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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Learning to Sail
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  #21  
Old 08-30-2007
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However, depending on the design of the boat, it may not swing if it is anchored from the stern. YMMV.
Quote:
Originally Posted by TrueBlue View Post
Your stern lacks an anchor pulpit and roller, there's no windlass and most likely improper cleat size/backers and chocks to carry the increased loads which created the swinging problem in the first place.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
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—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #22  
Old 08-30-2007
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I like Lancer28's solution.

I would tie a docking line to the anchor rode just outside the lifeline. Use a rolling hitch .http://www.animatedknots.com/rolling...ting/index.phpThen I would take the docking line back, outside the lifelines, and run it through a winch. I would then slowly let out some additional anchor rode, until the boat stops swinging. I imagine at this point it would look much like Lancer28's diagram.

Realize that you will have more aerodynamic drag, and therefore put more strain on your ground tackle. Make sure that it is up to the task.

When it comes time to depart, simply release the line through the winch, take in the anchor line to the knot. Untie and stow the dock line, then retreive the anchor.

Note that I have not tried this YMMV and all the usual disclaimers apply

Ed
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  #23  
Old 08-30-2007
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Already mentioned that back in post #3...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lancer28 View Post
ok so how about anchoring from the front with a line attached to the anchor rode on a block and I can attach to the aft of the boat and pull it in to "lean" the rode to one direction?

Will this help? See drawing.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #24  
Old 08-30-2007
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Ed-

While this will present more drag, it may actually put less strain on the ground tackle than your boat would if it was sailing from side-to-side as there isn't the shock loading that occurs when the boat gets to one ed of the swing... also, the force on the rode and anchor would be a steady constant force, rather than one varying and changing in direction constantly.
Quote:
Originally Posted by eherlihy View Post
I like Lancer28's solution.

I would tie a docking line to the anchor rode just outside the lifeline. Use a rolling hitch .http://www.animatedknots.com/rolling...ting/index.phpThen I would take the docking line back, outside the lifelines, and run it through a winch. I would then slowly let out some additional anchor rode, until the boat stops swinging. I imagine at this point it would look much like Lancer28's diagram.

Realize that you will have more aerodynamic drag, and therefore put more strain on your ground tackle. Make sure that it is up to the task.

When it comes time to depart, simply release the line through the winch, take in the anchor line to the knot. Untie and stow the dock line, then retreive the anchor.

Note that I have not tried this YMMV and all the usual disclaimers apply

Ed
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #25  
Old 08-30-2007
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'Dog - good point!
I forgot about the potential shock load from the swinging. It would seem that if the tackle can handle that, it should handle the increased drag.... But as you pointed out earlier;
Quote:
Erring on the side of heavier with your ground tackle is rarely a mistake.
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I had a chance to re-measure my chain and nylon today when I was installing new distance markers.

I actually have 400' of nylon 3 strand and 12' of chain. This sounds like enough to handle this task.

I'm going to try the dock/mooring line with a rolling hitch on the rode and fed back to my winch. I will report back to let you know what happens.

I just discovered that my trysail is not properly hanked. It has some kind of track cars on it and not hanks for attaching to the backstay. I'll get that corrected this weekend and also report on that too. I am thinking that if I attach the trysail to the mast it will not be far enough back to act like the feathers on the arrow and provide some aerodynamic stability to the boat.

Thanks for all of everyone's advice, it sounds like I will start having some more comfortable nights sleeping in the bed and not in the cockpit waiting for an anchor alarm from the GPS. I will be back in a couple of days to let you know how it goes.
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  #27  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lancer28 View Post
I had a chance to re-measure my chain and nylon today when I was installing new distance markers.

I actually have 400' of nylon 3 strand and 12' of chain. This sounds like enough to handle this task.
I would still recommend going up to 30' of chain.

Quote:
I'm going to try the dock/mooring line with a rolling hitch on the rode and fed back to my winch. I will report back to let you know what happens.
Should be interesting...

Quote:
I just discovered that my trysail is not properly hanked. It has some kind of track cars on it and not hanks for attaching to the backstay. I'll get that corrected this weekend and also report on that too. I am thinking that if I attach the trysail to the mast it will not be far enough back to act like the feathers on the arrow and provide some aerodynamic stability to the boat.
A storm trysail is designed to be used by going up the mast sail track...which is what the track cars are probably designed to fit. A riding sail is a totally different beast—with the best ones being effectively a diamond shaped sail with the luff of the sail along the center of the diamond and having two clews. This allows you to connect the two clews to the two aft corners of your boat and allow it to more effectively keep the boat headed into the wind.

Quote:
Thanks for all of everyone's advice, it sounds like I will start having some more comfortable nights sleeping in the bed and not in the cockpit waiting for an anchor alarm from the GPS. I will be back in a couple of days to let you know how it goes.
Look forward for it.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #28  
Old 09-01-2007
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We used that method to anchor alot when the wind didn't match the waves to stop rolling, but never to stop swinging, hadnt really needed to I guess. This was on a 65' 55ton sloop. Made it more comfortable for the creww when the divers where in the water.

It was also a method for gunships at anchor to change their feild of fire back in the day.
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  #29  
Old 09-11-2007
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Here are the result from three of my tests this week: the anchoring from the stern wasn't kept all night, and I switched to the riding sail. There was too much wind coming in the boat, the rocking and rolling was as bad as just anchoring from the bow, but with an amount of reduced swinging.

The bridle was my favorite, it seemed quite stable. I used a mooring line, with a speed shackle through the eye splice and back to a winch to tighten it.

The Riding sail alone was't too impressive. The boat still skittered back and forth, just not as much. (Maybe 1/2 as much... it was dark and I couldn't tell too well.)

Sorry, I'm a Doctor, not an artist Jim... haha!

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  #30  
Old 09-11-2007
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I'm hoping you weren't as close to being broadsides to the wind as your second illustration shows... should only be canted about 10-20˚, not much more than that, certainly not more than 45˚.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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