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  #21  
Old 05-23-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Hertford-

Where do you sail out of?? North Carolina?? My boat's down in Fairhaven. If you were local, I'd volunteer to be bowman for your spinny initiation.
My boat is in Elizabeth City. I actually grew up in Fairhaven. My brother was the chief of police.
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  #22  
Old 05-23-2008
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Plumper-

That's not your personal sailboat... so that's cheating... you don't own it.

Gui's spinnaker is something like 1600 sq. ft... which puts it up there as personal boats go.



Hertford-

An asym will usually have the clew and tack marked as such... I highly suggest you yank the sail out of the bag and at least find out whether it is a sym or asym.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
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her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #23  
Old 05-23-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Plumper View Post
As you can tell by the comments, most people fear spins. They really are a great sail and not to be feared in reasonable winds.
Ok..Plumper...let'd be honest here, ok?? (sorry I am just touchy lately, nothing personal with you..)...I think you are not being reasonable in you remark...we're not instigating fear...were'e being conscient, and promote for his safety...he doesn't even know what sail he has...


Fear what? respect yes..fear?? I did not see it here...in any of the posts here...

you're just being "brave" for show off(and shows in your comments), but you have been at sea many years, crewed and captain many boats ALL WITH EXPERIENCED CREWS!!!! and many large boats...

You are very brave with it..but how many crew did you ever have when you flew the spi??? (except the assymetricals)...I saw the photos on the ship...they are all assymetricals...that doesn't really count...and how many crew??? Its a large boat that sails at 10 kts...what can go wrong??? with 30 on board???

How many crew do you have when you fly the sym spi normally??? do you fly it alone??? in your boat

How many times have you flown it in your personal boat alone with no expereinceed crew??? even with crew howe many??? That is experience..which he doesn't have...

This guy has no exprience ...NONE..nothing....your commnet is like Al Unser making a remark at a guy that never drove before saying...look at me I do it all the time.....

I am not brave...I don't fly my sym alone...and its "only" 1500 sq feet (very humble comapred to you), but I do it with another guy on the boat...and in light conditions could do it alone...but don't risk it...my pole alone is 14 feet or something like that...

Can you fly my spi like that???? wanna bet you can't????

I think this guy needs a touch of reality..not a touch of bravery supported by Navy ships and large crews...

Sorry for the rant

Last edited by Giulietta; 05-23-2008 at 01:09 PM.
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  #24  
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Good point... there's a huge difference between sailing and flying a spinnaker with a trained and experienced crew and doing it effectively solo on a small boat with no experience what so ever.

A spinnaker should be respected at a minimum, as even a small one is going to have some serious forces involved and can lead to a dangerous broach or knockdown if you're not careful.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #25  
Old 05-23-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hertfordnc View Post
How's this for clueless- I haven't taken it out of the bag and I didn't get any info from the PO.

I have a pole, I assume that's what I'll use.
Right on! And don't listen to Sailing Dog - you have two clews.

If you are determined to set it, do the following:

1. As has been mentioned, get plenty of sea room - your goal should be to get it up, practice trimming, and get it down without breaking anything (which you can do).

2. Do not run DDW, you have to be careful about not gybing and that will be hard if your focusing on the chute and running DDW. Plus, DDW is slow - sail a broad reach.

3. Get everything set before you pull anything out the bag:
A. Get the headsail down or furled - you're not racing, you're learning, so make it easy.
B. Clip the bag to the lifelines. If it has two clips, use them both on either side of a stanchion.
C. Make sure your spin sheets are run properly. Unless you KNOW otherwise, run the sheets outside of everything, to turning blocks at the back of the cockpit, and forward to either primary or secondary winches. This step is important - if the lines aren't run right, you'll get in trouble quick.
D. Clip on the sheets and the halyard. If there color coded, clip the port sheet on the red clew, the stbd sheet on the green clew and the halyard on the head (red and green tapes run together). If they are not color coded get a big sharpie and write (big) HEAD, PORT CLEW, STBD CLEW. Yes, it's OK to write on sails.
E. Get the pole ready. The pole goes on the side of the boat opposite the boom. Take the guy (which is the spin sheet that controls the poles position fore and aft) and put it in the outboard end of the pole. Then pull on the bridle of the pole (the wires with rings in the middle). The pole is up when the jaws are up. So, if you lift one of the bridles and hold the pole, the jaws should be facing upwards - clip your topping lift onto this. Clip your downhaul (I recommend you use one) onto the other bridle. With the guy in the outboard jaw and the topping lift on the bridle, attach the pole to the ring on the mast.

4. You should have everything all set now. Pull on the guy and bring that clew to the pole. Bring the pole back from the forestay a bit.

5. Raise the halyard as fast as possible and cleat it off. At this moment, moving quickly is a good thing.

6. Still moving quickly, bring the pole back more. It should be on roughly the same plane as the boom.

7. Still moving quickly, sheet in the sail (not too aggressively) until it fills. As you trim the chute, ease the sheet until the luff curls and then trim. It should be almost constant motion: curl, trim, ease, curl, trim, etc.

8. Sail away and have fun learning the new chute.

9. Dousing the chute. This can be fun and exciting. The goal is to get the chute down below quickly. Have a crew member at the companionway ready to stuff the sail down below. Have a crew member on the coachroof on the leeward side ready to hand sail to the crew in the companionway. To douse, have the crew member on the coachroof grab hold of the sheet. Blow the guy completely - the pole will go to the headstay, just leave it for now. Ease the halyard down - do not blow the halyard completely unless you like shrimp (see below). Ease the halyard at a steady pace until the chute is collapsed and about a third of it is on deck - then blow the halyard and help get the chute below.

DO NOT HAVE KNOTS TIED ONTO THE END OF THE SPINNAKER SHEETS OR THE SPINNAKER HALYARD. IF YOU LOSE CONTROL, BLOW EVERYTHING.

However, you probably won't have to do that. Here are some common issues and their resolutions:

1. Hour glass: This occurs when you hoist the cute and the clews get twisted. Pull on the luff of the sail and it will unwrap (probably).

2. Wrapped around headstay. Pull on clew, pull on sheets, curse, pray, drink heavily. It'll come off eventually (probably).

3. Broaching. You need to collapse the chute, so ease pole and sheet in. Get the chute behind the main and let it collapse.

4. Shrimping. This means you didn't douse right and the sail is in the water and, if you really do it wrong, wrapped around the keel. Solution: I like a good lemon caper butter sauce with my shrimp. ---- just get the sail back on the boat as best you can.
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  #26  
Old 05-23-2008
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I should probably qualify the above post and say that the chute is a complicated sail and, because it projects in front of the boat, will increase your chances for a broach. It really is best to hoist it with someone experienced. Or, better yet, go racing a few times and see how it's done.

That said, it is just another sail and there's no reason not to use and enjoy it. I've had mine up solo and there's a sense of accomplishment in that.

But be careful, you can get in trouble with it.
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To the advice above, and especially the excellent step-by-step from Nolasailing (a fellow Lake Pontchartrainer), I would add only:

8-9 knots of steady breeze and plenty of downwind searoom is perfect. 12 knots is too much. 5 isn't enough.

Set up by the leeward rail, just forward of your sidestays. Have your wife or daughter hold a broad reach course, this will ensure the chute stays blanketed by the eased-out main while you raise it, and doesn't fill too soon.

Then get back into the cockpit and trim the guy first, until it pulls the pole back to a right angle with the wind. This will "spread" the clews apart, and it will start to fill. Cleat off the guy real quick, and trim the sheet in before it runs out of the block.

Then do what NOLAsailing says regarding trim.

When you douse the chute, use the blanket of the main again, to make your job easier. While crew eases the guy completely, you grab the leeward clew and pull on the foot of the chute from the lee side until you have it all in your arms, and it should be collapsed by then (blanketed by the main) and easy to handle. Then anyone can let the halyard off, about 10 feet at a time, as you stuff it down the companionway.

Wait for the right weather! And good luck. For the first outing, I wouldn't try to jibe, just experiment with coming up and heading down on the same tack, and don't scare your family ;-)
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  #28  
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Nolasailing—

Last I checked, the OP doesn't know what type of spinnaker he has... and an Asym has a tack and clew... not two clews...

Obviously you're missing a clew too.

Quote:
Right on! And don't listen to Sailing Dog - you have two clews.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #29  
Old 05-23-2008
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hertfordnc,

I just came back from the Outer Banks or I would drive down and learn with you to save your wife and daughter. The blind leading the blind.

Jim
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I kind of figured with a 31-year-old boat, it was a good old symmetrical kite, and once Hertford said he had a pole, I became convinced.

I may be too old-school, but I like symmetrical spinnakers better. You can get them out from behind the main and actually run.

Anyway, Hertford, let us know if you got the right weather (otherwise don't try) and if you did, how it went..
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