Different types of Cutter rigged boats - SailNet Community
 
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post #1 of 6 Old 10-03-2009 Thread Starter
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Different types of Cutter rigged boats

Ok so I understand how a normal cutter rigged boat has both a jib and stay sail furling system. But I'm looking at some boats on yachtworld that appear to be modified Sloops that have a removable staysail wire where a stail sail can be attached to it. My questions are: (1) How is the staysail attached to the wire and how is it deployed? (2) I'm assuming that the masts on these boats are set up for Sloops (ie: further towards the bow), so how does that affect the rig compared to a normal cutter that has its mast in the center. (3) Is this a healthy alternative to the traditional cutter rigged boat?
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post #2 of 6 Old 10-04-2009
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Originally Posted by delecto View Post
Ok so I understand how a normal cutter rigged boat has both a jib and stay sail furling system. But I'm looking at some boats on yachtworld that appear to be modified Sloops that have a removable staysail wire where a stail sail can be attached to it. My questions are: (1) How is the staysail attached to the wire and how is it deployed? (2) I'm assuming that the masts on these boats are set up for Sloops (ie: further towards the bow), so how does that affect the rig compared to a normal cutter that has its mast in the center. (3) Is this a healthy alternative to the traditional cutter rigged boat?
I can answer one of these... From the cutter rigs that I have seen (that do not use a second furling setup) the Stay sail would be hanked onto the wire.

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post #3 of 6 Old 10-04-2009
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This is not a healthy alternative. The inner forestay of the cutter rig should be reinforced by other stays to hold the mast. Normally the inner forestay of a cutter rigged boat is used alone in heavy weather. An inner forestay attached to a sloop rig will not be strong enough. You can use it with light air. Another alternative might be slutter rig which means you attach the top of the inner forestay to the top or near top of the mast. This way you will have an inner forestay which is strong enough.
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post #4 of 6 Old 10-04-2009 Thread Starter
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So you are talking about two back stays? I'm looking at a bunch of10-15 year old Crealocks and many of them seem to have this Sloop/Cutter Option rigging system. Judging by the refits and everything done on these boats there's no reason to think that the rigging would have been done improperly. I'm just trying to understand how it all works.
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post #5 of 6 Old 10-04-2009
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delecto,

I have a sloop rigged boat that uses a convertible inner forestay.

1) the "cutter sail" is hanked on to the inner forestay.
2) you are correct, the mast is in a conventional sloop rig placement, i.e. slightly forward of a true cutter rigged boat.
3) It is good alternative to a cutter rig. It allows the flexibility to use shortened sail in brisk winds (30-40-kt), and keep the forces of the sail close to the center of resistance of the boat. There is of course good reason to not have two stays on the foredeck - which will be apparent with every tack that you take using the headsail which you will fly > 95% of the time.

By the way... "An inner forestay attached to a sloop rig will not be strong enough". You can use it with light air."

The whole purpose of the inner forestay is heavy wind - the mast support is augmented with running backstays while using the "cutter sail".

The "cutter sail" rigged to the inner forestay will easily outperform any partially furled headsail (even one with a foam luff shaper) in brisk winds. In normal conditions (i.e. >95% of the time) having a clear foredeck on which to easily tack a jib or genoa makes the convertible stay a "healthy alternative" to the cutter, precisely because you can get rid of it!

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post #6 of 6 Old 10-04-2009 Thread Starter
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So you have a boat that maintains the performace of a traditional sloop but has the cutter option for heavy winds. That all makes sense considering the fact that the boats I'm looking at are fitted for blue water cruising. One of them even has its Ullman stay sail condition listed as "never used." Here are the two boats I'm considering for purchase:

34' Crealock 1994
34' Crealock 1998
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