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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Learning to Sail
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  #11  
Old 09-10-2010
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I'd point out that the first boat you buy will rarely be the last boat you buy. Don Casey points out that most people buy a boat and learn about what they really want in their "boat" from the first one they buy. The second boat is often the one they keep for years, if not decades, and is their real "boat".
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  #12  
Old 09-10-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deniseO30 View Post
I do agree with the others however, full keel boats are slugs out of their element, the ocean.
Hi Denise, how are you?
Can I use your comment to reply?

I believe(know) that it depends on the boat. My first yacht was a 30' with what was considered a long keel. On W/E races and day races, [ club Vs club stuff] I used to clean up anything and I mean anything up to 30' and most things up to 35'. What I went up against included cruising yachts, bay sailors and the fleet which race in the Sydney to Hobart or Brisbane to Gladstone race.

I did not find any lightweight 'skiff on steroid' design in the races I went into. It might have shown a different result, but not in my experience.

A cutaway, full keel on a narrow, traditional design can be fast as well as predictable and comfortable and safe.

In response to the original question. --> Go for it. You will get more pleasure out of a yacht which is comfortable and functional in more settings. Enjoy
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Last edited by St Anna; 09-10-2010 at 04:56 AM.
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  #13  
Old 09-10-2010
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In all liklihood you boat will be (if its in a slip) around a bunch of boats the same size. i bet your neighbors--or at least some of them--would let you tag along with them a few times to show you the ropes, or be willing to go out with you on yours as long as she's seaworthy.
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Old 09-10-2010
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I don't know how to put this other than rather plainly

what makes you think that the boat you want that has a full keel is the right one for you?

Please, for all that is holy, please, take a spin on some other boats.
A lot of other boats.

Its kind of like saying you're a brand new driver and you want a 1973 pinto, and haven't even ridden in a 1973 ford station wagon. How do you know you want the pinto?
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  #15  
Old 09-10-2010
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No prob st anna. I would only add "in my opinion" to my comment.
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  #16  
Old 09-10-2010
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in agreement with Paul, I loved.. really loved the Pearson 35 on paper and photos... I finally got to see one last month, it's narrow beam. very small. I found it hard to accept it is indeed a 35ft boat! hated it.
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  #17  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cardiacpaul View Post
I don't know how to put this other than rather plainly

what makes you think that the boat you want that has a full keel is the right one for you?

Please, for all that is holy, please, take a spin on some other boats.
A lot of other boats.

Its kind of like saying you're a brand new driver and you want a 1973 pinto, and haven't even ridden in a 1973 ford station wagon. How do you know you want the pinto?
Boy, lots of much appreciated but contradictory advice. Looks like there's no right answer in the end - maybe i'll just stick with my instincts. I remember when learning to surf some years ago the advice was to start with a bigger board. I bought a smaller board simply because I liked the look of it. Perhaps my learning was made harder but I reckon I eneded up a more proficient shortboarder in the end.

As for my choice for a full keel - this is because my ambition is to undertake some long-distance offshore cruising eventually and the general consensus appears to be that this is the more desirable keel for the size of boat. Its a tricky one though and is a subject that will no doubt open up another lively debate...
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No debate

But you just ruled out Hallberg Rassy's, Najad's, Malö's, FinnGulf, X-Yachts, newer designs by Bob Perry, Sirius, Nordship amongst other loved Blue Water boats... Not to mention all the production boats and long distance racers that have done the job too..
Just Sayin'

Edit: The Valiant 42 is a fin keeler, and not exactly a new design

Quote:
Originally Posted by msjston View Post
Boy, lots of much appreciated but contradictory advice. Looks like there's no right answer in the end - maybe i'll just stick with my instincts. I remember when learning to surf some years ago the advice was to start with a bigger board. I bought a smaller board simply because I liked the look of it. Perhaps my learning was made harder but I reckon I eneded up a more proficient shortboarder in the end.

As for my choice for a full keel - this is because my ambition is to undertake some long-distance offshore cruising eventually and the general consensus appears to be that this is the more desirable keel for the size of boat. Its a tricky one though and is a subject that will no doubt open up another lively debate...
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  #19  
Old 09-10-2010
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MSJSTON—

I would highly recommend you not make any hard and fast decisions about what kind of keel you will need in whatever boat you buy until you've had a bit more experience sailing. There are plenty of designs of non-full keeled boats that are perfectly good bluewater sailboats. Restricting yourself to just full-keeled designs is probably a stupid idea, when you don't have the experience to know what you really want.

In the past, a full keeled boat might have been preferable for a bluewater cruiser, but that is really an outdated viewpoint.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #20  
Old 09-10-2010
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cardiacpaul is a jewel in the rough cardiacpaul is a jewel in the rough cardiacpaul is a jewel in the rough
really?


As for my choice for a full keel - this is because my ambition is to undertake some long-distance offshore cruising eventually and the general consensus appears to be that this is the more desirable keel for the size of boat. Its a tricky one though and is a subject that will no doubt open up another lively debate...



that is certainly NOT the general consensus of opinion.

Not only are the above left out (all very capable blue water boats) There also is..
Valiant, Cabo Rico, Amel, Swan, Gulfstar, CSY, PSC, CS, and a whole host of others.

See, not to get personal at all, but at this point in your venture,
you don't know what you don't know.

I'm not saying that you aren't looking a fine boat, but, don't take the full keel thing as gospel, as its the only thing you need to have to travel off to the hinterlands.

There are some fine books available on the subject, as well as many "old" read ~experienced~ sailors here. Most will give you their honest opinion as to what you should be looking for.
Take it with a grain of salt, as they will be somewhat biased based on what they own, but to a person, they will be able to offer insight, separating the wheat from the chaff so to speak.

Based on your statements, you owe it to yourself to spend time on, and with different sailboats.
Walk the docks, offer to be railmeat for a sailor going out for the day, most will be glad to have an extra pair of hands. And they'll talk your ear off on what works, and doesn't work for them.
THEN after digesting all of that,, THEN go look for a boat that fits your needs.
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