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Hargadoo 10-19-2006 02:38 PM

Help: How do I rig up my spinnaker?
 
I have an Aloha 27 and it came with a spinnaker and pole. I've never used the spinnaker since owning the boat (5 months ago) and I'm quite new to sailing.
Where does the pole go?
what line/s do I attach to the spinnaker?
If anyone has an Aloha, can you take pictures of how you rigged up your spinnaker please?
Thanks.

Faster 10-19-2006 03:03 PM

OK, here goes.


You should have a ring on the front of your mast, either fixed about 5 feet off the deck, or on a sliding track. One end of the pole attaches to that. Make sure that you hang the pole on its pin, don't hook the end over the ring.

Part way upthe mast will be the pole lift, it attaches to the top bridle or ring once the pole is attached to the mast. The downhaul, run through blocks on the deck, attach to the lower bridle. Since this is a high load function, it really should have a full bridle, not a pole mounted ring.

The line that is going to be the the "guy" passes through the other end of the pole, around the forestay and then clips to the "tack" of the spinnaker. Do not clip the pole to the spinnaker. The other line, the sheet simply goes the the other corner, now the clew.

Attach the halyard and you're good to go. You can hoist for just aft of the bow on the leeward side, or from the pulpit. Some boats are rigged to hoist from the companionway but genoas get in the way of this.

There is obviously lots more to all of this, suggest you find some racing how-to books, or perhaps the Harken catalogues for diagrams and set up details.

Good luck

nolatom 10-19-2006 07:45 PM

Practice in light air first. Bring someone along who knows how to fly a kite, will be worth more than his/her weight in beer.

launch and lower the spinnaker from the leeward side, on a broad reach, in the blanket of the mainsail.

Once you get the hang of it, you just might like it for cruising. On a light air run, it's hot, boring and slow with just the main and a limp jib in its shadow. A spinnaker, slightly overtrimmed, can make that leg of your trip fast enough to keep you away from using the engine, and make it more interesting. Just be sure to get it down before any bad weather reaches you.

Faster 10-19-2006 08:07 PM

nolatom, good points all - I would only caution against trying to fly the kite in TOO light air - that can be an exercise in frustration.

Bringing a coach along the first time or two is a great idea, also have your regular crew along at the same time so that everyones on the same page during gybes, sets and takedowns.

The Aloha 27 is a great boat to learn on as the fractional rig keeps the kite an easily manageable size.

chrondi 10-23-2006 10:18 AM

Just three things to remember, above all:
Bring someone experienced on board and practice extensively all movements under different wind and possible point of sail conditions before you decide you no more need his services.
Define port and starboard clews beforehand; spinnaker pole is always extended to windward.
Retrieve the spinnaker behind (leeward) the main sail, pulling quickly and letting go down the cabin, where you can sort the bits and pieces afterwards.

PS: Symmetrical spinnakers need constant trimming and balancing, while asymmetricals and gennakers are much easier and safer!

Faster 10-23-2006 10:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chrondi
PS: Symmetrical spinnakers need constant trimming and balancing, while asymmetricals and ginnakers are much easier and safer!

Possibly true, but asymmetricals are far less versatile and cannot be used nearly as deep as a conventional symmetrical chute. True, they require less hardware and so are overall less expensive to set up for, but for all around performance and efficiency I'd go with the symmetrical.

Ideally, carry both types, use the appropriate sail for the conditions and/or the number/experience of crew on board.

sailingdog 10-23-2006 12:06 PM

Unless you are racing, there really isn't a big need for a full symmetrical spinnaker. Most cruising sailors use an asym or gennaker for simplicity's sake.

nolatom 10-23-2006 02:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sailingdog
Unless you are racing, there really isn't a big need for a full symmetrical spinnaker. Most cruising sailors use an asym or gennaker for simplicity's sake.

Generally agree, except dead downwind in light air. If you have a long cruising leg like that, the old-school spinnaker will pull you straight downwind much better than the assyms, which are good on broad reaches but too much blanketed by the main (like any jib) on a run. And once you get it flying, it's actually simpler than trying to run wing & wing with a jib. You could zig-zag downwind with the gennaker, but now you have a lot more jibing and chart work to do if you're doing DR plotting and "naviguessing"

Besides, the questioner already has a symmetrical spinnaker, and wouldn't have a bowsprit for an assym.

sailingdog 10-23-2006 02:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nolatom
Generally agree, except dead downwind in light air. If you have a long cruising leg like that, the old-school spinnaker will pull you straight downwind much better than the assyms, which are good on broad reaches but too much blanketed by the main (like any jib) on a run. And once you get it flying, it's actually simpler than trying to run wing & wing with a jib. You could zig-zag downwind with the gennaker, but now you have a lot more jibing and chart work to do if you're doing DR plotting and "naviguessing"

Besides, the questioner already has a symmetrical spinnaker, and wouldn't have a bowsprit for an assym.

True, but on my boat, which does have a bowsprit for my screacher sail, and is generally more efficient on a broad reach than a DDW run, the screacher works quite well. This is generally true of alot of multihulls...

I was just mentioning that most non-racers, especially ones who are sailing with a minimal crew, often find the asyms much more conducive to being used often. The efficiency of a symmetrical spinnaker is not worth much if you're finding it too much work to make it worthwhile to hoist and fly. :rolleyes:

Faster 10-23-2006 04:26 PM

" The efficiency of a symmetrical spinnaker is not worth much if you're finding it too much work to make it worthwhile to hoist and fly. "

SD - what about the feeling of satisfaction that comes from a good downwind leg sailing deep, accomplishing a couple of gybes without disaster? We find it very rewarding at the end of a good spinnaker run, even, and maybe especially, when cruising.

Where we sail the wind tends to follow geographical terrain, so we often end up either beating or running. A long day downwind reaching can be shortened up considerably sailing deeper. Here we "need" the symm sail.


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