Single handing skills - Page 2 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Learning to Sail
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #11  
Old 07-04-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 522
Thanks: 0
Thanked 17 Times in 16 Posts
Rep Power: 5
tomandchris is on a distinguished road
I would agree with SD. Capt Jack Klang can be found at Quantumm Sails site, and his tutorials are great.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #12  
Old 07-04-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 522
Thanks: 0
Thanked 17 Times in 16 Posts
Rep Power: 5
tomandchris is on a distinguished road
There is also a lot of information in the Docking Procedures thread just below this one. Also, a search will show many others on docking.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #13  
Old 07-04-2010
jaschrumpf's Avatar
1975 Newport 28
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Monrovia, MD
Posts: 573
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 13
jaschrumpf is on a distinguished road
I regularly single hand my 28' Newport, and this is the setup I have in my slip (finger docks with pilings):

3/4" lines between the pilings, longways -- that is, running from the long dock parallel to my boat out to the far pilings about 30' out. These give me something to grab on to from anywhere in the boat, and provide a bit of prevention to keep the boat from drifting sideways out of the slip when coming in our out.

A very short line (3-4') with a loop on the end, tied to the finger dock piling. This gives me a quick tie-down when I pull in that I can toss over a winch to hold me in place more or less while I get the other lines.

Lots of fenders on the finger dock so that I don't have to worry about bumping the dock.

This is my docking procedure:

I back in, and as I get even with the short line on the dock I put in just enough forward to stop the boat, then drop the loop over my winch. I turnoff the engine (Atomic 4) and jump up to the bow with the boat hook and grab the windward line and give it a quick wrap around the cleat.

This secures me aft to the dock, where the fenders relieve me of worrying about bumping, and forward to the piling so that the wind can't push me into the other piling. If the wind is directly astern or forward I'll also tie off to the other piling while I'm up there.

Now that I'm generally secure, I can take care of the other lines without rushing around, and then get back to the others and make them properly secure.

I don't have midship cleats, which would indeed make things even simpler. I plan on adding them, but for now this procedure works very well and is easy to deal with.
__________________
S/V Free Spirit

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Monrovia, MD
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #14  
Old 07-05-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 583
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 6
NCC320 is on a distinguished road
Capt. Jack Klang's tapes/books

Quote:
Originally Posted by tomandchris View Post
I would agree with SD. Capt Jack Klang can be found at Quantumm Sails site, and his tutorials are great.
I see frequent reference to Capt. Jack Klang's instructions for boat handling, especially for docking. I looked at the brief on line tape (at Quantum site I think) regarding single handed docking with a spring line. While I know he was attempting to show the concept, in the video that I saw, the conditions were so mild(no wind, no current) that you didn't need a spring line (in my opinion) --- just cut the throttle, coast in, and step off the boat.

My question is this, in the tapes/videos that he sells, does he ever show his techniques in high cross winds, currents, or a combination of these while single handing (no one else on the boat or dock to help). Also, where you have tricky turns or downwind docking (you can't always avoid these).

For those of you who have purchased his material, did you find these difficult conditions covered with video tape (not just some words)?
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #15  
Old 07-05-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 522
Thanks: 0
Thanked 17 Times in 16 Posts
Rep Power: 5
tomandchris is on a distinguished road
No, he does not cover every scenario on film. However, the principles work no matter the situation. Spring lines can help in most all docking situations, whether coming or going.

I have been using Jack's principles for the last 6 years and swear by them. My home dock can have anything from benign conditions to 20kts on any quarter of the boat. I do not have current to deal with at home. In travels you get a little bit of everything, and the only line I use is the spring, whether alone or if someone is standing on the dock to help (which is not very often). Before I hand a spring line to a stranger on the dock I make certain that they are using it the way that I want it used...never leave that to chance.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #16  
Old 07-05-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 583
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 6
NCC320 is on a distinguished road
Using the spring line in crosswind situation

Quote:
Originally Posted by tomandchris View Post
I have been using Jack's principles for the last 6 years and swear by them. My home dock can have anything from benign conditions to 20kts on any quarter of the boat. I do not have current to deal with at home. In travels you get a little bit of everything, and the only line I use is the spring, whether alone or if someone is standing on the dock to help (which is not very often). Before I hand a spring line to a stranger on the dock I make certain that they are using it the way that I want it used...never leave that to chance.
Anyone:

I’m trying to learn, not be disagreeable. Please explain me how a single hander can possibly get a spring line (or other line) on in time to avoid being blown down into the adjacent slip/boat or finger pier while maneuvering the boat down the fairway and completing a 90 degrees turn into the assigned slip in a significant crosswind. Use my docking of July 4 night as an example:

Singlehanding. Bow first approach. Boat is a Catalina 320, wing keel, 3 blade fixed prop, wheel steering located extreme aft (stern cleats are at immediate right or left of helmsman). Engine controls are separate throttle and gear shifter. Wind is SW, 13-15 mph, gusts to 20. Fairway is ~2 boat lengths wide, required approach is downwind/crosswind going E. Slip requires 90 degree turn to S. Thus, in both fairway and slip, boat is experiencing a cross wind at 45 degrees. Beam of boat is 11’7”, slip width is 14’. Downwind (E side) of slip is end piling, short finger pier (1/3 of slip length), and neighbor’s great looking blue hulled boat. Pier is standard fixed configuration with two outer pilings, and two pilings/cleats on inboard side of pier. In my case, I have ˝” nylon/polyester buddy lines from outer pilings to pier (parallel to boat when it is in the slip). Spring line (for discussion purposes) is pre-rigged on boat but bitter end loop must be dropped over the outer upwind piling (W side of slip). The approach is made very slowly with engine in reverse with moderate throttle to restrain windblown forward movement the entire distance down fairway. Turn was started early and gradual at beginning to allow for being blown downwind. When bow enters between the outer piling, significant right rudder is initially applied and gradually reduced to as boat aligns with slip, while engine is shifted into forward gear with increased throttle to drive boat up into slip. Helmsman attempts to hold bow upwind as much as possible. Once turned into the slip, the crosswind is trying to blow boat down onto leeward piling/boat/finger pier. But slip is narrow, so port stern drops down onto leeward outer piling due to wind and rudder action to keep bow up on windward side of slip. At the moment of piling contact, engine is shifted to reverse and throttle increased to check forward movement to prevent damage to stanchions, etc. Immediately when forward movement has been stopped, throttle is reduced to idle and engine shifted to neutral. Meanwhile, the bow has been falling rapidly down onto finger pier or neighbor’s boat (in my case, the buddy line saves the day because boat was not far enough into slip to reach the finger pier and buddy line is low enough to catch hull or stanchions/pulpit). In a transient pier, there are unlikely to be any buddy lines. From the moment that I turned from the fairway into slip until stopped with boat resting on leeward piling and leeward buddy line is ~3-4 seconds, and my hands are full…I cannot leave the helm for an instant because the situation is constantly changing. How/when could I have possibly placed a spring line while maneuvering the boat through the turn/stopping? (I consider my docking successful, there was no damage, but only because the buddy line was there (plus last night, there was someone who ran down pier and grabbed the pulpit from the finger pier also). But what if there was no buddy line or person on finger pier?
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #17  
Old 07-05-2010
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
There are times when you're just not going to be able to get into a slip... if the wind is from the wrong angle, too strong or contrary to the current, then you might have to bail on the slip.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #18  
Old 07-06-2010
JonnyQuest's Avatar
2nd childhood in progress
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 34
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
JonnyQuest is on a distinguished road
Good idea--sissy line

Quote:
Originally Posted by RichH View Post
All of the above are good suggestion.

For effortless 'dock/slip' landing .... tie a 'sissy line' between the longest distance between to the pilings that are on the 'usual' windward side. Affix a 'line' somewhere near the middle of the boat and affix a large 'carabiner' to the end. When 'coming in' just snap the carabiner over the sissy line and let it slide along the sissy line ... will hold the boat in place temporarily quite well.
That's a pretty neat idea Rich!
__________________
S/V JonnyQuest
27' O'Day 1975
MS Gulf Coast
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #19  
Old 07-06-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 522
Thanks: 0
Thanked 17 Times in 16 Posts
Rep Power: 5
tomandchris is on a distinguished road
NCC,

I do not think that you are being a pain in your question, I just think that they cannot do a video of every scenario.

First, I think that your buddy line is a good thing...I would hate to see a pretty blue hull scratched. Buddy could be a good name for it if you want to keep your slip neighbor as a friend

OK, an attempt to answer your question with a scenario somewhat similar..I think.

I sail a Catalina 34 (very similar), my slip faces S and I have a fairway the same width that I enter from E to W. I have a port tie which works well with our prop walk (I think that prop walk is a friend) but this works with a starboard tie as well. When the wind is NE and above 15 (quite often) it wants to push me forward and also away from the dock. YOu have to come in somewhat hot...but under control.

First thing I do every season while in my slip is mark one of my longer dock lines (any line can be used) as a spring. I attach it at mid ships, run it back to the cleat or post I want it over on the end of the dock, and run it to the cleat on the stern. I then adjust it so that when the boat stops it is close enough that I can attach both bow lines (which I leave on the dock when not traveling) without having to throw lines or stretch. I adjust the spring so the bow is a foot to 18" from the dock in front when stopped. I then mark that spring line so I can pre-attach it at both ends prior to entering the marina. If I am traveling I also pre rig bow lines only for entering strange marinas.

Where I may do things somewhat differently is in the approach but every boat handles somewhat differently. However, I have put Catalina 30's, Catalina 32's, and 36's in my slip with this type of wind...so not that different on a Catalina hull form.

I enter the fairway slowly and shift into and out of gear to keep boat speed low. I don't use reverse as it affects steering too much. I will obviously use it if I have to stop. I get the boat speed to around 2-2.5 knots for control purposes. I turn 90 degrees into the slip which accomplishes a few things. One, it slows the boat some more as I enter the slip. Two, the momentum does not allow the wind to push the 12,000 pound boat around (Force counteracts force). I then use throttle or lack of to slow the boat dependent on the day. When the boat is partially in the slip (about 1/3rd) I shift to reverse in idle or more if the wind is strong. In my case this can help pull me to port and the dock. If I am in a transient slip it is reverse idle so it slows me and does not pull me away from the dock too quickly.

After I make the turn into the slip I then pick up that spring line and prepare to drop it over the end post of my dock (cleats work equally as well or you can rig something). I am at the wheel (same place as yours) with one hand and the spring in the other. I drop it over the post and then apply enough pressure on the line to begin slowing me more by hand. I then put the boat back in idle forward and pay out the line until the boat stops at my pre marked spot and is still in forward. Adjust the wheel so that the power pulls you to a point where you want the boat to sit while you attach other lines. Keep the boat in idle forward while you attach those lines and then fine adjust.

In my case at home I leave both bow and stern line on the dock so the boat always sits where I want it in the slip. I let the spring pull me to the dock, adjust the wheel so she is straight in the slip, leave her in gear at idle, step off the stopped boat, go forward and attach the bow lines, walk back to the helm and take her out of gear and use the same spring line to pull the boat back in her slip and attach the stern line. If it is really blowing, after attaching the bow line I put her in reverse and let the engine help me pull her back for the stern line attachment.

In your scenario the two things that struck me as being a problem for me would be the reverse throttle in the fairway and turn and a slow turn. Every situation is different and they might be best in your case. I would be concerned about lack of control while in reverse and losing too much speed because of it. A certain amount of speed is a good thing, too much is an accident waiting to happen, too little subjects you to the vagaries of the wind. The other is the slow turn into the slip. In my case I like to use that keel to spin her and take the wind out of the equation as much as possible. Nursing her in makes me slow and I can be blown off in light winds let alone high winds.

Notice that I do not have a line with loops at both ends. That will work, and well, for some people, but I have never found the need.I like the control of a longer line. I can then use the post or cleat to slow the boat and don't have to wait to get to the end of the line and go BOOM! This is also a very controlled situation when done correctly. The boat does not slam to the end of the spring and jam against the dock. However, that has also happened.

Try it and see if it works. If not, do what I did and find someone who does it well and have them help you. In my case I hired an instructor for a day of specific single handling practice. Docking, sail trim, tacking, gybing, etc. as a single handler. Interestingly, he had worked with Jack Klang who at one time worked at the sailing school. Also, I picked the instructor for his strenghts, I did not take the luck of the draw. If you don't want to hire an instructor, walk the dock with a beer and watch people dock similar boats. You will definitely know immediately who you DO, and DO NOT, want to learn from. Congratulate them on their fine boat handling skills and ask if they might be able to help you sometime. A small compliment works wonders!

Good luck.

Tom
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #20  
Old 07-06-2010
glymroff's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Vermont
Posts: 89
Thanks: 2
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 6
glymroff is on a distinguished road
Not sure if this is the right thread but the title snag'd me.

I've been reading alot of threads on how to pick up the mooring bouy single handed, because as you pointed out getting out and back in to your bouy or slip single handed is probably the most stressful part (at least for me) of the single handed conundrum.

Ok... So I went out on Sat. (3rd), and it was gorgeous, steady 15+ w/ 1-3 foot chop. I was just about to go out and met a guy on the dock who was waiting for friends. Nice guy, we chatted a bit ( I was stalling ). I told him I was going out for my 1st solo. He was very supportive. Told me to just take my time with everything and I would have a great day. He was right. From time I let go of the buoy to when I got back was fantastic. I was out for over 4 hours.

While out I practiced heaving to, and reefing (both points). I wore a vest and harness, and was always connected to my jack lines. Good thing cause when I was putting in the 2nd reef point chop hit the boat and I went flying. Landed on my padding, and jumped back up. If I wasn't jacked in I would have been over.

Coming back to the mooring field was stressful. But I used a technique that SailingDog had mentioned in another post about running a line from the cockpit up and back so I could pick up the bouy from the cockpit and pull the line to whip the boat around. All though I fumbled a bit w/ the knot to the pendant before pulling the boat around. The guy who had given me the thumbs up was on his boat just over from mine and gave a hoot and applause (I sailed up to the buoy).

It felt like I passed a big test.

Advice: prepare, be safe, slow down, practice, and go for it!

PS. I did have the motor in idle as a back up, in case i screwed up .

Last edited by glymroff; 07-06-2010 at 09:38 AM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Single handing Irwin32 Seamanship & Navigation 140 06-01-2011 02:26 PM
Owner hauled 32', 9wide mission accomplished or: Single handing Maine to Arkansas sailingbud General Discussion (sailing related) 10 06-03-2010 01:11 PM
I am a single handing GOD! jbarros General Discussion (sailing related) 24 07-01-2008 10:06 AM
single handing yawls scottmillington Boat Review and Purchase Forum 6 11-20-2005 07:47 AM
Making single handing easier stephens84 Seamanship & Navigation 3 08-01-2004 04:50 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:47 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.