Steer with rudder or outboard? - Page 2 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Learning to Sail
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #11  
Old 05-20-2008
cnc33voodoo's Avatar
cap'n chronic
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: richmond hill
Posts: 235
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
cnc33voodoo is on a distinguished road
on my old mirage 24 i would always lock the motor and use the rudder.i would however lower the motor when entering the marina as it seemed to give me more control in reverse.you just have to remember to go slow and youll get used to it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #12  
Old 05-20-2008
timebandit's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 928
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 13
timebandit is on a distinguished road
[quote=nolatom;317365]
Also, how does a solid link between rudder and motor work if, once you're done with the motor, you're going to kick up the outboard to reduce drag, which is what we do on this lightweight boat? Seems to me learning to do both manually is part of the learning curve.


Just disconect the link.

Conecting the two will ensure the rudder does not get eaten by the prop.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #13  
Old 05-20-2008
eMKay's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Buffalo
Posts: 838
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
eMKay is on a distinguished road
[QUOTE=timebandit;317451]
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolatom View Post
Also, how does a solid link between rudder and motor work if, once you're done with the motor, you're going to kick up the outboard to reduce drag, which is what we do on this lightweight boat? Seems to me learning to do both manually is part of the learning curve.


Just disconect the link.

Conecting the two will ensure the rudder does not get eaten by the prop.
The rudder can't touch the prop on my boat, it has a spring loaded mount, the prop doesn't come close to the rudder.. The mount has two lower setting too, one for short shaft, and one for long shaft which is convenient because I have a long shaft now, but just bought a short shaft 4-stroke.

__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Technician, RCR Yachts Buffalo.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #14  
Old 05-20-2008
Classic30's Avatar
Once known as Hartley18
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 4,618
Thanks: 38
Thanked 55 Times in 55 Posts
Rep Power: 9
Classic30 will become famous soon enough Classic30 will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by timebandit View Post
.....
Conecting the two will ensure the rudder does not get eaten by the prop.
I must admit that I have never really understood why people find this to be an issue. :-(

Our outboard has a simple stiff plastic plate (with rounded edges of course) bolted to the top of the inside "wing" on the outboard leg. With this set-up there is no way the rudder can ever reach the prop and is so simple it beggars belief as to why it's not common practice the world over...

FWIW, we alway use the rudder to steer our little Hartley. The outboard tiller is only ever used for tight manouevering near the dock and as a fine adjustment to keep the boat straight under power. Reverse is crap, but you get used to that.
__________________
-
"Honestly, I don't know why seamen persist in getting wrecked in some of the outlandish places they do, when they can do it in a nice place like Fiji." -- John Caldwell, "Desperate Voyage"
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #15  
Old 05-21-2008
seeker
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: western canada
Posts: 74
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
feetup is on a distinguished road
The propeller is not the only way to eat a rudder with an outboard.
Getting up a bit of stern way and having the tiller get free to slam against the stop is a sure way to over stress at least the rudder, if not the stock and tiller, and the side of my head, as the quickly moving tiller struck my temple just as I turned to look.
That was a lesson I'll NEVER forget.
I vote for connecting the outboard to the tiller.


Feetup.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #16  
Old 05-21-2008
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 10
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
knormb is on a distinguished road
good advice!

We took our Cal 25 out for the first time last Sunday, the sailing was fun and all went well until coming back into the (tight) slip. But I was trying to steer with the rudder and had the outboard locked. It didn't help that the outboard died when I shifted into reverse. No permanent damage, (and I didn't hit another boat) but did cause a bit more attention focussed our way than desired.

Next time I'll try steering with the outboard. And hope it keeps running.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #17  
Old 05-22-2008
Classic30's Avatar
Once known as Hartley18
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 4,618
Thanks: 38
Thanked 55 Times in 55 Posts
Rep Power: 9
Classic30 will become famous soon enough Classic30 will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by feetup View Post
The propeller is not the only way to eat a rudder with an outboard.
Getting up a bit of stern way and having the tiller get free to slam against the stop is a sure way to over stress at least the rudder, if not the stock and tiller, and the side of my head, as the quickly moving tiller struck my temple just as I turned to look.
That was a lesson I'll NEVER forget.
I vote for connecting the outboard to the tiller.
I hate to break this to you, but connecting the outboard to the tiller is not going to prevent that happening and having a stop on the rudder before it gets to the hard over point (like on the side of the outboard perhaps) is going to be the best way to reduce stress on the rudder in the situation you mention.

The only _slight_ disadvantage that I can see in not having the two linked is that the outboard restricts the amount you can swing the tiller over one way when near the dock - but at low speed you should be steering with the outboard anyway, so it's a bit irrelevant really..

The way to fix your problem?? Don't let go of the tiller!
__________________
-
"Honestly, I don't know why seamen persist in getting wrecked in some of the outlandish places they do, when they can do it in a nice place like Fiji." -- John Caldwell, "Desperate Voyage"
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #18  
Old 06-05-2008
merttan's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: CT
Posts: 317
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
merttan is on a distinguished road
In close quarters, I use both for really close turns. I don't have a connection between them, I just use both hands...It takes a bit getting used to but fairly easy and really useful especially when docking or manuevering around moorings...
__________________
" I refuse to engage in an intellectual battle with an unarmed man!"

Materialism: Buying the things we don't need, with money we don't have, to impress people who don't matter.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #19  
Old 06-05-2008
Classic30's Avatar
Once known as Hartley18
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 4,618
Thanks: 38
Thanked 55 Times in 55 Posts
Rep Power: 9
Classic30 will become famous soon enough Classic30 will become famous soon enough
Of course, the BEST solution is to mount the outboard in a well immediately inboard of the transom.

Sure, there's a bit of work involved: Cutting a hole about 18" square in the cockpit and the bottom of the boat, making up an open-ended box out of ply, glassing it in place and re-fitting the outboard bracket... But you do get the following advantages:

1. No obstruction to rudder or tiller movement (the outboard cowling is now underneath the tiller, not beside it)
2. No over-revving in steep chop when the prop clears the water (it can't).
3. No weight hanging over the stern (better trim).
4. No risk of dropping the thing overboard when lifting it in/out for maintenance.
5. You can maintain the thing without risk of falling overboard or losing parts into the briny.
6. Reduced risk of theft (if it ain't there, it can't be pinched!)
7. The boat looks more like a real yacht.

The only disadvantage is the work involved to do it.
__________________
-
"Honestly, I don't know why seamen persist in getting wrecked in some of the outlandish places they do, when they can do it in a nice place like Fiji." -- John Caldwell, "Desperate Voyage"
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #20  
Old 06-05-2008
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Scotland
Posts: 2,286
Thanks: 0
Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts
Rep Power: 9
Rockter will become famous soon enough
The outboard has the advantage that it can steer at very low speed. The rudder struggles at low boat speed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Building a Rudder Newport 30 Armchairprotest Gear & Maintenance 5 04-07-2009 02:11 PM
Emergency Steering John Kretschmer Seamanship Articles 0 03-08-2002 08:00 PM
Emergency Steering John Kretschmer Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 03-08-2002 08:00 PM
Emergency Steering John Kretschmer Cruising Articles 0 03-08-2002 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:34 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.