can get on as crew of one of the boats. Be honest and let the skipper know that you have little or no experience. I'm sure someone needs some rail meat.
Race night for Willamette Sailing Club, two or more person boats, is Wednesday nights. That includes Thistles, DaySailers, Lidos, snipes, Vanguards, Tasers and a few other various craft. I don't know when the others do theirs.

Last edited by PDuckX; 08-23-2006 at 03:37 PM.
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Old 08-24-2006
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Sorry, don't mean to jump on you, but we do get awfully suspicious of people advertising any product strongly, especially if the website is "under construction" and it is their first post.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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Old 08-24-2006
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When looking for a sail school, or a sail club for that matter, look at the condition of the boats. That is an excellent indicator as to how serious the organization is regarding their dedication to sailing and sailors.

I have been with my San Diego sail club for 9 yrs now. Just putted around for the most part, but finally got serious and took my coastal nav and bareboat this past month. Bareboat was a great experience and I learned alot in 2 days at sea. It also solidified what i'd learned in the past.

As to nav? It gave me a headache, lol....but is a vital tool when cruising, which is what i plan to do. Since anything can happen to a gps unit, nav skills can save your boat and your life. Don't ignore it.

good luck and fair winds
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