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  #31  
Old 03-04-2009
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I went years without ever understanding how people could get seasick and then suddenly I started getting hit every time I went out - or worse yet went diving. Good to know regulators are designed for it and it draws the fish in close.

The helm works every time. I also avoid doing anything fine - looking at charts, reading a book, digging through gear bags for small items. Avoid alcohol and coffee and try to eat something reasonably substantial a few hours before going - not 30 minutes. Sleep is also very important. I use 1/2 or 1/3 scopaline patch behind the ear (I weigh 210#) the night before and that takes the edge off without most of the side-effects, but I still can feel woozy when I take it off later. I've found if you try ginger get pickled ginger - it works almost immediately and is easy to digest. I've also used the elastic wrist bands with the plastic bead and they work pretty well for me. They work great for my girlfriend.

Only other tip I can suggest is I really think it's part mental, part real and the more you get stressed over it the worse it'll get. I got sick for years doing recreational stuff, then started working boats and rescues full time. One night it occurred to me while being bounced around on an open deck trying to do emt stuff that I certainly felt disoriented, but I was too damn busy to get sick and it just went away. So there must be a mind over matter component to it. I think if you get comfortable doing whatever it is you are doing it greatly reduces the chance of getting sick. If I'm just doing a dive now I rarely get sick, but if I'm doing an evaluation or something I use the scopaline.
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Last edited by Elzaar; 03-04-2009 at 02:57 AM.
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  #32  
Old 03-04-2009
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I've never gotten seasick, even just before a hurricane in the keys, we went diving and the divemaster puked through his regulator.. we were moving 6-8 feet forward and back on the bottom..

I can't believe that lying down below would help someone.. it's a joke when we're out fishing, if you feel bad, just go down below and lie in the V and close your eyes....that'll show you how sick you really can get..

i probably oughtta knock on wood
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  #33  
Old 03-04-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WheresTheBrakes View Post
I can't believe that lying down below would help someone.. it's a joke when we're out fishing, if you feel bad, just go down below and lie in the V and close your eyes....that'll show you how sick you really can get..

i probably oughtta knock on wood
The V berth is exactly the wrong place to be. You want to be in a place with the least motion - the saloon sole, along the centreline, right above the keel. And keep your eyes closed. You want to avoid the mixed mesages between your eyes and the motion sensors in your inner ears.

This is only for those crews who are incapacitated and who would be a danger if on deck.

BTW - if you are in rough seas, everyone should carry a Ziplock bag for puking.

Jack
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  #34  
Old 03-04-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Elzaar View Post
I went years without ever understanding how people could get seasick and then suddenly I started getting hit every time I went out - or worse yet went diving. Good to know regulators are designed for it and it draws the fish in close.

The helm works every time. I also avoid doing anything fine - looking at charts, reading a book, digging through gear bags for small items. Avoid alcohol and coffee and try to eat something reasonably substantial a few hours before going - not 30 minutes. Sleep is also very important. I use 1/2 or 1/3 scopaline patch behind the ear (I weigh 210#) the night before and that takes the edge off without most of the side-effects, but I still can feel woozy when I take it off later. I've found if you try ginger get pickled ginger - it works almost immediately and is easy to digest. I've also used the elastic wrist bands with the plastic bead and they work pretty well for me. They work great for my girlfriend.

Only other tip I can suggest is I really think it's part mental, part real and the more you get stressed over it the worse it'll get. I got sick for years doing recreational stuff, then started working boats and rescues full time. One night it occurred to me while being bounced around on an open deck trying to do emt stuff that I certainly felt disoriented, but I was too damn busy to get sick and it just went away. So there must be a mind over matter component to it. I think if you get comfortable doing whatever it is you are doing it greatly reduces the chance of getting sick. If I'm just doing a dive now I rarely get sick, but if I'm doing an evaluation or something I use the scopaline.
There definitely is a mind over matter thing here but I just can't get my mind to agree with my body that it doesn't matter that I am on a rolling, pitching boat.

But at this point I know most of it is in my head.
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  #35  
Old 06-02-2009
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Seasickness

I know I will get flamed for this but, as marijuana is used as an anti nausea drug in cancer therapy... I can personally attest as to it's effectiveness as a seasick remedy. I'll challenge anyone to come up with a better cure. The question is, will "they" take your boat away.......
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Old 06-02-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnvye View Post
I know I will get flamed for this but, as marijuana is used as an anti nausea drug in cancer therapy... I can personally attest as to it's effectiveness as a seasick remedy. I'll challenge anyone to come up with a better cure. The question is, will "they" take your boat away.......

Would I have to inhale?
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  #37  
Old 06-02-2009
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Seasickness

I don't think you have to inhale. Cancer patients get this in capsule form with THC being the active ingredient. Apparently, just the fear of being caught is enough to take your mind off the seasickness..... at least that is what I've heard.:-}
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  #38  
Old 06-02-2009
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Never sail on an empty stomach or allow yourself to get cold. Both seem to make it worse. Not usually prone to being sick I was out on a sail a few miles offshore, long slow swell. I went below to do something and quickly started to feel unwell. I quickly came back up on deck and managed to avoid the spiral into full motion sickness but it still took me 40 mins to feel okay again.. Soon as I could I ate some food. Ginger tablets from health food stores do seem to work. In rougher choppy sea I can stay below and not get crook.

My girlfriend will sometimes say she feels unwell in the first hour of sailing, especially if we have not been out for some time. To some degree it's nerves on her part, I just leave her on the helm and she'll come good..Even to the point of eating lunch.

Mychael
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  #39  
Old 06-02-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mipcar View Post
... I just leave her on the helm and she'll come good..Even to the point of eating lunch.

Mychael
I also believe that giving someone a task that keeps them in the cockpit can help stave off mal de mar. Being in the cockpit helps keep the horizon in view at all times.

I was on a 50' sailboat with 2 young teenagers and other crew as we started pounding into some 40 knot gusts on the LI Sound and 5' + seas. The poor young ones were awakened by the bashing of the boat and barely got out of their bunks without retching. They both loved handling the wheel in spite of the spray and wind and the cool which kept them rotating for a lot of it - again, they were engaged in the handling of the boat which gave them something more important to focus on then their queasiness.
While the teens were conning the boat I took up a position in the main cabin and gave myself a few jobs: #1 keeping a hand for myself at all times, #2 looking out the port holes frequently to have an idea where we were near the coast, #3 handle the gear that was being thrown about by the motion of the boat - custodian of the cabin, #4 assist in food prep for those in the cockpit and #5, have a conversation with another crew member and sneak a few visits to the cockpit, sea and sky for variety.
Five foot and much bigger waves/swells are common on our oceans and in my limited ocean or blue water experience I have still not experienced sea sickness yet, knock wood. On the one ocean voyage I did of 400 nm. I found that at night the loss of horizon in my vision and deciphering what I was hearing more difficult then anything. I had jobs to do. I cooked a pasta dinner for us on our way past St. Thomas heading towards TCI when the owner asked if I was willing. I was quite game and left him at the wheel. I really do think that having a task or mission, if you will, is what helps keep the brain from going down the sea-sickness spiral.
I have not yet retched, puked, blown my cookies in a North Atlantic storm because I have not been there yet. I may be one of the last to succumb to a vomit infused hull caught ass out in such conditions. I can only hope I don't end up there with 30 meter waves.
It really is so subjective and different for everyone.
Tryin' to keep my chow down,
CalebD
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  #40  
Old 06-24-2009
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Regarding kids, my 6 year old gets queasy sometimes. We were out this weekend motoring home into 20 knots against current for 3 hours. I had 5 kids on board so I thought a movie down in the v-berth would help the trip pass more easily (for them and me.) They kids were in the v-berth trying to watch the movie but the boat was moving so much the movie was skipping.

No kids got sick!! How? Well I said as we left, does anyone want a spicy candy? They all did (it was a ginger candy). Second I told my wife to NOT say anything like "if you feel sick come up and watch the horizon"...I thought it was better to wait and watch and not get them thinking about it.

The seas (lake) calmed down a while out but still not talking about it and ginger seemed to work.

Good luck
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