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  #11  
Old 12-18-2009
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If you get the right 30' boat, it may be the only boat you ever need. I know there's lots of sailors out there that believe it takes a bigger boat to go places - but the bigger the boat the less it gets sailed and the more expensive everything on it is.
Paloma is about 30', we moved down to her many years ago from a 37' boat. We've taken her on many long jaunts - Galveston to Vera Cruz, Puerto Isabella to Freeport and more - and sometimes in terrible weather. In the worst of storms, I thought, a bigger boat would be much harder to handle.
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  #12  
Old 12-19-2009
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Personally, I always get funny feelings about wooden hulls that get covered (with glass or otherwise). Not sure I like that. It's not my area of expertise, though. Make sure you get a surveyor that really knows wooden boats to evaluate it for you. I generally think of maintenance costs as being somewhat relative to displacement, but what matters most is how well the previous owner maintained her.
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  #13  
Old 12-19-2009
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night0wl,

Thanks for the cost breakout.
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Old 01-05-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Polypterus View Post
First off, thanks for all the advice guys!

I plan to be sailing in the San Francisco bay. When I get some experience hopefully I can venture out the golden gate bridge.

I suppose I could start with a sloop and then move to a schooner later, if there is some good reason for it, but on the other hand I'd have a hard time plunking down a lot of money on a boat that doesn't appeal to me that much. I have seen a few sloops I like so perhaps that's an option. I'm just not real fond of most modern looking hull shapes that much.

Mike, I did indeed see a few Lazy Jack 32s and have bookmarked a couple. However the boat I really like best so far is a "30' Custom Gaff Rig Schooner" on yachtworld.com (sorry it won't let me post a link).

Any thoughts?
Poly,
Sailing on SF Bay is one of the greater joys one can experience in the day to day sailing world, and it sure would look good in a small schooner. That said, you'll be regularly sailing often in 20+ kts of wind that while pretty much a 'no big deal' for locals, can be pretty intimidating for someone new to sailing. There are a number of older used sloop rigged boats on the Bay that would be a great platform to learn on. Whatever you'll be sailing, remember that the Bay is harder on gear than most places, so budget not only for moorage, but for maintaining running rigging, standing rigging, and sails.

If you're looking for a wood boat in the Bay area, look up Kent Parker when you're to the point you need a survey.

Last edited by puddinlegs; 01-05-2010 at 03:34 PM.
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Old 01-06-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by puddinlegs View Post
Poly,
Sailing on SF Bay is one of the greater joys one can experience in the day to day sailing world, and it sure would look good in a small schooner. That said, you'll be regularly sailing often in 20+ kts of wind that while pretty much a 'no big deal' for locals, can be pretty intimidating for someone new to sailing. There are a number of older used sloop rigged boats on the Bay that would be a great platform to learn on. Whatever you'll be sailing, remember that the Bay is harder on gear than most places, so budget not only for moorage, but for maintaining running rigging, standing rigging, and sails.

If you're looking for a wood boat in the Bay area, look up Kent Parker when you're to the point you need a survey.
Actually I've kind of given up on the schooner idea for now. Everyone and their mother have been telling me it isn't a good boat for the bay and they are a pain in the ass in general. Too bad because they look so cool. In any case I've now moved on to an old sloop (the one I asked about in my other thread) that everyone and their mother is also telling me is a bad choice but for different reasons. I'm determined to make the worst choice possible
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Old 01-06-2010
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Is everyone and their mother actually a sailor with a lot of experience on a schooner? I doubt it. Maybe you've been talking to folks who know what they're talking about, but I'd make sure their opinions are backed up by real experience.

Amazon.com: Scow Schooners of San Francisco Bay (Local History Studies Vol 33) (9780935089127): Roger R. Olmsted, Nancy Olmsted: Books
San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park - Alma (U.S. National Park Service)
schooners san francisco bay - Google Images
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  #17  
Old 01-06-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Polypterus View Post
Actually I've kind of given up on the schooner idea for now. Everyone and their mother have been telling me it isn't a good boat for the bay and they are a pain in the ass in general. Too bad because they look so cool. In any case I've now moved on to an old sloop (the one I asked about in my other thread) that everyone and their mother is also telling me is a bad choice but for different reasons. I'm determined to make the worst choice possible

Don't give up completely on your dream. Owning a boat is 1/2 dream and 1/2 brutal reality (ok, so the reality part is 99.9% of the work...). This is not like a car purchase (although if you asked this community whether you should buy the VW beetle you love or the Silverado pickup you might be better off with, you would find equally heated arguments on the merits of the pickup).

In my humble opinion, if you are going to jump in with a 30' boat, you must buy a boat you fall in love with for your first boat. You will be committed to it, and will learn more about boat owning and maintenance if you love the boat. If you really want a schooner, you can find one you like. On the other hand, during your search, be open to other styles that catch your eye and learn about these too. The main thing is to not let any of us crush your dream completely (just dent it in a little). Good luck, and let us know what you eventually end up with.
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  #18  
Old 06-10-2010
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The bigger the boat, the EASIER it is to sail.
I recommend a catalina 30, mid 80's vintage.
It meets all your criteria, except beauty.
However, beauty is in the eye of the beholder...I used to think the tanzer 22 was an ugly duckling, until I owned one and realized it's funny looks were based on brilliant design.
Good luck.
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