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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Learning to Sail
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  #21  
Old 09-10-2010
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Hey Dog,

Don't be rational when I'm using irony and sarcasm

...Nicer way of putting it, though

Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
MSJSTON—

I would highly recommend you not make any hard and fast decisions about what kind of keel you will need in whatever boat you buy until you've had a bit more experience sailing. There are plenty of designs of non-full keeled boats that are perfectly good bluewater sailboats. Restricting yourself to just full-keeled designs is probably a stupid idea, when you don't have the experience to know what you really want.

In the past, a full keeled boat might have been preferable for a bluewater cruiser, but that is really an outdated viewpoint.
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  #22  
Old 09-10-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by msjston View Post
As for my choice for a full keel - this is because my ambition is to undertake some long-distance offshore cruising eventually
What about your short term goal? How long till you plan to sail off into the sunset? If your short term goal is to learn to sail and get out locally a heavy cruiser may not be the best boat.

I too want a 30+ heavy boat to long term cruise on someday. If I had the money to buy a big boat now it would not be my first choice though. Besides the heavy/full keel in a cruising boats there are other design factors making them not as nice for other things besides crossing large bodies of water. Narrow beam, small cockpit, etc. can all add up to a boat not so well suited for weekending with a couple of friends at least compared to a racer-cruiser.

Another factor for a bigger heavier boat, is it will take more people to sail it or more experienced people to sail it short handed. This could pose a big problem in the learning curve. But, if your goals is to take off in 5 years then go for it. Get a big heavy boat and take a few courses, find someone local willing to "crew" even if they are more experienced and can help you learn.

If you just want to learn to sail and explore the area then a racer cruiser might be a better short term learning boat. For $5000 you could get a Catalina 25 sail it for a year, probably be comfortable short handed sooner, then move up to your dream boat. Also larger Catalinas, Ericsons or C&Cs might be a good way to start sailing.

When you are 3-5 years out from casting off for long term voyage then start looking for your dream boat. As that is how long preparing a boat for a long trip often takes.
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  #23  
Old 09-10-2010
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sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Irony and sarcasm can be difficult to identify over the internet...so I thought I'd clarify for those who might not understand your rapier wit...
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Originally Posted by JomsViking View Post
Hey Dog,

Don't be rational when I'm using irony and sarcasm

...Nicer way of putting it, though
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #24  
Old 09-10-2010
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Althugh a little unconventional I too was looking for the first boat to be the one. I have since changed my thinking. Although I am still pretty set on something in the 36' range, I have been sailing boats in the 20' range that are pretty beat up. Perhaps a better approach would be to find a cheap (<$1000), but safe 20 something boat to learn on. Don't sink too much money (if any) into it, just keep it operational, safe and afloat. Then when you are done, and you are ready, donate her and move on up.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jephotog View Post
If you just want to learn to sail and explore the area then a racer cruiser might be a better short term learning boat. For $5000 you could get a Catalina 25 sail it for a year, probably be comfortable short handed sooner, then move up to your dream boat. Also larger Catalinas, Ericsons or C&Cs might be a good way to start sailing.
This an excellent piece of advice.
Many dreams of sailing off into the sunset,
are still tied to the dock because someone bought the
boat they 'thought' they had to have but still 'need'
that one more thing. Meanwhile they have a boat that
is unsuitable for just pushing off and going for a quick sail.
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  #26  
Old 09-10-2010
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I bought my first sailboat 2 years ago. A 32ft C & C 99. I had previously sailed and took lessons an Alerion 38 for one year. After about 8 lessons, we decided to buy our own and spent a year shopping. I tend to buy things I can grow into as opposed to outgrowing. The C & C was a lot to handle for an inexperienced sailor. But I learn everyday. I have books aboard and rely on SailNet for advice. I also ask around the yard when I need advice. One thing to note, most folks at the yard think you know all there is too know, so they don't offer advice unless asked. Make friends w/ the locals and experienced sailors. They'll want to come along with you when invited. Make friends with your local sail loft and rigging guy. They'll become goto people for advice as well. We are in year 2. We've sailed over 25 days this summer. A few scary times, a bit of yelling here and there, and no one has gotten hurt. Its been a great experience. Go for it.
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  #27  
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All I can say is I originally bought a boat as a bachelor thinking that would be the "one". Years later, with a family, I have a completely different kind of boat that makes a whole lot more sense for my current family situation. Buy the boat for the next few years, and worry about the "dream" boat later.
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  #28  
Old 09-11-2010
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You will need a dingy for that 32 footer. Start off with a nice sailing dink and learn while you look.
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  #29  
Old 09-11-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Delaminated View Post
You will need a dingy for that 32 footer. Start off with a nice sailing dink and learn while you look.
What bloody good advice.

I have been sailing all my life - owned my own craft since I was 12 and recently, one of the old salts I listen to told me to buy a sailing dinghy and relearn to sail.. It was meant as sarcasm, but it brought me back to size!!!
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  #30  
Old 09-11-2010
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I believe that you get to a point of diminishing returns, while it is possible to single hand a large boat it is sometimes difficult. So you will need some good friends or a willing spouse. You could hop on a twenty-six footer and be very comfortable alone . The other consideration is the draft, I found that most marinas can handle four foot but not seven. I was a dockmaster in Florida just seemed to me the smaller boats got used more then the bigger ones.
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