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  #21  
Old 03-11-2008
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A 22' is small enough that you'll learn pretty fast on it... and big enough that you'll have someplace to sleep, and many of the same systems as a larger boat—anchor, rigging, plumbing, electrical—although a bit simpler.

I'm not familiar with the C&C 22, are you sure it's a C&C 22?? I know catalina and Canadian Seacraft both made 22' boats, but don't recall C&C making one. I thought the smallest C&C was a 24'.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #22  
Old 03-11-2008
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Question 22 footer

Would a 22 footer be safe enough to take into lake Erie?

Are most 22 footer trailerable?

What about my question of taking the 7 day course for the knowledge and experience?

Thanks,
John
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  #23  
Old 03-11-2008
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A good recommendation for a starter boat is the Catalina 22 (A.K.A. C22, Cat22 etc) for the following reasons. First, I think that they made close to 20,000 of them over the years so they are common as grass. Second, they have reasonable build quality and generally are a good resale value. Third, there is an extremely active class association with national, regional and local groups. And, they are relatively simple and comfortable to sail. They are by no means a performance boat, but you do get a simple cabin big enough for two to “camp” in. This was my first boat and I have some pretty fond memories sailing her.

What is that old saying? “If mama ain’t happy, then nobody’s happy?” Boats can become a big monetary and time commitment and if your wife isn’t on board, you will soon find yourself boatless. I have two words of advice for you, flush plumbing. My wife liked the 22, but it was a bit too much like camping for her so she would often stay home, not wanting to make the hour drive to go day sailing. Our 28 footer changed all that as the comfort ability was night and day when compared to the 22. We started to spend a lot more weekends on that boat. We soon grew out of that boat relatively quickly and then bought our 34. Three more words for you, yacht club membership. Like most spouses, my wife enjoys the social aspect way more than doing things like pushing the boat through heavy weather or racing. She is a lot more confident and comfortable knowing that her friends can handle the same the same set of conditions that we are sailing in. We did a pretty bad round down and broach once in a race and if it wasn’t for my wife seeing how calm the other three wives were, we probably would have never left the dock after that. Now, it has taken her several years to get over her fears of anything related to spinnakers, but I’m proud to say that I was able to get her to double hand our gennaker a couple of weeks ago, hooray! Again, knowing that her girl friends can do it gives her confidence. Plus, she likes to go to parties and such. Since January, we have spent six weekends on the boat and “winter” is our off season!
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  #24  
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A 22' boat should be fine on Lake Erie, as long as you watch the weather forecast. The weather on the Great Lakes can get pretty nasty.

Most 22' boats are trailerable. However, some are more trailerable than others.

As for the three courses, in a single seven day stretch... I wouldn't do it. I'd spread the courses out a bit more, because then you can get the most out of the courses IMHO. Until you have some experience, you won't know enough to really get the most out of the more advanced courses. Taking a few months between courses and sailing your own boat during that time, will get you a lot more out of the advanced courses.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sailitaway View Post
Would a 22 footer be safe enough to take into lake Erie?

Are most 22 footer trailerable?

What about my question of taking the 7 day course for the knowledge and experience?

Thanks,
John
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #25  
Old 03-23-2008
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Yep, definitely take her on the Bahamas trip, and your in like Flint. Use to sail on Lake Erie, every from the time I was 4, until about 25, then Florida. You get the Admiral in a controlled situation like BWSS, she won't want to quit.

Don't do like I did with my first wife when I committed mutiny said, "I'm gettin' the F$#kin' boat and thats final. Must be why she was my first wife.
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  #26  
Old 03-23-2008
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BWSS & Sailing

John:
I took my first sailing lesson with my wife out of Marblehead MA last summer -2007 @ 53 years of age. While my wife wasn't exactly thrilled with the adventure, I kind of caught the bug. Within the next 6 months, I purchased my first sailboat - a Hinckley Pilot 35 - Sapphire (40 years old, and in the need of some updates - I've been real busy this winter), and took the liveaboard coarses - A101, A103, and A104 thru the BWSS out of St Thomas this past December. My instructor was excellenct, and my other fellow students, while quite different from me in age and outloook, shared a common interst in getting our sailing certificates. The experience sailing around BVI was amazing, and helped build a lot of confidence. I'm now considering the off shore course - FLA to San Juan.
I was evaluating where to moor my pilot for the 2008 season. I had 2 choices - Salem MA, a 45 minute drive, and Marion MA, a 90 minute drive. I chose Marion because the sailing options were greater, and I have the ability to sleep on Sapphire, which allows me to stretch out my trip.
Anyway, at our young age, (as long as we are healthy and fit), I can easily see 20 years of adventures and experience sailing.
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  #27  
Old 03-24-2008
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Pilot35,
Here's a website for you : www.hinckleypilot.com
There is a Hinckley Pilot Owner's Association in the early stages of development. Great group of people. Congrats on buying Sapphire. I was a Pilot owner for 10 years...sold her last year.
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  #28  
Old 03-24-2008
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Petmac:
I think you said that you installed a carbon fiber mast and boom. What was the cost/benefit of the upgrade, and who did the work? I think I saw some stats about a race you ran with the mods??
Thanks,
Garrett
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  #29  
Old 03-29-2008
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You might want to check out the SailTime base in Cleveland. The ASA101 course is usually included in the initial training and you can get back into it without a long-term commitment. I went that route since I live a little under 2 hours from where I sail (Lake Lanier, GA) and its worked well for me. With all that travel time its nice not to have to spend extra time maintaining the boat. Wives tend to like Hunters so it could be a good way for you to scratch your itch and ease her into it. If you decide to own later you can get out of the agreement with just 3 months notice (or forfeit the deposit and get out immediately). The downside is you don't get to customize the boat like it was yours but all sailing involves compromises.
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