Storm jib questions - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Learning to Sail
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 01-08-2010
BubbleheadMd's Avatar
Chastened
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Edgewater/Annapolis
Posts: 2,864
Thanks: 1
Thanked 56 Times in 52 Posts
Rep Power: 5
BubbleheadMd will become famous soon enough
Send a message via Yahoo to BubbleheadMd
Storm jib questions

If I were to have a storm jib made up for my boat, what is the typical percent-size? Or do you specify a size when you have one made based on the specifications of your boat?

What are they typically made of, as compared to a working jib? Are they less or more expensive than a working jib?

I have an older boat, without a roller furling, and I actually don't want to install one (for now, anyways). I'm just trying to keep things mechanically uncomplicated.

I'm thinking one of these may be useful for the Chesapeake summers.

Here are my rig dimensions: Coronado 25 dimensions
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 01-08-2010
ASA and PSIA Instructor
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Posts: 3,447
Thanks: 6
Thanked 17 Times in 17 Posts
Rep Power: 15
sailingfool will become famous soon enough
the storm jib is really a sail for survival conditions, I had one on my last boat and in ten years never founfd myyself in conditions where I needed to use it.

A small jib like a 85% is a very nice item to have though...that got used a lot!
__________________
Certified...in several regards...
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 01-08-2010
JohnRPollard's Avatar
Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Chesapeake
Posts: 5,680
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 10
JohnRPollard is a jewel in the rough JohnRPollard is a jewel in the rough JohnRPollard is a jewel in the rough
Bublehead,

Unless you're planning to head out to Bermuda, invest your money elsewhere. You will get no use out of a storm jib on the Chesapeake. As SF said, and I mentioned in a previous post, storm jibs are for near-survival conditions off-shore. Coastal sailors will be holed-up before conditions get to the point where storm sails are called for.

During the summer, Chesapeake winds tend to be light-to-moderate, occasionally punctuated by a summer squall. Your best approach in the high-wind thunder squalls is to stow sails for a few minutes while the storm passes. Even with a storm jib aboard, by the time you strike the working sail and set the storm jib to fly, the high winds will have passed.

A smallish jib in the 90-100% range would come in useful during the autumn or spring times when winds tend to be heavier. Am I remembering correctly that you already have one in that size range?
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Pacific Seacraft Crealock 31 #62

NEVER CALLS CRUISINGDAD BACK....CAN"T TAKE THE ACCENT
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 01-08-2010
BubbleheadMd's Avatar
Chastened
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Edgewater/Annapolis
Posts: 2,864
Thanks: 1
Thanked 56 Times in 52 Posts
Rep Power: 5
BubbleheadMd will become famous soon enough
Send a message via Yahoo to BubbleheadMd
Yes, I have one in that size. I think it's 100%. Hey, it's great to be told that I don't have to buy something!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 01-08-2010
deniseO30's Avatar
Move over Joan Rivers!
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Bristol pa
Posts: 6,145
Thanks: 52
Thanked 89 Times in 79 Posts
Rep Power: 9
deniseO30 will become famous soon enough deniseO30 will become famous soon enough
a couple of years ago my son and I got caught in one of those squalls when we were up near still pond. My gawd! I was actually sailing a reach. (one of the few times I actually got the wheel away from my adrenalin junkie son)
he said.. "see that?" see what?? the clouds are coming over fast! "nah" said I. "better roll em in!" he said! wake up Denise! this is the young man that loves sailing with the rail dipped and he's telling me to roll em in? Well no sooner did we get the sails down and engine running we were in like 6ft waves! yee haw! it was fun but brutal with the bow crashing. finally we made it into a cove and dropped the hook to wait it out. but got bored after a couple of hours and motored up to ordinary point as the conditions eased up.

Don't think I'd ever want a storm jib or have the time to deploy one on such short notice.
__________________
Denise, Bristol PA, Oday 30. On Tidal Delaware River, Anchor Yacht Club. New Website!
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

my current "project"!
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 01-08-2010
MarkCK's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 478
Thanks: 2
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 6
MarkCK is on a distinguished road
I have an off the rack storm jib. It was intended for a boat a lot bigger than what I have. Basically I bought it for a really small jib when the wind conditions dictate. I never bought it with the intent to use it as a survival sail. Its probably not the best choice in sails but it works great for what I use it for.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 01-08-2010
imagine2frolic's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 1,831
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 7
imagine2frolic is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by deniseO30 View Post
a couple of years ago my son and I got caught in one of those squalls when we were up near still pond. My gawd! I was actually sailing a reach. (one of the few times I actually got the wheel away from my adrenalin junkie son)
he said.. "see that?" see what?? the clouds are coming over fast! "nah" said I. "better roll em in!" he said! wake up Denise! this is the young man that loves sailing with the rail dipped and he's telling me to roll em in? Well no sooner did we get the sails down and engine running we were in like 6ft waves! yee haw! it was fun but brutal with the bow crashing. finally we made it into a cove and dropped the hook to wait it out. but got bored after a couple of hours and motored up to ordinary point as the conditions eased up.

Don't think I'd ever want a storm jib or have the time to deploy one on such short notice.
This is why I love my cutter. Roll up the genny, and unfurl the stysail. .........i2f
__________________
20 MPH ain't fast unless, you do it in a 1000sq 3/2 house on 10foot waves
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


BORROWED, No single one of us is as smart as all of us!
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 01-08-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 1,866
Thanks: 6
Thanked 23 Times in 21 Posts
Rep Power: 10
nolatom will become famous soon enough
It would be made of dacron, same as your working jib, except *really* heavy, say 9-10 ounce cloth weight, versus about 3-4 oz for your weekend jib.

Also much smaller, say about half the size of your working jib, it would cover only about 30-40% or the foretriangle, maybe less. Basically, you want just enough jib to balance out a storm trysail, so you can bear off when you need to and not have too much weather helm.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 01-08-2010
blt2ski's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 6,694
Thanks: 0
Thanked 21 Times in 20 Posts
Rep Power: 10
blt2ski will become famous soon enough
I'm going to put the do you need a storm jib from a "maybe" standpoint. If you sail as Denise did on her day out with her son, the chance you will need a SJ is slim or none!

"IF" on the other hand you end up racing as I do. An SJ can be a help, or as mentioned, a sail in the 60-80% range vs a SJ at 30-40% of the fortriangle area. I find with a double reef with winds above 30-35 my SJ is nice to have. On the other hand, I will admit, it would be nice to have something tween the SJ and my 110, ie about a 70-80% sail.

The do you or do you not, frankly, will depend upon "YOUR" useage of your boat in what seasons conditions etc. I sail all year here in Puget Sound, and have found myself caught racing in some 30+ winds, a small jib is nice to have. If not, you turn on the iron genoa in these conditions, then a SJ si not really needed. So put me in the "DEPENDS" vote end of things.

Marty
__________________
She drives me boat,
I drives me dinghy!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 01-08-2010
pdqaltair's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Deale, MD
Posts: 2,188
Thanks: 1
Thanked 31 Times in 31 Posts
Rep Power: 6
pdqaltair is on a distinguished road
Second hand storm sails are a great value.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BubbleheadMd View Post
If I were to have a storm jib made up for my boat, what is the typical percent-size? Or do you specify a size when you have one made based on the specifications of your boat?

What are they typically made of, as compared to a working jib? Are they less or more expensive than a working jib?

I have an older boat, without a roller furling, and I actually don't want to install one (for now, anyways). I'm just trying to keep things mechanically uncomplicated.

I'm thinking one of these may be useful for the Chesapeake summers.

Here are my rig dimensions: Coronado 25 dimensions
Many have never been used, and you won't use it in a "real" storm.

A storm sail is NOT just a small jib. It is heavier cloth. More importantly, it is cut high on the foot and is very flat. This is IMPORTANT. The high foot makes it easy to get the sail flat and it keeps it from taking your ear off. It must be flat because you cannot feather a full-cut sail. For this reason, self tacking jibs make poor storm sails - they are hard to flatten and are cut low on the foot.
__________________
(when asked how he reached the starting holds on a difficult rock climbing problem that clearly favored taller climbers - he was perhaps 5'5")

"Well, I just climb up to them."

by Joe Brown, English rock climber




To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Using Storm Sails Brian Hancock Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 02-16-2004 07:00 PM
Sailing Under the Storm Trysail Dobbs Davis Seamanship Articles 0 08-31-2002 08:00 PM
Sail Trim Steve Colgate Learning to Sail Articles 0 05-10-2000 08:00 PM
Sail Trim Steve Colgate Seamanship Articles 0 05-10-2000 08:00 PM
Sail Trim Steve Colgate Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 05-10-2000 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:34 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.