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  #31  
Old 10-17-2007
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To solve the 'three hands' issue I lay the tail of the main sheet over my shoulder - my main and traveller are behind my helm so it lays there naturally. It's always right there if I need it, but not filling a hand up or getting in the way. Of course, on a catamaran with a bulkhead in front of me it's not blowing around in the wind either.
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  #32  
Old 10-23-2007
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Id stay away from any ratchet devices on the Genoa....You would be in really deep weeds if you had to release the sheet in a hurry....however, I do agree with you when you ask about taking a turn around the leeward winch and then up to the windward winch .... Ive done that on ocean racing boats and it works well...keeps you much drier if youre the trimmer....its tough when tacking....its easy to get everything twisted if youre not careful.
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  #33  
Old 10-23-2007
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How you manage the genoa and main together while single handing are quite different on a keel boat compared to a dinghy. I understand you have both. The consequences of error on a dinghy are more serious than on a keel boat and they will happen much more quickly. As a result, it is important to have the main in hand and the genoa on a cleat that is easy to release if the wind comes up. That is the art of dinghy sailing.
On a keel boat one usually cleats everything off, frequently the helm is locked as well. The consequences of a gust may cause the boat to heel or round up but it will happen more slowly and you will be able to reach the main or traveller and ease it. If you are constantly being knocked down or if you are carrying lots of helm you have too much sail up. Depower the main and/or jib. The boat will go as fast or faster with less sail, either reef or change down on the jib or use other depowering techniques.
Cross sheeting is a common technique when racing for keeping the jib sheet close at hand with the crew on the weather side of the boat. Many boats are designed to facilitate it (J80, Flying Tiger). When single handing (as opposed to racing) it becomes a matter of convenience to have it all close to wherever you sit to steer.
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  #34  
Old 10-23-2007
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Lancer, One thing I did to ease the load on my jib sheets was to take a lesson from some high performance cats and scows and implement a 2:1 on the jib sheets. Tie your sheet off at your turning block (on your jib car if you have one), run it up to a block attached to the clew of your jib, back thru the block at your jib car, then back to your clutch or winch. You'll pull twice the line, but at half the load.
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  #35  
Old 10-23-2007
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No way

Quote:
Originally Posted by mxray6 View Post
Lancer, One thing I did to ease the load on my jib sheets was to take a lesson from some high performance cats and scows and implement a 2:1 on the jib sheets. Tie your sheet off at your turning block (on your jib car if you have one), run it up to a block attached to the clew of your jib, back thru the block at your jib car, then back to your clutch or winch. You'll pull twice the line, but at half the load.
This might an Ok technique on cat with a blade jib, but would be completely out of place on a 28 foot keel boat - the sheet winches should work fine, or get bigger ones if they do not. Having a block on the clew of a big jib (or any jib for that matter) is a good way to lose an eye or worse.
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  #36  
Old 10-23-2007
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Damn this was a funny thread.......
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  #37  
Old 10-23-2007
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What's your eye doing up there?

Sailingfool - Lancer asked a couple of questions - so keep this in context.
1. He asked how to singlehand easier.
2. He asked how to adjust his jib sheets "where I am not destroying my hands or turning my little sausages blue over a period of a few hours?"

So...if you're singlehanding, unless you're going foreward using an autopilot (or winvane or tillertamer or...) you're not going to have to worry about putting your eye out. I've been using this set up for years on a 24' keelboat with a 135 jib with no problems...and everyone still has their sight!!!

It is very effective at reducing the sheet load for the jib. While there is no doubt the winches can handle it, it's his little sausages that are the issue.

So I say...WAY!
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  #38  
Old 10-23-2007
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I sail with both sails cleated. When a "gust" hits I head up. Unless it's dark, you can see the disturbed water quite a bit away. If it is too windy to be comfortable heeling suddenly, then maybe a reef or two would make you more rested and dry
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  #39  
Old 10-24-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mxray6 View Post
So...if you're singlehanding, unless you're going foreward using an autopilot (or winvane or tillertamer or...) you're not going to have to worry about putting your eye out. I've been using this set up for years on a 24' keelboat with a 135 jib with no problems...and everyone still has their sight!!!
Then it seems that in your years of sailing you've never had to go forward to furl a torn jib in 30+ knots of breeze and big seas!!

I would think that losing an eye would be plain unlucky and that being tossed overboard or just killed outright is far more likely. It's amazing how fast the clew can move on a luffing headsail clearing everything in it's path, so for safety's sake it's a good idea to minimise the amount of flying metal that could impact some unfortunate's skull...
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  #40  
Old 10-24-2007
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Jib sheets = primary winches

Quote:
Originally Posted by mxray6 View Post
Sailingfool - Lancer asked a couple of questions - so keep this in context.
1. He asked how to singlehand easier.
2. He asked how to adjust his jib sheets "where I am not destroying my hands or turning my little sausages blue over a period of a few hours?"
.....
The answer to both is your boat has primary winches intended to handle jib sheet trimming - use 'em, you don't need anything else. I think there is confusion above regarding applying techniques appropriate for spinnaker sheet handling to jib sheet handling. On a 28 foot keel boat you don't "play" the jib sheets, you trim them as needed and then cleat them down, until you change course. Any gusty wind is handled by playing the main, in 35 years of sailing I've never had to blow a jib sheet to maintain control of the boat - doesn't happen. To assist single handing, get ST winches. Singlehanding with cross-sheeted JIB sheets in the cockpit is a formula for chaos.

If you use a double purchase on a jib sheet, then the jib sheet needs to be twice as long and you have any extra mess equivalent to four sheets in the cockpit, for what...

Spinnaker sheets are played - rachet blocks and cross-sheeting and so forth are all appropriate techniques and helpful to doing the job. Jib sheets - crank your primaries, cleat 'em and forget 'em. Just my opinion...

Last edited by sailingfool; 10-24-2007 at 10:31 AM.
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