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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Learning to Sail
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  #21  
Old 03-02-2009
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Anti-Seasick Glasses?

I had never heard of them before, but I saw some for sale on eBay yesterday. Super geeky, birth control style. Said to work on some sort of built in artificial horizon that fools the brain ofd the wearer.

Maybe like "Peril Sensitive Sunglasses" from Hitchhikers Guide to the Universe; the more danger you're in, the darker they get. What you can't see can't hurt you.
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  #22  
Old 03-02-2009
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I have no idea if I get seasick or not... if I'm going offshore I take two before I leave and then one each time I come off watch - worked like a charm so far!
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Old 03-02-2009
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seasick

Lots of food, ginger snaps work well.
Helm as stated above- keeps them distracted.
We have stern rail seats- they work everytime, even the most sea sick prone make it through the day- eyes on the horizon and lots of fresh air.
Avoid going below.

"Motion Ease" behind the ears works well, if all else fails. Can find it at most fishing or marine stores. The wrist bands ( elastic with a plastic ball)were ok for some. Good for kids to avoid chemicals.

Dragonfly203
Annapolis
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Old 03-02-2009
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I just came back from a week sailing in Abaco, we had up to 35knot wind.
Bought a pack of Gravor at the marina shop and I'm really glad I did.
Had no side effects, and felt great. Usually I'm seasick for 2 days, but this time it was just gone !
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Old 03-02-2009
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Sea sick threads always interest me since I get sick evertime out. I have tried about everything I can get my hands on. Ginger helps, but I am learning the triggers which is important to.

For me they are anchoring and going below. I am good otherwise. Of course I am usually asleep most of the other times, read as I can't stay awake if I have to no matter if i took anything or not.
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Old 03-02-2009
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i am lucky, i have only gotten sick once and it was in the navy. my wife is a weird one, she gets sick topside sometimes, but can lay in the vberth and it goes away
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Old 03-02-2009
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I use Dramamine II . It is meclazine, and co incidentaly I just spent two hours reading the internet on antihistamines and motion sickness. There seems to be no time limit for continued use and I have been on it for extended periods. One pill morning and one evening for me. Original Dramamine is diphenhydramine. I just happened upon a site touting the benefits of being able to "trip"/halucinate, on Dramamine. Geez what next. Any way ...don't exceed the dosage on the box, might see stuff you don't wanta.
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Old 03-03-2009
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I can understand why going below would trigger it, but how/why does anchoring trigger it??

Quote:
Originally Posted by twisty2 View Post
Sea sick threads always interest me since I get sick evertime out. I have tried about everything I can get my hands on. Ginger helps, but I am learning the triggers which is important to.

For me they are anchoring and going below. I am good otherwise. Of course I am usually asleep most of the other times, read as I can't stay awake if I have to no matter if i took anything or not.
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  #29  
Old 03-03-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
I can understand why going below would trigger it, but how/why does anchoring trigger it??
I don't know, it just does. At this point I associate it with anchoring but it could just be the anxiety of knowing that soon I will be chumming again but it could probably be just stopping that triggers it, I never tried just drifting to see what happens, going out this weekend will have to test it out.
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Old 03-04-2009
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Some thoughts after reading the thread.

The best cure is to to take the helm. Many people get car sick, I know of no one who gets sick driving. Once you get sick there really is no cure, although I had read about suppositories being effective.

Avoid cooking, navigating or other activities below. Strong smells such as food and diesel will contribute to mal de mer. Get lots of sleep and avoid excessive alcohol. Sea sickness seems to be contagious, after one gets it the rest follow. Avoid dwelling on it in conversations. Nervous seems to add to the likelihood of getting sick.

Each of the drugs affects everyone differently. I get a very dry mouth from Scopolamine (which my wife, a pharmacist, does not recommend because it can affect cognitive processes). Care must be taken that hands are washed carefully after touching the patch; contact with the eyes is brutal.

Stugeron is highly touted, but one client was asleep for 12 hours after taking it.

I use a generic Gravol (dimenhydrinate). I get a little drowsy, but remain functional, after taking 1. That is usually enough to get me on my sea legs.

Regardless of what you are using, find out in advance what side effects present themselves. You might try taking one, and then go out as a passenger for a long car ride on twisty roads, while reading a book. That might let you know if it works.

In no circumstances think that you will just find out if you get sick on a passage. We had a 69 year old, 140 pound crew member who was sick from Bermuda to St Barthe's. After that, he was rethinking a 5,000 trip he was contemplating.

Jack
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