I love to learn the hard way!!! - Page 2 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Learning to Sail
 Not a Member? 


Like Tree7Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #11  
Old 01-28-2013
First String
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: South carolina
Posts: 786
Thanks: 39
Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Rep Power: 6
ltgoshen is on a distinguished road
Re: I love to learn the hard way!!!

I spent This Sunday past working in my mooring field swapping the barnacled up ball with a new one. What I did not know is how much strain was on the ball at flood tide. The wind was 48 degrees cold and at a steady 18 knots. I was by my self on this project. I should have had someone along, if for nothing else, someone to reach me tools. I did get it done. Now I can find the mooring. The ball is now on-top of the water instead of just under it as it was. Here are a few shots of the work before and after.
Photobucket
Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #12  
Old 01-28-2013
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Maine
Posts: 42
Thanks: 1
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 0
doug1957 is on a distinguished road
Re: I love to learn the hard way!!!

Out on a Spring sail with friends who are experienced sailors. We knew(?) there was an unmarked ledge around, but unfortunately were chatting and not paying attention. Then, bump! Another boat buck for repairs.

Evidently, that ledge is infamous for getting boats at mid- to high tide. Lesson - someone always needs to be paying attention commensurate with the situation.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #13  
Old 01-29-2013
blutoyz's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 638
Thanks: 10
Thanked 11 Times in 10 Posts
Rep Power: 2
blutoyz is on a distinguished road
Re: I love to learn the hard way!!!

Last year a friend and I (The friend that got me hooked) were out in a good blow on his Irwin 44 and we went to fire up the diesel when the prop was fouled. A couple of shots to try and free it up and suddenly...BANG and it was free.

Of course the bang was one of his stanchions ripping out of the deck. It turns out that we forgot to stow the main halyard and it was running over the lifelines and was dragging behind the boat. That was what fouled the prop so it was an expensive lesson learned.

Last edited by blutoyz; 01-29-2013 at 09:31 AM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #14  
Old 01-29-2013
First String
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: South carolina
Posts: 786
Thanks: 39
Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Rep Power: 6
ltgoshen is on a distinguished road
Re: I love to learn the hard way!!!

Ouch. I bet that was scary.
\
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #15  
Old 01-29-2013
CalebD's Avatar
Tartan 27' owner
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: NYC
Posts: 4,504
Thanks: 4
Thanked 83 Times in 76 Posts
Rep Power: 7
CalebD will become famous soon enough
Re: I love to learn the hard way!!!

Actually, this is a great idea for a thread. Bare all of your boneheaded mistakes to the world if you dare!
However, I will note that this idea has been used before and there is one whopper of a thread where lots of members contributed their input on this exact subject: http://www.sailnet.com/forums/seaman...e-sailing.html

Like most I've been involved with enough embarrassing boating incidents to have my own thread on the subject - instead I have my boat blog.
Some general things I have learned from all of my unmentionable experiences:

- Never, ever be in a hurry to leave a slip or mooring. You are likely to forget something like that extra dock line hanging off the stern that will get caught in the prop. If on a mooring you discover that the engine will not start once you have cast off the mooring lines and you are now drifting about in a crowded mooring field near other peoples expensive boats.

- Never ever, ever expect someone else to do something that you told them to do, even if you think it was an order. You will find out later that the raw water valve you asked someone to open was forgotten when your engine overheats 20 minutes later. Besides, it is never their fault as it is YOUR boat, right?
The corollary is: never take anything someone else says for granted no matter how convincing they seem. If you have a mechanic work on your engine you should ALWAYS double check their work. A mechanic may have drained the oil out of several engines that day and just thought he refilled the oil reservoir but actually forgot to.

- If you think it is time to reef then it is probably already past time to reef.

- If a little voice in the back of your head tells you something like: "We should head back now." or "We should pull the boat out for the season this weekend." it usually is absolutely correct. I can't tell you how many times the little voice has been right and I have been wrong.

- Always approach a dock at the speed you wish to hit it.
__________________
"The cure for anything is salt water~ sweat, tears, or the sea." ~Isak Denesen

Everybody has one:

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #16  
Old 01-29-2013
chef2sail's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Maryland
Posts: 6,836
Thanks: 28
Thanked 54 Times in 50 Posts
Rep Power: 7
chef2sail will become famous soon enough
Send a message via AIM to chef2sail
Re: I love to learn the hard way!!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by ltgoshen View Post
I spent This Sunday past working in my mooring field swapping the barnacled up ball with a new one. What I did not know is how much strain was on the ball at flood tide. The wind was 48 degrees cold and at a steady 18 knots. I was by my self on this project. I should have had someone along, if for nothing else, someone to reach me tools. I did get it done. Now I can find the mooring. The ball is now on-top of the water instead of just under it as it was. Here are a few shots of the work before and after.
Photobucket
Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket
A lot of the NE and LI Sound Mooring balls have mast bouys with with flags connnected to them to make them so much eaier to pick up, espicially by yourself.

Mast Mooring Buoys
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
___________________________
S/V Haleakala (Hawaiian for" House of the Sun")
C&C 35 MKIII Hull # 76
Parkville, Maryland
(photos by Joe McCary)
Charter member of the Chesapeake Lion posse

Our blog-
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


“Sailing is just the bottom line, like adding up the score in bridge. My real interest is in the tremendous game of life.”- Dennis Conner
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #17  
Old 02-18-2013
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Tyler, TX
Posts: 18
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
bobsaxet is on a distinguished road
Re: I love to learn the hard way!!!

OK. Here's mine...
Moral of the story - when you run aground don't do a bunch of stupid stuff which will make it worse.
Details - I'm the only guy in the race with a working depth gage and I ran aground. I only draw two feet with the board up so I was sure it was no big deal to push my 23 footer off. This is not true! We tried to skull, sail, lean, and motor our way off to no avail. All we did was dig a hole in the bottom of the lake with the hull. We ended up kedging off with the anchor over the stern with the rode to a winch. An amazing amount of force was required - the bow started to lift up out of the water before it began to break free.
What should I have done: immediately take the sails down and try to back off the same way I came.
Now I know...
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #18  
Old 02-19-2013
erps's Avatar
the pointy end is the bow
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: La Conner, Washington
Posts: 6,112
Thanks: 2
Thanked 22 Times in 22 Posts
Rep Power: 10
erps will become famous soon enough erps will become famous soon enough
Re: I love to learn the hard way!!!

Quote:
Second - Don't call ahead to the Marina to ask for deck hands in case you need them for docking.
I felt like a rock star coming in. Camera's and video rolling as i had a truly roaring reception. I listened to this for the rest of the year.
We were in Naniamo a couple years ago parked nose in at the end of a long alley. It was time to go and there was a fresh crosswind blowing through the marina. Nikko doesn't back well at all and I was nervous about getting out. I thought maybe I could use assistance, but I'm not the kind of guy that asks for help. So I was standing there surveying the situation and the skipper parked behind me asks me what my strategy was. I respond in a matter of fact voice "well, first I'm going to bounce off that boat, then that boat and that that nice one at the very end until I can get enough speed to get some steerage". I got all sorts of offers for assistance right after that and the skippers on all my targets were on deck to fend if needed.
__________________
Ray
S.V. Nikko
1983 Fraser 41
La Conner, WA


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Boating for over 25 years, some of them successfully.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #19  
Old 02-19-2013
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Transient
Posts: 158
Thanks: 1
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 2
c. breeze is on a distinguished road
Re: I love to learn the hard way!!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by SakPase View Post
First time out on my Pearson Triton after a quick once over I said it all "looked" good, the bobstay broke and we snapped the bowsprit in 35knots as we left an anchorage 25nm from anything. At least I knew by the time we got back that the engine was reliable.

When I changed my mail sail I didn't put lines in for the reefing points because the weather was perfect and we were only going 20 nm. A nasty and unpredicted gale rolled threw and I had to run lines and set blocks in 45 knots.

ratchet straps. they are the answer here, of course rigging your reefing before departure is the real answer, but in a failure- or your situation, ratchet straps are the "jiffyest" of jury rigged reefing- hard lesson I learned the hard way, hahaha.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #20  
Old 02-21-2013
Minnesail's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 823
Thanks: 105
Thanked 28 Times in 27 Posts
Rep Power: 2
Minnesail is on a distinguished road
Re: I love to learn the hard way!!!

Lesson #1 — Start the outboard on the dinghy before you untie the line.

The wind started to carry me out of the bay while I was fiddling with the choke and fuel cap and the transmission. By the time I gave up on the motor and looked at my surroundings I had drifted quite a ways out and was nearly into the chop.


Lesson #2 — Inspect backup systems before the primary system fails, even on a dinghy.

Having given up on the outboard I decided to row in to shore, only to find that one of the oarlocks was broken.


I ended up doing sort of a crab-walk row back to shore, against the wind. One good stroke from the oar with the lock, then two or three half-assed strokes from the oar without a lock.

Apparently the whole bay was quite amused by my progress, or lack thereof. My wife got on the radio and asked for assistance and was met with replies like "Does he have bribe liquor on him?" and "Don't rescue him too fast, we have money on this."

Of course the problem was that the outboard was flooded, so by the time I was done struggling back to shore it was fine. A friend waded out to meet me, hopped in, and started it with one pull. He gave me a look like "So what's the deal?"
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Opportunities to learn to sail/room and board exch. for long term crewing Bicyclesailor Learning to Sail 2 09-30-2009 12:28 PM
Learn to Sail in a Dinghy Sue & Larry Learning to Sail Articles 0 01-07-2003 07:00 PM
Learn to Sail in a Dinghy Sue & Larry Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 01-07-2003 07:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:01 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.