docking procedures - Page 3 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Learning to Sail
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #21  
Old 06-11-2010
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Lower Mainland of British Columbia
Posts: 33
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
KeltiC is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by bljones View Post
You and he need to create an arrestor hook for your boat, sometimes known as a springline.
I assume you are back at the dock. I also assume that your BF's boat has an unused (or underused) cleat on the boat somewhere on the side alongside the dock. Insist that BF find or buy a line that will measure (with a lot left over) from that cleat to the dock cleat furthest out on the dock. Then insist that BF measure from the boat cleat to the dock cleat , attach the line to the dock cleat, and make a big loop on the other end of that line. This is now your "arrestor hook." when you come back to dock, the first thing you do is toss that big loop over th end cleat on the dock, and lo and behold, the boat snuggles right up to the dock like a piglet attaching to mama, and you can now bring the bow home with a dockline expertly snaring a cleat or a boathook, snagging a cleat. No yelling , no tears, everybody is happy and you look like an old salt.

It saved my marriage.

I'm sure this sounds like a great method....once I make some sense of this procedure! In the meantime, I'm going to do some 'googling' on springlines.
Thanks for that tip!

Last edited by Faster; 06-11-2010 at 10:51 AM. Reason: fixed quote
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #22  
Old 06-11-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 825
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 9
chris_gee is on a distinguished road
This doesn't sound too good. How much experience does the boyfriend have? As others have pointed out it is his responsibility and while it is good you want to learn, maybe he needs to get it together. That said things can go wrong especially when one is still learning the best way to do things. Getting fuel is his problem. Could be a bit tricky though in crowded conditions, limited space and crosswinds, especially as others may also not be in full control. Easier mid week. Presumably he has jerry cans?
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #23  
Old 06-11-2010
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Lower Mainland of British Columbia
Posts: 33
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
KeltiC is on a distinguished road
He moved here (BC) about 7 (?) yrs ago, from Ontario. Apparently he did quite a bit of sailing back east. But I'm not sure how much. He sailed with his wife (at the time) but I think mostly with a good buddy.
He told me that he had sailed a bit on his own first and then took a weekend course. Since moving to BC, he befriended a couple on the island and he sailed with them once.
Before taking the boat out on Sunday, we went in the dinghy to see where we'd have to go for fuel. It doesn't look like too bad a spot.
And 'no' he does not have jerry cans....is it possible to fill the boat using jerry cans? He's not sure how much fuel his boat will take b/c the gauge is not working.
We have no choice but to go on the weekend. He has every weekend off work and I only get every other weekend off. So this is the only time we get to the boat.

Last edited by KeltiC; 06-11-2010 at 12:06 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #24  
Old 06-11-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 666
Thanks: 1
Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Rep Power: 14
olson34 is on a distinguished road
Lightbulb Easy way to transfer fuel

Self Priming 1/2" Siphon / Syphon Hose - Gas, Oil, Water, & Aquarium Siphon

We have been using these little syphon assemblies all around our club for a couple of decades. An independent chandlery started selling them one time, and they really caught on.
No more trying to pour by lifting and tipping (and spilling from) a five gallon container.
Even in a moderate seaway offshore, you can tie the "jerry can" to the rail, and start the syphon by jigging it up 'n' down until the fuel flows into the deck fill.
Only limitation is that it will lose the syphon and leave an inch of diesel in bottom of the container... but that's not too bad.

(no connection with any product vendor, just a satisfied owner)

I was trying to find an illustration, and Googled up this link. There are probably others... and probably a lot of different suppliers from different fabricators.


L
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #25  
Old 06-11-2010
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Lower Mainland of British Columbia
Posts: 33
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
KeltiC is on a distinguished road
Awesome! Thanks for that link. I've sent it to my boyfriend.
We'll see what he thinks.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #26  
Old 06-11-2010
QuickMick's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: California
Posts: 1,381
Thanks: 0
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 5
QuickMick is on a distinguished road
if you have a dock mate willing to make a few practice runs, not neccessarily even out of the marina, it may help to have a more experienced hand on board to help out, or to go on their boat and have him/her walk you through their procedures.
__________________
How inappropriate to call this planet Earth when it is quite clearly Ocean ~ Arthur C. Clarke

Quinn McColly
Macgregor Venture
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #27  
Old 06-11-2010
bshipp's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Providence, RI
Posts: 49
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
bshipp is on a distinguished road
Any dock landing you can walk away from is a good dock landing

Take a women-only cruising course. There are a number of schools that offer them and they are a great way to learn the basics without the added complications of the relationship.
__________________
Brad
Bellerophon, 46' staysail ketch
"England expects that every man will do his duty."
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #28  
Old 06-11-2010
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 94
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
SeaFever2000 is on a distinguished road
Kelti,

If the fuel deck fill is in the cockpit sole and goes straight down to the tank, a simple method I have used on boats that don't have a fuel gauge, is to use a clean wooden stick long enough to reach the bottom of the tank and still stick out of the cockpit sole. Don't use a small one as you may loose it in the tank!... I lower the stick till it touched the bottom and then pull it out. The level of the fuel can be seen on the wooden stick. Once I fill up that tank, I check again with the stick and mark that level as 'F' for full. Then onwards it is easy to check how full the tank is. It is always a good idea to have a jerry-can of fuel handy for use in case of a bind. However if you regularly check your fuel level that is not necessary. I always advice people to check their fuel level before leaving the dock.

Hope that helps. Note the key factor in being able to use this method is that the passage goes from the deck fill straight done to the tank.

Also important to know on a new boat is what kind of fuel it uses. Gas or Diesel?! I always make sure I know that on a new boat!

BTW, what kind of a boat is it?

Last edited by SeaFever2000; 06-11-2010 at 12:01 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #29  
Old 06-11-2010
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Lower Mainland of British Columbia
Posts: 33
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
KeltiC is on a distinguished road
It uses deisel.
And its an older (not sure the year) Cooper Pilothouse.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #30  
Old 06-11-2010
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Lower Mainland of British Columbia
Posts: 33
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
KeltiC is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by scraph View Post
I'd agree with you on GPS ... but depth sounder is a pretty critical piece of equipment in a lot of areas ... Charleston Harbour for example.
He has a chart to back up the gps...but since we'd never been out in this area before...he thought the depth sounder was pretty important.
I tend to agree, as well....even as a novice!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
When Docking, Easy Does It Bruce Caldwell Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 08-16-2004 08:00 PM
When Docking, Easy Does It Bruce Caldwell Her Sailnet Articles 0 08-16-2004 08:00 PM
Docking with Grace and Skill Michelle Potter Learning to Sail Articles 0 06-24-2003 08:00 PM
Docking with Grace and Skill Michelle Potter Seamanship Articles 0 06-24-2003 08:00 PM
Docking with Grace and Skill Michelle Potter Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 06-24-2003 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:11 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.