Beginner: Sailing Lessons and Certifications - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Learning to Sail
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 06-01-2010
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 3
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
bluefalcon is on a distinguished road
Beginner: Sailing Lessons and Certifications

Hi,

I lived on a small lake my entire life. I have sailed small boats, but I want to up the ante with larger boats in bigger bodies of water.

My goal is to be able to charter a large sailboat (single or multi hull) all over the world.

From my research I have learned there are two sailing certifications ASA and US Sailing. I have read they are identical. That being said ASA has an emphasis on day sailing and US Sailing is more racing. I have also heard that US Sailing helps determine sailing guidelines for the US. I don't care which one, I just want the one that will help me reach my goal. US Sailing is the one I am leaning toward, as the name seems to have more weight and racing could be something I do in the future. I like to compete.

In addition, I have heard that where you take sailing lessons might effect where or if you can charter a boat? Is this true?

Courses/certifications I have been looking at:
Basic Keelboat (prerequisite)
Basic Cruising (prerequisite)
Bareboat Cruising (The only one I really one)
Coastal Navigation (Seems VERY useful)

Bottom line, looking for the best place for me to learn to sail a boat in the Boston area. I don't mind going out to the Cape or driving up and down the coast. It is nice to escape the city. It would be great if it wasn't that expensive, but I would rather have a good education that is expensive than a no-so-good education at a cheap price.

Thank you!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 06-01-2010
Barquito's Avatar
Barquito
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 1,931
Thanks: 0
Thanked 14 Times in 14 Posts
Rep Power: 7
Barquito is on a distinguished road
I took ASA 101, 103, 104, and 105. All where very good training. That said, except for 105, I think I have learned more on this forum, and sailing my Catalina 22 than I did in all the classes. I think US Sailing and ASA courses help to compliment real world experiences.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 06-01-2010
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 3
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
bluefalcon is on a distinguished road
Barquito, good to know! Good to have some confirmation. If it were up to me, I would hunt for a great sailing book (Btw, does anyone know of one?), read it, and then start sailing at clubs and charter boats. From what I understand though you need a certification to charter a boat at many places throughout the world. To me getting a certification is to solidify my knowledge, but also as a right of passage to charter boats.

Nothing can take the place of practice, passion, and self learning.

Last edited by bluefalcon; 06-01-2010 at 10:45 AM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 06-01-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 1,860
Thanks: 6
Thanked 23 Times in 21 Posts
Rep Power: 10
nolatom will become famous soon enough
I wouldn't think that where you took lessons would have any effect on where you could charter a boat. Sailing is sailing, and navigation is navigation, wherever.

USSA is more racing-oriented, and is the US rep for national and int'l sailing competetion.

ASA is more cruising-oriented. But ultimately, the quality of your instructor is more important than which outfit they teach for.

And yes, you can learn it yourself, but a few lessons would help you in avoiding any bad habits you might otherwise have. I learned to sail from family, and by racing, cruising, and delivering boats. This was before anyone thought of an ASA or USSA or anything. Along the way I picked up a Coast Guard license. Now I teach part-time in an ASA program on weekends, so I've seen it from both sides, so to speak.

However you decide to learn, ask lots of questions, sail a lot (people always need crew), cruise a web site like this one, and best of luck.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 06-01-2010
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 3
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
bluefalcon is on a distinguished road
nolatom, good points.

To be crew for someones boat would a US Sailing or ASA certification + experience suffice or is a US Coast Guard License better?

All these licenses and courses are a bit confusing. I would like to spend money toward the most versatile.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 06-01-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 1,908
Thanks: 4
Thanked 30 Times in 30 Posts
Rep Power: 8
Tempest is on a distinguished road
Hi Bluefalcon,

For chartering, what you want to do is build a resume. You can certainly begin with the time served upon your own vessel.

For sail charters, ASA or US sailing Certifications will help. You would certainly want to build up to the Bareboat Chatering and Coastal cruising certs. Other than the sail endorsement coast guard license classes don't cover sailing very well. ( The CG sail endorsement class is a breeze)

I teach ASA classes but US sailing certainly has an excellent reputation. As has been mentioned the instructor is the key, not all instructors are equal.

I pursued both paths. Coast Guard License and ASA certifications. I found the ASA instructors navigation test more difficult than the CG test.

Bottom line is that I would pursue both avenues starting with the ASA or US sailing classes. Log all your time, get signatures for any time served on vessels other than your own. ( on the Coast Guard form) The biggest obstacle to the coast guard license is sea-time. If you own your own vessel you can log your own time.
Most Coast Guard courses are about 9 days long, 2 full weekends and 5 evenings or some combination thereof.

I'm going to guess that all the classes you'll need for both ASA certifications and the Coast Guard will run you between $2500 and $3000.

For the Coast Guard license you will also need a TWIC card. Look up the requirements for that.

I'm in the NY, NJ area so I'm not familiar with courses in the Boston Area.
Check out Sea School for the Coast Guard classes. The ASA website will pinpoint the location of all their schools online. I'm sure US sailing will do the same.

When I've chartered with the Moorings in BVI they ask for a resume, then determine based on the resume what they're willing to let you bareboat.
I've heard that if they feel you're somewhat inexperienced they may ask you to take a captain for a day to get checked out. I can't speak to other charter companies practices.

Hope this helps.
__________________
Tempest
Sabre 34
Morgan, NJ
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 06-11-2010
PriorityCruiser's Avatar
Boatless Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Baton Rouge, LA
Posts: 4
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
PriorityCruiser is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolatom View Post
I wouldn't think that where you took lessons would have any effect on where you could charter a boat. Sailing is sailing, and navigation is navigation, wherever.

USSA is more racing-oriented, and is the US rep for national and int'l sailing competetion.

ASA is more cruising-oriented. But ultimately, the quality of your instructor is more important than which outfit they teach for.

And yes, you can learn it yourself, but a few lessons would help you in avoiding any bad habits you might otherwise have. I learned to sail from family, and by racing, cruising, and delivering boats. This was before anyone thought of an ASA or USSA or anything. Along the way I picked up a Coast Guard license. Now I teach part-time in an ASA program on weekends, so I've seen it from both sides, so to speak.

However you decide to learn, ask lots of questions, sail a lot (people always need crew), cruise a web site like this one, and best of luck.
nolatom,

If that ASA program you're involved with is on or near Lake Pontchartrain, I would be interested. What is the name of the training center?

Garrett
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 06-11-2010
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 9 Times in 9 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Given your preference for something in the Boston area, I'd highly recommend going with the Boston Sailing Center, which is based out of a boat on Boston Harbor. They have both a la carte or macro based offerings, where you can get everything from a basic ASA 101 learn-to-sail course up to the full coastal or passagemaking courses as a package.

One thing that is nice, is that their lessons and courses come with a short-term membership and allow you to sail different boats from their fleet, which includes J/24s, Olson 25s, Sonars, Solings, on up to a C&C and Bavaria 37s, and larger boats. No multihulls though.

I'd point out that one of my friends went through the courses at the BSC and was a member there for about two years. He went from buying a boat last April to cruising the Bahamas and coming back from the Bahamas in their own boat in just a year. I think that says a lot about the preparation and skills you can learn in a relatively short period of time.

I'd point out that one of my good friends is an instructor at the BSC as part full disclosure. He often teaches their cruising courses.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bluefalcon View Post
Hi,

I lived on a small lake my entire life. I have sailed small boats, but I want to up the ante with larger boats in bigger bodies of water.

My goal is to be able to charter a large sailboat (single or multi hull) all over the world.

From my research I have learned there are two sailing certifications ASA and US Sailing. I have read they are identical. That being said ASA has an emphasis on day sailing and US Sailing is more racing. I have also heard that US Sailing helps determine sailing guidelines for the US. I don't care which one, I just want the one that will help me reach my goal. US Sailing is the one I am leaning toward, as the name seems to have more weight and racing could be something I do in the future. I like to compete.

In addition, I have heard that where you take sailing lessons might effect where or if you can charter a boat? Is this true?

Courses/certifications I have been looking at:
Basic Keelboat (prerequisite)
Basic Cruising (prerequisite)
Bareboat Cruising (The only one I really one)
Coastal Navigation (Seems VERY useful)

Bottom line, looking for the best place for me to learn to sail a boat in the Boston area. I don't mind going out to the Cape or driving up and down the coast. It is nice to escape the city. It would be great if it wasn't that expensive, but I would rather have a good education that is expensive than a no-so-good education at a cheap price.

Thank you!
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.

Last edited by sailingdog; 06-11-2010 at 02:23 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 06-11-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 1,860
Thanks: 6
Thanked 23 Times in 21 Posts
Rep Power: 10
nolatom will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by PriorityCruiser View Post
nolatom,

If that ASA program you're involved with is on or near Lake Pontchartrain, I would be interested. What is the name of the training center?

Garrett

It's this one, on the south shore of the Lake:

Murray Yacht Sales, Inc.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:26 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.