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post #11 of 91 Old 09-17-2010 Thread Starter
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If traveling along the coast, and simply wish to stop in for a random marina, with minimal services, and moor up for the night, what do they charge for something like that?

Also I read about mooring boueys randomly, but they charge per use. How do you pay for them?
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post #12 of 91 Old 09-17-2010
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If you're solo, and you're going to sleep on the east coast ( New Jersey? New York? Delaware? )
(your location is listed as pa. )

There is simply too much traffic out there both day and night a mile or so within shipping lanes, I wouldn't even consider it. What's your goal here?
If you're that close to shore, why not just pull into an anchorage?

The depths along the jersey coast are approx..40 ft. a mile off, 50 ft 2 miles off and 60 ft 3 miles off. That's over 300ft of anchor rode in 40 ft. @ 7 to 1.

Not sure what you're asking regarding the navigation questions...we take distance off the latitude scale of the navigation chart. One minute of latitude is equal to 1 nautical mile. A second is approx 100 feet.

Some charts may have a distance scale printed on them as well.

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post #13 of 91 Old 09-17-2010
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Originally Posted by Cruisingdad View Post
I do NOT agree with that at all. I know the rules. I realize that technically you violate the rules when you single and sleep. But the odds of hitting another singlehander are extremely slim. And what about eth sinlge offshoer races like the Globe? They sleep and those are large, corporate sponsored, and internationally sanctioned events.

And when you start picking apart the rules, how many here set up all night, every night, watching their anchors?? Technically, aren't you always supposed to have a F/T anchor watch?

I feel many of these maritime laws are written for the commercial vessel and not for the yachty. I do not agree with them for us. And do I believe that a commercial vessel shoul dbe held to a higher and stricter standard than a recreational vessel? You betcha.

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Okay - I'm chain yanking a bit. But it is kind of the elephant in the room regarding sailing.

It's just ironic that we hold up the COLREGS as the standard, but wink at this violation for singlehanding - which is actually a pretty serious violation in terms of true safety (no not hitting another singlehander, but creating an unattended hazard). Remember how Jessica ran down that tanker while sawing logs?

Singlehanding is just an ingrained part of the sailing culture now, I suppose largely due to the advances in technologies that allow the boat to handle itself. So, whether the growth of singlehanding is due to the lust for adventure/danger, or the fact that no one will sail with most dudes who own a crappy boat - it is creating a problem with the regulations. But aren't rules-rules?

Dude, weren't you all over making people get licenses to sail? Next you'll be wanting to legalize crack!


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Last edited by smackdaddy; 09-17-2010 at 09:15 AM.
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post #14 of 91 Old 09-17-2010
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Umm... you don't get proper sleep. Even on boats with additional crew, unless the boat has a lot of crew, getting proper sleep isn't all that possible.

For instance, if you're sailing offshore with a crew of two—you will probably be doing a watch rotation that doesn't generally allow for eight hours of uninterrupted sleep. If you have more than two crew, often, you'll have multiple people on a given watch, so it really doesn't change the sleep equation much.

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Thanks for asking a question I myself have been wondering. I was curious about the sleep schedule for single handlers during voyages. I guess once I ship off the nights of 7-8 hours will be over and I will need to take naps to keep my sleep up.
SD or cruising, could you break down 24 hours of single handed cruising and allow for proper sleep? I would be curious to know how you both have done it before.

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post #15 of 91 Old 09-17-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nasomi View Post
If traveling along the coast, and simply wish to stop in for a random marina, with minimal services, and moor up for the night, what do they charge for something like that?

Also I read about mooring boueys randomly, but they charge per use. How do you pay for them?
The cost of tying up varies widely depending on the marina and the location. Up where you are, it is probably pretty reasonable. Down here, Key West, etc... you better have a big credit card. I cannot answer the question because it varies way too much. All I can say is that a transient here is $2.25/foot/night. Places in Key West will often pull teh tape measure from teh tip of your anchor to the back of your davits (chikcen crap, if you ask me). I think Key West was running like $4/foot... but again, i cannot remember now for sure.

Mooring balls are generally much cheaper. A mooring ball here is like $18-22night as I recall. You can pay for longer and they start dropping the price via weekly and monthly. THey also provide pumpout, laundry room access, and dinghy dock.

As far as paying for them, I hvae seen it happen a few different ways. I have been where you just fo tell the folks managing the field what your ball number is and they charge you. I have had the 'mooring master' come and find us (a couple days later) and charge us. And in Avalon (California Island), they catch you on teh way in after they frisk you (this is a joke, I am kidding). But they have a well oiled system there and balls are your only option. At least I think they are... been several years since I sailed there.

Anyways, they get their money. Don't you worry.

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post #16 of 91 Old 09-17-2010
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Yes, but most singlehanders that are violating the COLREGS are doing so far offshore, and taking up a relatively small amount of space in a really large ocean, usually far from major traffic lanes. Most singlehanders who are coastal cruising will stop for the night, since anchorages are usually available.

The argument that a singlehander is presenting any real danger, given the average speed of most sailboats, the fact that they're far out to sea in mostly unpopulated waters, and usually in relatively small boats is pure idiocy.


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Okay - I'm chain yanking a bit. But it is kind of the elephant in the room regarding sailing.

It's just ironic that we hold up the COLREGS as the standard, but wink at this violation for singlehanding - which is actually a pretty serious violation in terms of true safety (no not hitting another singlehander, but creating an unattended hazard). Remember how Jessica ran down that tanker while sawing logs?

Singlehanding is just an ingrained part of the sailing culture now, I suppose largely due to the advances in technologies that allow the boat to handle itself. So, whether the growth of singlehanding is due to the lust for adventure/danger, or the fact that no one will sail with most dudes who own a crappy boat - it is creating a problem with the regulations. But aren't rules-rules?

Dude, weren't you all over making people get licenses to sail? Next you'll be wanting to legalize crack!

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a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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post #17 of 91 Old 09-17-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tempest View Post
If you're solo, and you're going to sleep on the east coast ( New Jersey? New York? Delaware? )
(your location is listed as pa. )

There is simply too much traffic out there both day and night a mile or so within shipping lanes, I wouldn't even consider it. What's your goal here?
If you're that close to shore, why not just pull into an anchorage?

The depths along the jersey coast are approx..40 ft. a mile off, 50 ft 2 miles off and 60 ft 3 miles off. That's over 300ft of anchor rode in 40 ft. @ 7 to 1.

Not sure what you're asking regarding the navigation questions...we take distance off the latitude scale of the navigation chart. One minute of latitude is equal to 1 nautical mile. A second is approx 100 feet.

Some charts may have a distance scale printed on them as well.
I will back that up further and tell you that a person would not want to anchor off like that ! Heck, you'd be better off just keep sailing. Ain't no way you are going to be sleeping well rocking and rolling all night especially if wind/current are contrary to seas. So as Tempest mentioned, you will always plan your trips such that you know where you will anchor and in a safe/secure location. Prudence even calls for a few 'dump points' (that is what I call them... places to head into if I cannot make it to the planned anchorage). Get a Waterways Guide and keep it aboard. SUper, super guide and it is invalueable to us.

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post #18 of 91 Old 09-17-2010
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Marinas will probably start around $2.00 per foot..per night for a slip.

Moorings are less..some offer launch service. You should probably get a Cruising guide for the area. Which will have the phone numbers for all the marinas and their amenities/fees etc. It's often wise to obtain a reservation ahead of time especially in peak season.

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post #19 of 91 Old 09-17-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smackdaddy View Post
Okay - I'm chain yanking a bit. But it is kind of the elephant in the room regarding sailing.

It's just ironic that we hold up the COLREGS as the standard, but wink at this violation for singlehanding - which is actually a pretty serious violation in terms of true safety (no not hitting another singlehander, but creating an unattended hazard). Remember how Jessica ran down that tanker while sawing logs?

Singlehanding is just an ingrained part of the sailing culture now, I suppose largely due to the advances in technologies that allow the boat to handle itself. So, whether the growth of singlehanding is due to the lust for adventure/danger, or the fact that no one will sail with most dudes who own a crappy boat - it is creating a problem with the regulations. But aren't rules-rules?

Dude, weren't you all over making people get licenses to sail? Next you'll be wanting to legalize crack!
I haev met many people who firmly believe that singlehanding should not be allowed at all. It is because of that very rule. But rememebr, I mentioned the anchoring rule too - which requires a constant anchor watch. And if you tie your tender to your boat at night and do not put an anchor light atop it, isn't that breaking the rules too? And if you tow your tender via day/night, aren't you suppsed to technically show that you have vessel in tow? The list goes on. The rules, in my opinion, were written with teh commercial vessel in mind and not the yachty.

As far as requiring licensing for boats... still believe that. Down here, anyone born after date X has to have a 'license'. Bet there are many Floridains that did not know that, huh? It is apparently pretty easy to get (I have not... I am grandfathered in). And the point of it is basic navigating, rules of the road, and safety. I think it should bne mandatory... but ahh, I degress. That conversatino will surely draw another long and heated thread.

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post #20 of 91 Old 09-17-2010
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Oh, and let us not forget, when motorsailing, how many of you display a black diamond? How many of you even know what I am talking about? You just broke the law. And when anchored during teh day, how many Americans (it is more accepted in Europe) display a black circle? Oops. You just broke the law again. And if you did display the black circle when anchored, how many around you would even know what the heck it was for????

Incidentally, the black circle is a rule I tend to agree with and I do display. But I have NEVER, in however many decades of boating, ever seen another boat display one. I am the only one.

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