Just a question for experienced sailors - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Learning to Sail
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 02-07-2010
sailguy40's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 306
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 5
sailguy40 is on a distinguished road
Just a question for experienced sailors

Say you are out in a bay or lake several miles and the wind dies down to nearly nothing, do you motor all the way back at this point? I am wondering how much wind a sailboat actually needs to keep moving along without motoring? For example, a 25ft sailboat which I have and have not sailed it yet. Also, it seems to me that if both a mainsail and jib are up the sailboat will move along faster because two sails are up and going, am I correct?
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 02-07-2010
Zanshin's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Germany
Posts: 2,179
Thanks: 0
Thanked 14 Times in 14 Posts
Rep Power: 9
Zanshin is on a distinguished road
Your speed in the boat is not only affected by the wind speed but also its direction. Running straight downwind is going to be slow, no matter how much sail you put up you will never reach windspeed. On a broad reach you can go faster than the true wind.
The answer to your question is relative to the amount of hurry you are in. I've found that if my speed goes below about 2-3knots I now turn on the engine and motorsail, but that is personal preference. When crossing an ocean the amount of fuel is limited, so sailboats stuck in the doldrums with nary a breath of wind for days upon end sometimes don't have the fuel reserves to turn on the engine but must sit out the still air.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 02-07-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 2,543
Thanks: 3
Thanked 17 Times in 15 Posts
Rep Power: 13
Sailormon6 will become famous soon enough
As long as there is any reasonably discernible movement of air, a sailboat can sail. In light air, the boat might not be going very fast, but it can sail. The decision as to when you should continue sailing and when you should give it up and start the motor is primarily governed by your own time parameters, i.e., how much time are you willing to spend in travelling a short distance? Sailing in light air is a special skill that many sailors have not yet learned. but people who know how to sail in light air enjoy it for the challenge.

Generally, a sloop is designed to sail most quickly and efficiently with both sails. However, depending on the conditions, it might sail to your satisfaction with only one sail. In a strong wind, it might actually sail better with only one sail. In that case, using both sails might overpower the boat and make it difficult to control.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 02-07-2010
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Another consideration to keep in mind is current. If you sail on salt water, the tidal currents can determine whether sailing is feasible or not. If you have an outgoing tidal current of 3 knots and only a 4 knot sea breeze, chances are pretty good you won't be sailing back...
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 02-07-2010
nickmerc's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: O'Fallon, MO
Posts: 563
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 6
nickmerc is on a distinguished road
It also depends on your sail inventory. If you have sails made of lighter material you will have an easier time sailing in very light air since the sail will take on a better shape sooner than a heavier material.

One other big issue for me on a lake or bay is the power boats. They are a huge PITA when the try to help by slowing down as they go by. It just makes thier wake bigger if they come off of planing. Whatever headway you are making will be ruined by a few wakes. Plus it beats your rigging and sails up.

I enjoy light air sailing. As mentioned above it is a skill most sailors have not honed. The skills also transfer to heavier winds as you can gain more speed by knowing how to trim sails and balance your boat.
________
Ocean View Condos

Last edited by nickmerc; 08-18-2011 at 06:02 AM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 02-07-2010
jrd22's Avatar
Courtney the Dancer
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: San Juan Islands., WA, USA
Posts: 3,820
Thanks: 3
Thanked 16 Times in 16 Posts
Rep Power: 14
jrd22 will become famous soon enough
You are correct about both sails moving the boat more effectively than just one in light winds. As you do more sailing you will determine your own "iron jenny" rule, most people tend to fire up the engine if boat speed drops below 2- 3 knots or so. Drifting along on a sunny day with no wind, just waiting for a little breeze can be pretty nice though if you don't have time constraints.
__________________
John
SV Laurie Anne

1988 Brewer 40 Pilothouse

Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 02-07-2010
jaschrumpf's Avatar
1975 Newport 28
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Monrovia, MD
Posts: 573
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 13
jaschrumpf is on a distinguished road
I follow the wisdom of the skipper who taught my ASA 103 course: "I refuse to wallow."
__________________
S/V Free Spirit

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Monrovia, MD
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 02-07-2010
Two many boats!
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Bowie MD
Posts: 126
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 5
degreeoff is on a distinguished road
I have no issues just making 2-3 knots.....less than that is bad......Also I find the crew tend to not like the "wallowing....;-P"
__________________
I love to sail, coming from a Swordboat capt's loin one would think I'd of caught the bug long before now! Oh well, this ones for you Bisque...(My Father may he RIP)

Now If I could only stay away from working on the damn things I could sail more!
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Current boat...
-1985 c-30 TR DONE!! after two new engines and too much labor she floats sails and steams....
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 02-07-2010
jackdale's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Calgary, AB, Canada
Posts: 8,923
Thanks: 27
Thanked 52 Times in 49 Posts
Rep Power: 6
jackdale will become famous soon enough
So far everyone is right. Point of sail, sail inventory, etc. all make a difference. So does the type of the boat. A big, heavy full-keel boat will not the make the same light air speed as a light fin-keel race boat.
__________________
__________________
ISPA Yachtmaster Offshore Instructor Evaluator
Sail Canada Advanced Cruising Instructor
IYT Yachtmaster Coastal Instructor
ASA 201, 203, 204, 205, 206, 214
As I sail, I praise God, and care not. (Luke Foxe)
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 02-08-2010
Cal28's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 187
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 6
Cal28 is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Another consideration to keep in mind is current. If you sail on salt water, the tidal currents can determine whether sailing is feasible or not. If you have an outgoing tidal current of 3 knots and only a 4 knot sea breeze, chances are pretty good you won't be sailing back...
Feeling very good .. aware that in some measure I am learning ..

I read down this post .. and wanted to add tidal currents .. before I saw that sailingdog had already talked about this ... as I spent close to 7 hours on San Francisco Bay today .. some of it (but not much) wallowing .. most of it sailing .. abit of it .. trying to sail back just as sailingdog described .. sitting on my Cal 28 at the moment .. reviewing the lessons I learned today ..

I would like to recommend that you get a copy of David Seidman's book, The Complete Sailor .. I've read it cover to cover now 3 times .. and continue to learn .. and am just starting to understand ..
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Dumping on Sailors Don Casey Seamanship Articles 0 08-15-2002 08:00 PM
Taking the Pulse of Junior Racing Dan Dickison Racing Articles 0 06-27-2001 08:00 PM
A Sailor's Guide to the Gods John Kretschmer Seamanship Articles 0 04-26-2001 08:00 PM
A Sailor's Guide to the Gods John Kretschmer Cruising Articles 0 04-26-2001 08:00 PM
Optimist Regatta Improves Young Sailors Zack Leonard Racing Articles 0 06-27-2000 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:56 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.