Almost lost my boat today - Page 3 - SailNet Community
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post #21 of 65 Old 02-13-2010
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Yikes....support that mast with your halyard ASAP. It can be fixed. Dont give up the ship so easily.

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post #22 of 65 Old 02-13-2010
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post #23 of 65 Old 02-13-2010
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Replacement parts--particularly the rub rail can be obtained from Seal's Spars and Rigging . Seal used to work for Jensen Marine--the original builder of the Cal's--and is very knowledgable about the boats. More important is determining if the loss of the rub rail is due to it simply being pulled off the edges of the deck/ hull joint molding (shaped like a T laid on its side standing proud of the hull) or whether the joint itself was damaged/broken which could be a serious problem.

If one of the spreaders is damaged, you'll have to determine whether it's actually the spreader or the mast fitting. Unfortunately, the original spreaders were made of Spruce and were subject to rot. Replacements made of Aluminum are available so the question is whether yours are/were original or were replaced at some point. If the spreader base fitting at the mast is damaged, that is a more problematic kettle of fish. Leave it be said that, absent intact spreaders, you're not going sailing. The good news is that the spar is light/short enough that with a friend or two to help, you can actually un-step the mast to effect repairs.

Given the questions you've asked, I think you need t do some reading and sign up for some sailing classes ASAP. You might want to start by watchng some of the videos available at the USSA Site (US SAILING Home ) and contacing them to find training programs in your area.

Good luck...

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post #24 of 65 Old 02-13-2010
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You've certainly been given the short end of the stick shipmate, but as someone said earlier- Don't give up the ship.

I'll hazard a guess that your mast is ok. Buy the spreader and the shroud and replace them and you'll be back in business.

You can either get some friends and unstep the mast (lower it) and make the repairs or you can use a halyard as an emergency shroud and use the other halyard to hoist yourself up in a bosun's chair, and make the repairs aloft.

To unstep the mast, you'll need to loosen the shrouds and the forestay and the backstay and detach the turnbuckles from their chainplates. The chainplates are the mounting points on the deck. The shrouds and stays are all the supporting wires (standing rigging).

You WILL need friends to help you with this. People need to use your shrouds or halyards to control any side-to-side motion the mast makes as it comes down. A come-along or winch can be used to provide the mechanical advantage you need to lower the mast in a controlled manner. Some people build a wooden A-frame to help with this.

After you lower the mast, and make the repairs, and get the mast back up, you'll need to "tune" your standing rigging. There actually is a method to this, you don't just crank all your shrouds and stays 'till they're tighter than a banjo string.

Don't be intimidated by all this. We all go through it. I'm going through it. You just have to read, study and learn. Find an experienced buddy if you can.

Here's some terminology to commit to memory:

Cross-bar: Spreader
Guy wires/supports: Shrouds, forestay, backstay, collectively referred to as "standing rigging" because it doesn't move.
Halyards: Lines used to hoist and lower sails.
Sheets: Lines used to trim sails
Running rigging: The halyards and sheets and other moving control lines.
Chainplates: Mounting points for the standing rigging. These often penetrate the deck, mounted to structural points below decks. (but not always)

Get thee to a bookstore and buy even a simple book on sailing to start with. Makes great bathroom reading.

Git 'er done.

S/V Old Shoes
1973 Pearson 30 #255
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post #25 of 65 Old 02-13-2010 Thread Starter
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Appreiciate the pointers guys. I got an estimate on repairs today from this place named northshore marine. It is a whopping $1800 of damages and what they quoted me for repairs. This is downright insane! I am not spending that kind of money already and I still don't have an outboard or nothing else. I literally don't need any parts other then a shroud or two, two halyards, and a rubrail. Why the hell is this so expensive? The guy tells me today, its a minor job but then he says its not cheap and comes up with darn near 2k! It don't make sense to me. I think I can fix the mast myself if I can get it off the boat. Anyone know how heavy this mast is? This darn thing seems to be pretty solid and I never measured it but to me it looks to be near 35 ft or more. Is it possible to take off with someone holding it or would I need a crane? I am nearly ready to go to the boat, take all my stuff off and say goodbye at this point. I will find out who done thisif that is the last thing I do, I will find them.
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post #26 of 65 Old 02-13-2010
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Sailguy, dude. Bubblehead gave you the perfect advice. Get help (not paid) and fix it yourself. Read, learn, and no. You dont need a crane. Just a controlled way to bring it down. Imagine 2 guys holding lines to lower it and keep it from swaying and a 3rd guy (you) with a long pole that has a "Y" at the top guiding it down.
You need to breathe, relax and take wise cousel. Fix your boat, move it to a safe amrina and enjoy it

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post #27 of 65 Old 02-13-2010 Thread Starter
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Quote:
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Sailguy, dude. Bubblehead gave you the perfect advice. Get help (not paid) and fix it yourself. Read, learn, and no. You dont need a crane. Just a controlled way to bring it down. Imagine 2 guys holding lines to lower it and keep it from swaying and a 3rd guy (you) with a long pole that has a "Y" at the top guiding it down.
You need to breathe, relax and take wise cousel. Fix your boat, move it to a safe amrina and enjoy it
Oh heck yes he did, I just noticed that I appreciate you pointing it out man. I was typing, got a phone call and must of posted just after he did.
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post #28 of 65 Old 02-13-2010
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Not sure how your marina is set up but if the ramp to the dock is high enough, I've been able to do spreader repairs just by parking next to it and work over the rail. Don't think you have huge tides there, do it on a calm day. I've even seen guys pull masts the same way, a bit of block and tackle, etc. Dockmaster may object so check first. May be it's a hazard of some sort, blocking the right of way or something. Your homeowners insurance may cover your boat, wouldn't hurt to ask. "The sun will come out tomorrow, bet your bottom dollar on tomorrow" Sturdy boat, sort of a huge cockpit but good choice for your area.
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post #29 of 65 Old 02-14-2010
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I just found this thread, Sailguy40, and you have my extreme sympathies. What you said about not messing with a person's boat is right on.

So, it was a crappy way to start out for sure, but luckily you've got some great advice from the many capable Sailnetters here. You take care of this problem, and you'll really be bonded with your Cal 25.

I hope you'll keep us in the loop as your fix progresses!

Tom K

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Northern Chesapeake Bay

Ambition is a poor excuse for not having enough sense to be lazy ~ Steven Wright
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post #30 of 65 Old 02-14-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by svHyLyte View Post
Replacement parts--particularly the rub rail can be obtained from Seal's Spars and Rigging . Seal used to work for Jensen Marine--the original builder of the Cal's--and is very knowledgable about the boats. More important is determining if the loss of the rub rail is due to it simply being pulled off the edges of the deck/ hull joint molding (shaped like a T laid on its side standing proud of the hull) or whether the joint itself was damaged/broken which could be a serious problem.

If one of the spreaders is damaged, you'll have to determine whether it's actually the spreader or the mast fitting. Unfortunately, the original spreaders were made of Spruce and were subject to rot. Replacements made of Aluminum are available so the question is whether yours are/were original or were replaced at some point. If the spreader base fitting at the mast is damaged, that is a more problematic kettle of fish. Leave it be said that, absent intact spreaders, you're not going sailing. The good news is that the spar is light/short enough that with a friend or two to help, you can actually un-step the mast to effect repairs.
svHyLyte


Thanks ... I have recently purchased a '67 Cal 28 flushdeck ... and on my project list is inspection of the standing rigging ... and "Seal's" is right here in my backyard ...

much appreciated ... learning more every day here ...

"It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
Antoine de Saint-Exupery
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