How do I keep an effective log? - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Learning to Sail
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 05-05-2009
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Glendale, CA
Posts: 25
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Shadrak is on a distinguished road
Question How do I keep an effective log?

Is there a required format or logbook? What do I have to include to make each enrty count as on the water experience? Will charter companies accept most unofficial entries?
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 05-05-2009
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
It depends on what kind of sailing you're doing. If you're just out day sailing, a detailed log isn't so important, and I might just jot down where we went, who was aboard and any special events that might have occurred, like seeing whales or dolphins...

For a longer passage, with a specific destination in mind, then I'll generally keep a much more detailed log. This log is useful to document weather, fuel usage, engine hours, as well as have a fairly detailed record of the course and distances run. This information becomes very useful to look back upon when sailing the same area in the future. Jotting down the basic information every hour or two, like course, heading, distance run, barometric pressure, lat/lon position, and weather conditions only takes a minute, and gives you a lot of good information on a longer passage.

For instance, if the barometric pressure is slowly dropping, you can expect a low pressure system and front to be coming, but not too serious in terms of weather. If the barometric pressure is dropping quickly, you can expect a fairly intense, but often short-lived storm front to pass over.

I will often have a page of "refuge" harbors in the log of each passage leg—that notes the ATONs I should expect to see, as well as the rough course and distances I should expect to run if I were to need to enter one of these harbors. These notes would also include any important warnings, like the presence of a large, mostly submerged breakwater northeast of Rockport Harbor, and notes about the harbor and what conditions it would be good for, not good for—like noting that Tarpaulin Cove is only good if the wind is out of the North-NorthWest or West... and rather unprotected, especially with winds out of the east, or that Great Misery Island can have lots of mosquitoes at it...

In the case of heavy weather, I'll usually write notes of what the conditions were and how they were dealt with... this is usually done after the fact... but mainly serves as a record of what worked, what didn't and what could be improved.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 05-05-2009
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 1,886
Thanks: 7
Thanked 26 Times in 23 Posts
Rep Power: 10
nolatom will become famous soon enough
You're talking about a "sailing experience" log, I assume.

I don't think there's any proper or improper form, and I've never heard of any guidelines for them. Occasionally as a part-time instructor, I'm asked to fill in log pages from the ASA booklet, which I do.

Re: charter operators, I have limited experience with them, but I think most of them depend primarily on a verbal interview with you, then on the card (like ASA or USSA), and then on the logbook. Mostly, they rely on your credit card.

Others may have more up-to-date knowledge, in which case, listen to them...
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 05-05-2009
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 1,886
Thanks: 7
Thanked 26 Times in 23 Posts
Rep Power: 10
nolatom will become famous soon enough
hello Dog,

I have assumed this question is directed to a personal experience log, rather than a boat/ship's log. So that's how it tried to answer it, however imperfectly.

For a boat log, yours is an excellent answer.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 05-05-2009
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Glendale, CA
Posts: 25
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Shadrak is on a distinguished road
Thanks, sailingdog and nolatom. Your answers have left me with new questions!

What's the difference between a personal experience log and a ship log?

Considering that I'll only be sailing vessels of up to 26' in the near future, and only near-shore half-day sails, I'm guessing I don't need a ship log. Am I right in doing so?

My main interest is in recording my experience for future reference by a charter company, or to prepare a resume. It might also be useful if I want to volunteer as someone's crew, no? And, of course, as my own personal reference for future sails or simply memories.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 05-05-2009
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 1,886
Thanks: 7
Thanked 26 Times in 23 Posts
Rep Power: 10
nolatom will become famous soon enough
Primarily, a personal experience (teaching) log stays with you, and belongs to you.

A boat log belongs to the boat, and stays with the boat. No reason you can't do both. But the teaching log sort of assumes that you're the student, while the boat log is filled out by the skipper, who may not be you if you're still the student.

A boat log stays with the boat. A personal experience log (something I never did, except to qualify for a Coast Guard license) stays with you.

Hope this of assistance...
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 05-05-2009
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Nolatom—

There's no reason you couldn't keep a personal log with the suggestions I made. It isn't restricted to a ship's log... and would make a very neat personal memento of all the different boats you sail or crew upon. Especially if you can get photos and signatures of the people you make a passage with.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 05-05-2009
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 260
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 6
bb74 is on a distinguished road
A boat log's main purpose is for insurance reasons and to show that human error was the least likely cause of the incident - keeping a complete and up to date log book lets the insurance company and coast guard reverse the chronology of the incident and helps explain what perhaps could have been avoided. Typically before heading out you would note the most recent weather bulletin, a review of the mechanical situation, current mileage, location, destination, crew and any possible crew issues. After that any change of course, sail plan, anchoring, crew updates, etc along the way with the weather updates. If your log book shows you checked the motor in the morning and the previous days and you end up with a dead motor and need a tow in for whatever reason your insurance will likely cover the expense as it is an "accident". If your log book says nice sky's and sweet margaritas, it's coming out of your pocket because the same accident will be considered neglect....regardless of whether you check the motor or not....
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 05-06-2009
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Florida, US northeast
Posts: 100
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
Dick Pluta is on a distinguished road
One good reason is to document your experience. In addition to charter companies, there are experience requirements for the Coast Guard licenses. It makes life a lot easier if you want to get the Six Pack if you have written evidence of your days on the water.

Dick Pluta
AEGEA
On the hard in Florida
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 05-06-2009
jackdale's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Calgary, AB, Canada
Posts: 8,922
Thanks: 27
Thanked 52 Times in 49 Posts
Rep Power: 6
jackdale will become famous soon enough
Spreadsheet

I keep my personal log on a spreadsheet that permits me to track the vessels I have been on, my role, my distances, instructor hours, night hours, and locale. When asked for my resume, I send that.

Jack
__________________
__________________
ISPA Yachtmaster Offshore Instructor Evaluator
Sail Canada Advanced Cruising Instructor
IYT Yachtmaster Coastal Instructor
ASA 201, 203, 204, 205, 206, 214
As I sail, I praise God, and care not. (Luke Foxe)
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Shaft Log Leak (Pics) nk235 Gear & Maintenance 31 05-06-2009 06:32 PM
Log Books JohnnyReb General Discussion (sailing related) 52 04-24-2008 10:29 PM
The Log Investigates - Abandoned Boats Plague Mission Bay in Wake - The Log Newspaper NewsReader News Feeds 0 03-08-2007 03:15 PM
Standard SL-1 Digital Speed Log WindCheck Gear & Maintenance 1 04-05-2006 07:13 PM
Log in Records Early and Often Tom Wood Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 09-27-1999 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:06 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.