I did my first solo sail. - Page 3 - SailNet Community
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post #21 of 39 Old 02-10-2007
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I did my first Solo in a non-dinghy or Hobie on SF Bay for Sausalito. I was blowing about 15-20 while I was preping so I reefed the main. By the time I halfway down the chanel things calmed down to 5 or less so I release the reefing and put on a harness to go foward to hank on the jib. I put the hareness back on when I took things down.
NEVER..NEVER let anyone talk you into being less safe than you feel comfortable with. It is not the risk factor it is the fun factor. Take the risk in a non life threatening way!~
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post #22 of 39 Old 02-10-2007
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oops. igore the spelling. I need to switch to firefox!
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post #23 of 39 Old 02-10-2007 Thread Starter
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good tips. I don't have a harness yet and on a Catalina 22 I don't think the line could be short or tight enough to keep me out of the water. That doesn't mean I shouldn't seriously consider wearing one though. Since that boat is so light, I'm sure it would nearly stop if it was dragging me off the side. If I yanked on the rope or grabbed a rail with no one else in it, it should tip pretty good enough for me to grab more.

I don't have to figure it out while writing this though, I'll just keep sailing and learning. I think they have a harness in the lifejacket closet at my club. I'm sure they'd be happy to loan it to me.
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post #24 of 39 Old 02-11-2007
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It depends.. if you're hooked on to the windward jackline, even a 6' harness would keep you on the boat if you fell to leeward... Doesn't do much good if your clumsy enough to fall off of the high side of the boat though. The PFDs with integrated harnesses can be much more comfortable than a separate harness and PFD. I use a Spinlock Deckware Pro harness/PFD.

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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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post #25 of 39 Old 03-15-2007
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rayMetz...

For what's it worth... cause I'm not a sailor... but it sounded like yu did a great job... were the boats so close... you could barely get through? In our slips... were suppose to have more room... I hope we do...
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post #26 of 39 Old 03-15-2007
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You inspired me to get out there and try it alone.
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post #27 of 39 Old 03-15-2007
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Fair winds RamblinRose... And enjoy...

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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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post #28 of 39 Old 03-18-2007
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Good on ya, Rose. Most of us essentially single hand, whether we have others on board or not. Single handing will refine one's skills and illuminate deficiencies in both boat and master that can be corrected. That makes the vessel and her master more capable and safer, no matter the number of persons on board.
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post #29 of 39 Old 03-19-2007
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There is a difference between taking a risk and a calculated risk. The latter is a result of judgment gained by experience and expertise, the former is the folly of inexperience or suicidal tendacies. While a new boat owner, I have spent enough time on the water to respect it. Taking a chance when it is neccesary IS important. But safety is something that should be a habit. I spent almost 7 years as a soldier - my job was knowing the difference between risk and reward. My advice - be safe, be smart. Good habits will not earn you the ridicule or contempt of a smart sailor. If nothing else, if you are singlehanding and go over - who is going to run the MOB drill? Or do you intend on picking your boat up on some far shore downwind?????
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post #30 of 39 Old 03-19-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by longwaterline
Cam

In the situation you mention a better bet might be a wet suit and life jacket. I assume you are concerned about hyperthermia.
One other concern is that if you do fall in, the temperature of the water can cause you to suffer a heart attack... which might easily be avoided by not falling in the water in the first place. This is especially true in the more northerly areas, such as the one I sail. I would prefer to avoid being in the water at all... staying dry goes a long way to staying rational, coherent, comfortable, healthy and alive.

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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
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Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.

Last edited by sailingdog; 03-19-2007 at 12:21 AM.
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