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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Learning to Sail
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  #11  
Old 01-23-2007
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I prefer the "quick stop" method when possible, it's the second method on the US Sailing page I've attached. If you watch the video you'll see it looks like they are gonna run the victim down as Sailormon mentioned. I also carry a floating line in a throw bag that's readily available on the rail which can be thrown pretty quick and will trail around to the victims back like picking up a waterskier if you turn quick enough.
http://www.sailingusa.info/man_over_board.htm

Last edited by capttb; 01-23-2007 at 12:38 PM.
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  #12  
Old 01-23-2007
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I worked on a 100ft charter boat for the last 3 years or so and we had a procedure that we practiced regularly. Someone would toss a buoy over at random that had several large buckets attatched to it. This is from a crews perspective.

Whoever spots the MOB point and hollar and notify skipper/captain "man overboard, off the stbd/port side appx X meters back" (now everyone knows where MOB is). IMPORTANT, Never take your eye or pointer off the MOB as they are easy to lose sight of at night, rain, or waves. While doing this you and other crew must make sure no "brave souls" jump in after the MOB because then your problems have doubled. You or nearest person should then toss the throw ring, bag, or any float to the person. Then Confirm with the skipper/captain that they have a visual so they may plan the approach. Once the skipper/captain knows where the MOB is you may head to the planed boarding location of the particular vessel with your extended wisker pole and be ready to scood the MOB up.

Now I know the procedure would be different for a sailboat unless you decided to fire up the motor and drop sail, however the procedure of spotting, tossing floats, and notifying skipper/captain are very important as well as MAINTAING A VISUAL.

Sailingdog - its funny that you say MOB's are usually not able to assist because I had one captain that stressed how ugly it could get. He even said that if necessary we should knock them out so that they don't drag us in with them. I don't know about knocking someone out but people sure do get desperate in cold water.
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  #13  
Old 01-23-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RayMetz100
We threw out a lifejacket tied to a bumper and began our drill.
All good advice Ray, but please - when referring to fenders, refrain from using the "b" word. Sorry - just a pet peeve of mine.
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  #14  
Old 01-23-2007
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Ray,

Very "refreshing" to see you running MOB drills, don't forget fire drills as well, with every class of fire. Found this link, courtesy of the New Zealand CG,
"food for thought".

http://www.boatingsafety.com/nzcg/pleasure.html
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  #15  
Old 01-23-2007
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Man/crew overboard

How wonderful that someone's thinking about and practicing a recovery -- and is honest and caring enough to report problems! That's step 1 in addressing an issue that most people prefer to wish away.

Here are two suggestions based on lots of study, lots of tests, and lots of talking with people who've gone through a real emergency:

1. During practice, a life jacket or cushion in the water will blow with the wind faster than a human body. For a more realistic simulation, attach a drogue (small parachute) or counterweight (maybe a coffee cup will do).

2. For a report on the most thorough tests I know, go to either of these links:

BoatUS.com/Foundation
USSailing.org/Safety


and click on COB Final Report.

I wrote it, but all the work was done by the testers during four days of trials on SF Bay -- 400 tests in monohulls, multihulls, and powerboats from 23-54 feet. There are lots of hard facts and informed opinions on maneuvers (several choices), ladders (they don't always work), boarding platforms (problematic), throwbags (great idea), Lifeslings (another great idea), emergency lights (many recent improvements), and COB alarm systems (improving).

The report's in the public domain. Anybody can use or distribute it in any way so long as it's constructive. Any questions? Let me know.

John Rousmaniere

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  #16  
Old 01-24-2007
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Quick Stop

I'd like to second the "Quick Stop" method referred to above. We participated in a Storm Trysail Club MOB seminar for Junior Sailors at Larchmont YC several years ago. Essentially, the method calls for the boat to tack IMMEDIATELY, all standing, and get back to the victim, while the crew works to get the jib or other foresail down. (Boats are simpler to maneuver with just the main up, and the victim is easier to see and approach with no foresail up. Our J/36 was fully crewed with 14 to 17 year-olds when we tried it for the first time with the spinnaker up in about 18 knots of wind. We were going about 10 knots when I threw over the cushion. The 16 year-old helmsman threw the helm over, and we tacked. The spinnaker draped itself back against the forestay and shrouds as the boat slowed and turned. The crew got it down, and we had the boat back at the "victim" in less than a minute. The biggest problem we had was getting these dinghy sailors to realize that a 10 ton boat doesn't just stop when you luff, the way a dinghy does. We zipped by that cushion two or three times at 5 knots until he got the hang of it. Subsequent returns were even quicker, despite "losing someone" in the middle of headsail changes and spinnaker jybes. Getting the different helmsmen used to the momentum, speeds and distances in an unfamiliar boat was the issue. It was also rough enough that the ladder, mounted on the transom, would have been a dangerous limb-breaker if it had been used. Having a tackle/harness system that ACTUALLY WORKS is imperative if you expect to get someone back aboard quickly.
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  #17  
Old 01-25-2007
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sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice
Most lost overboard are permanently lost due to loss of visual contact. In any type of seaway it is scary how far you CAN'T see. To illustrate, have a crew member toss a floating object overboard, wait 15 seconds, and then call out MOB. In any significant seaway you'll never see the object. Kind of makes one reconsider that stylish black foul weather gear. International orange does seem to show up the best. Tossing other floating items over-board, immediately, does have merit although drift characteristics will vary widely. The single most important factor is CONTINUOUS visual contact with the MOB. If crewing allows, one person should be delegated this duty, without relief, and with absolutely no other duties until such time as multiple crew members have visual sight of MOB close aboard.
The tragic irony to such situations is that the MOB can see the vessel quite well, but all the yelling and waving in the world does not make them any more visible.
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  #18  
Old 01-25-2007
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sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
A better example of how difficult it is to see an MOB is toss a coconut overboard an look for it... It is about the size of a human head and about as easy to spot... which is to say almost impossible. Wearing bright colors, red, orange, yellow, chartreuse, will help a lot. People who buy foul weather gear in blue, green, black or white are just asking to become statistics.
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  #19  
Old 01-25-2007
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COB/MOB Visibility

The quick stop is my favorite go-to maneuver, too. But if the SF Bay tests summarized in the COB Symposium Final Report and other experiences show anything, it's that different boats -- heavy, light, multis, monos -- can require different maneuvers. The points on visibility are 1000% correct. Below is a photo taken one flat day. Even at less than 50 yards, if the swimmer weren't wearing the yellow helmet, if there were no objects behind him, and if nobody was pointing at him -- all that and you wouldn't know he's there.

Man overboard-copy-victim-100-yards-rousmaniere.-lowres.jpg
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  #20  
Old 01-25-2007
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I keep thinking it would be useful to do MOB drills using greased watermelons to give an idea of the difficulty of seeing someone AND the difficulty of getting them back aboard. Speedy recovery would provide the benefit of a less waterlogged dessert prize.
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