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-   -   Heaving to off the wind (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/learning-sail/47582-heaving-off-wind.html)

captainfrank 09-29-2008 07:14 PM

Heaving to off the wind
 
Im curious to find out if anyone has ever heard of this method for heaving to while on a broad reach or run. I found that by taking the boat onto a run the headsail collapses behind the main. When this happens I bring the headsail across the boat to the windard and haul it in close to the shrouds. I then slowly bring the boat up into the wind and it gently comes to a stop in the hove to position. I single hand alot and found it quite easy to accomplish this manuever in most any wind. I much prefer this over coming up to close hauled and tacking over especially when I'm alone. A side benefit is that the boat remains on the original tack and can continue on it's course without having to tack back over again once underway.

Giulietta 09-29-2008 08:18 PM

go here..see the FIFTH VIDEO

anchorsaweigh 09-29-2008 08:33 PM

How would I heave to? :confused:

Cheers,

Bob

jager 09-29-2008 08:37 PM

I learned the same method years ago from a friend. A few of the J World Racing Instructors use the same for "teaching moments" and lunch breaks.

Jager

nolatom 09-29-2008 10:14 PM

By blanketing the jib, you're making it easier to haul to windward. This may be a better way to commence a heave-to when it's windy and you're shorthanded. In light air, the tack without releasing the jib method will work just fine.

The mechanics of balance vary from boat to boat, and from sailplan to sailplan. If you like that method better, then do it that way.

tenuki 10-07-2008 11:17 PM

yes. now do it without using the rudder and I'll be impressed.

CapnHand 10-08-2008 08:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by anchorsaweigh (Post 377230)
How would I heave to? :confused:

Your situation is not totally hopeless. With 3 reefs, the bimini just might balance the sail. Your chances improve dramatically when there's no wind.

tweitz 10-08-2008 09:40 PM

Captain Frank's method is slightly different from the one suggested in Giuletta's excellent video. The video suggests heaving to to leeward by essentially gybing the main and leaving the headsail sheeted on the windward side. Captain Frank suggests getting on a nearly dead run, leaving the main where it is and moving the headsail across while it is blanketed by the wind shadow of the main, and thus sheltered from the wind. Of course if not for the rudder movement this is simply how one would move to sailing wing on wing. My concern in Captain Frank's method, which sounds reasonable, is that one had better be very careful to avoid an accidental gybe. With that caveat, I think I will give it a try.

chucklesR 10-08-2008 09:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tweitz (Post 381720)
Captain Frank's method is slightly different from the one suggested in Giuletta's excellent video. The video suggests heaving to to leeward by essentially gybing the main and leaving the headsail sheeted on the windward side. Captain Frank suggests getting on a nearly dead run, leaving the main where it is and moving the headsail across while it is blanketed by the wind shadow of the main, and thus sheltered from the wind. Of course if not for the rudder movement this is simply how one would move to sailing wing on wing. My concern in Captain Frank's method, which sounds reasonable, is that one had better be very careful to avoid an accidental gybe. With that caveat, I think I will give it a try.

On a run single handed (his case) would you not already have a preventer rigged? I would.

tweitz 10-08-2008 11:29 PM

That is one of the ways to be careful. On the other hand, if you were on a reach and using that method, you would not have been on a run until you began the process of heaving to.


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