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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Learning to Sail
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  #11  
Old 10-06-2006
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One more thing to worry about:

http://www.sfsailing.com/cgi-bin/for...13&thread=1045

http://www.veromarine.co.nz/dirvz/ma...otofeature0007


Last edited by GoLikeaFish; 10-06-2006 at 12:23 AM.
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  #12  
Old 10-06-2006
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Interesting articles, but for the most part I don't think that shipping containers are all that big a danger, unless you're in a major shipping channel or in an area where the containers will tend to gather.

Most shipping containers, IMHO that are washed off deck are damaged by the drop into the ocean, and probably fill rather quickly, not over the 57-183 days that it might take on a worst case basis. Most containers that do go overboard are either from being washed overboard by a storm or from falling overboard, due to bad stowage. In either case, given the distance that the container will fall, it seems unlikely that it would retain its integrity.

The real danger from them is when they have a relatively lightweight but fragile cargo that has large foam blocks as part of the shipping packaging. LCD TVs come to mind.

A recent story from last year mentioned stuffed animals washing up all along the British coastlines. Apparently, a container of the toys had been lost from a ship during a storm. The animals were washed out of the container, after it broke open and they were finding them everywhere. If a container with stuffed animals, which aren't a heavy cargo, washed overboard and was damaged to the point that the toys were released to the sea, what is the likelihood of a cargo full of heavier, more substantial items, surviving intact. I don't see shifting stuffed animals as having the ability to damage a container from within, which is not true of heavier cargos.
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Last edited by sailingdog; 10-06-2006 at 05:46 AM.
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  #13  
Old 10-06-2006
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Be careful of The Rules

If you are adrift, night or day, you are underway but not making way. By law, vessels restricted in their ability to maneuver, vessels fishing commercially, vessels not under command and sailing vessels all have right of way over you and in that order. If they hit you, you will probably share the responsibility.

Also, by law, if in restricted visibility (that would include night) you must sound two prolonged sound signals at least every two minutes.

I don't singlehand at night anymore because in the Chesapeake, there are an estimated 100 trillion crab pots and a billion unlit fish stakes even in 25 feet of water. But when I used to sail the Great Lakes, I set the sails, set the autohelm, took a look around, set kitchen timer for 5 minutes and went for a cat nap (a clear violation of rule 5)
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Old 10-06-2006
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Surfesq, there certainly are no shortages of opinion and fact! One thing I always note about the sailnet community is most replies are rooted in common sense, most!
My years offshore with the boat have taught me well, they taught me that being up 16 feet up on deck above the big blue is alot different than looking out over the cabin with a soon to poop cockpit! Steep swells that we didnt pay much attention too now determine our course. I have sailed offshore with a friends boat, we took watches at night, a little unnerving but I was fine with it by the third day.
I do not have many upgrades to make to our s/v but radar will be one of them when I put her in our bay here.
Thanks everyone, Tony
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Old 10-17-2006
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solo

i love solo sailing. but i'm out 4-8 hours and return to the same belmont harbor chicago. less worry about inexperienced crew.i love the solitude
it's easy on my c & c mirage 24. it gets hairy often but i always wear my inflatable jacket with hooked on radio, and i never get on deck without being hooked on.
we also have a 22 southcoast in ft myers beach fl for the winter. i'm retired chicago fire dept and are rv snowbirds.

jon/laura olsen
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Old 10-17-2006
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Really good advice in this thread.

I've been singlehanding my Hardin 45 ketch for years, and at 62 years, I move about the same way the boat does, slow and easy. According to my log, I spend about 150 days a year on overnights in the CA Channel Islands. Just about all of that singlehanding.

Night sailing isn't just something you say lets take off, you've got to be prepared. Try going out around the harbor, outside the breakwater, a few miles off. Learn to distinguish the lights and landmarks which can be very confusing. A second thing is equipment. Make sure, if possible, that all control lines run to the cockpit so there's lessened possibility that you'll have to go forward leaving the safety of the cockpit. Roller furling, strobe on lifejackets, remote anchor switch, tethers, jack lines, etc., all expensive but well worth the cost.

I have two radars, 24 mile mounted below, and a 16 mile with screen on deck. I set guards on both with the 24 set at 4 miles and the 16 at 8. I figure because of the stronger power of the 24, it'll pick up targets that the 16 won't. Both have speaker alarms with 20 ft of wire from the unit to the speaker. I've found that radar is one of the best pieces of equipment I have.

And yes, the coast guard requires a helmsman and a lookout, and they can't be the same person, so singlehanding is technically illegal, although not enforced to my knowledge other than following an incident.

Heaving-to is a great way to await morning before going into an unfamiliar port, or when you have a big fish on the line. It may take a little practice to do it right, I still get confused where to put the helm when the headsail is backed.

I'm sure you'll add or subtract to all the advice as you get out and do it.
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Old 10-17-2006
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"And yes, the coast guard requires a helmsman and a lookout, and they can't be the same person, so singlehanding is technically illegal, although not enforced to my knowledge other than following an incident."

In the abstract sense, no, the USCG does not require that. Perhaps for *commercial vessels* but understand that the requirements for commercial and recreational vessels are quite different in many ways.

You can download a complete & current copy of COLREGS from the USCG and other web sites. There's no requirement for recreational vessels to keep a separate helmsman, there or elsewhere.
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Old 10-18-2006
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Thumbs up I break both rules

I have long been a solo diver. Simply put, few people are willing to dive as I do. I settle down in the coral heads, slow my breathing, relax and get very still. THEN THE SHOW BEGINS!! I will sit there for a full tank watching what few of you who insist upon dashing about have never seen, nor will you.

And I sail alone as well. But I do it by sleeping in the cockpit in catnaps. Sleeping below is an inport luxury, period.

Putting it all into perspective..... you are making what 3, 4 knots? So in a 10 minute, or even a 20 minute catnap you will have gone how far? Far less than a nautical mile? And your visibility is what? Far more than a nautical mile? So exactly how much can happen in ten minutes?

I have done this for years, including those early days sailing with my Granda when I lived aboard with him on his 45 foot Dutch leeboard schooner, (16" draft!! Florida Keys). He taught me to sleep in that quite refreshing short spurts which leaves you quite ready to react quickly when needed.

It takes time to accustom yourself to cat napping, but I have taught it to others and once accustomed, you will find your life suddenly changed forever because you suddenly will seem to have twice as much time to do everything...including sailing. Oh... I have also catnapped sitting on the bottom as well.
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Old 10-18-2006
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I am not sure if I can able to survive with just catnapped 15 to 20 minutes at a time. I certainly will try to do this on land before I venture out. For those who can’t survive with just catnapped, will you feel comfortable if you only rely on radar with an alarm? I would think that if I hook to the jackline, sleep in the cockpit and set my time to wake me up every 2 hours will be sufficient. Your input, please.
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Old 10-18-2006
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It's going to depend on exactly where you are. In busy shipping lanes this could be suicide and even outside the shipping lanes a tad risky. It's said that modern commercial shipping can go from over the horizon to joining you for a quick cup of tea in the cockpit in approx 15 minutes. Remember that those suckers are travelling at something in the order of 30 knots. Reality is , however, that in the middle of the Pacific Ocean one might judge the risk to be slight.

[/QUOTE] I would think that if I hook to the jackline, sleep in the cockpit and set my time to wake me up every 2 hours will be sufficient. Your input, please.[/QUOTE]
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