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  #11  
Old 12-18-2009
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In big waves or a steep chop, I have long been a fan of using comparatively light nylon line for the preventer and running it from the end of the boom to a block near the bow and then back to a quick release cleat in the cockpit. The long length of nylon line allows the line to stretch and absorb the shock if the boom accidentally dips and prevents the kind of damage that George B mentions. The cleat in the cockpit allows the boom to be eased over during a deathroll without endangering the crew. This is a cheap and easy way to rig a preventer, and one that can be left rigged 24/7 when offshore.

I strongly disagee with the popular practice of taking a tackle to the rail below the boom as a preventer. In heavy going, if you dip the boom or death roll, you are likely to damage the hull to deck joint, toerail track, the boom and/or gooseneck, depending on the specifics of the situation.

Jeff
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  #12  
Old 12-18-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeB View Post
The best preventer is a good helmsman. On the way to Hawaii we occasionally used a preventer attached to the perforated toe rail track which included a 1/4 “fuse” line. On our only accidental gybe, the little fuse refused to break (we were on a 13 ton 44 footer)wherein it promptly ripped up about eight inches of perforated toe rail. Svendsen’s and the owner are still trying to work out a satisfactory repair.

IMHO, the “classic” mid boom to midship preventer should be only used in those light air and choppy water days to control the up and down boom movement and not the side to side. They say the best way is run a line from the tip of the boom up to a block at the bow and back to the cockpit (so it can be adjusted.) Unfortunately, the “lazy” preventer line can take out a crewmember as it gybes across. The Navy 44’s have this nifty attachment at the boom making it easier to detach the preventer prior to a gybe. I’ve only seen a similar set up on a couple of other big boats. I understand that preventers are mainly East Coast things and the "fast is fun" crowd her in the west generally shuns them.

I am a firm believer in a spinnaker net. It works amazingly well to protect against headstay wraps allowing the helmsman to concentrate on keeping the boat balanced on waves and the boom on the correct side.
Cool. Thanks GB. I found this "boom brake" set up via this thread:

http://www.sailnet.com/forums/learning-sail/23314-using-preventers-question.html

Is this kind of what you're talking about?
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  #13  
Old 12-18-2009
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Is this the death roll of which you speak?



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  #14  
Old 12-18-2009
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that is what happens when you do a "here, hold my beer watch this " in 30 something knots of wind with a double reef, and an accidental full to one side over to the other side of the boat in .1 secs! Fortunetly, there were no heads in the way!

Jibing in high winds is not a big deal, there were 4-5 other jibes with a full main in the same conditions with not issues earlier in the 8 mile run. Uncontrolled ones are the issues in higher winds.

I will do as others, as we start to hit the 180 range, sometimes jibe the jib first, go wing on wing, then pull in the main and jibe it as slowly as reasonable so things do not break throw you around etc. But as shown, even a double reef in a main in high winds, things go "breaky!"

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Old 12-18-2009
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Smack, how do you come up with all those vids? They really liven up the work day. Those boats didn’t have a chance to death roll – they went straight to round down and “died there”. Death rolls require a little side to side action before going down and have an even chance of ending in round up. Round downs never finish pretty. The spin gear is on the wrong side of the boat for recovery, boat pointed in the wrong direction, sail away from the boat and hard as hell to pull back on board. Funny, Zamazan rounded down in the exact same spot in this year’s BBS. The red boat in the second vid is Ah! Caliente! which I used to race against during my Aerodyne days. Good times.
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Old 12-18-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smackdaddy View Post
Is this the death roll of which you speak?
Ahh!!! "The Slot" on a summer's afternoon. How I miss it.
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  #17  
Old 12-18-2009
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Summer nothing! BBS is second half of September when the summer winds have abated into those gentle breezes of fall! All this kite flying is getting my blood up – I think I’ll try to talk Mrs. B into a little kite action this Sunday.
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  #18  
Old 12-18-2009
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Smack, how do you come up with all those vids? They really liven up the work day.
What, like this? I call this one "Glad I Ain't RailMeat"...reef schmeef.



It's good to be the boss. But, jeez, if my employees knew what I did all day they'd hang me.

Now let me get back to work.
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  #19  
Old 12-18-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeB View Post
Summer nothing! BBS is second half of September when the summer winds have abated into those gentle breezes of fall!
I guess I've been south of Pt. Conception for too long.
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Old 12-18-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smackdaddy View Post
...reef schmeef.





Yeah, that's about right
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