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Old 04-18-2011
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night sailing question

Forgive me for the simple and possibly dumb questions, but i am as new to sailing as it gets.

-So what do you do when you are out in open deep water on route to somewhere and decide to just spend the night and resume sailing in the morning? How do you prevent drifting if water is 200 ft deep (no anchoring I suppose)?

-When sailing into the caribbean islands, what is the procedure for immigration purposes? Do you call in coast guard and "check in"? what is the procedure? IS there a fee for simply entering their waters (Bahamas and BVI/UVI)?

-Finally, when purchasing a boat, is there a sell tax like purchasing a car? What does that run typically (%)? Do most people simply finance large boat purchases or is it pretty common to simply plunk down a wad of cash for it? I am guessing when you are talking >$100K you are likely financing. What are the terms typically found (Years financed, typical interest rates, etc)?
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Old 04-18-2011
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Quote:
-So what do you do when you are out in open deep water on route to somewhere and decide to just spend the night and resume sailing in the morning? How do you prevent drifting if water is 200 ft deep (no anchoring I suppose)?

BOAT US and some of the other organizations have banded together and they are in the process of placing FLOATING DEEP WATER marinas at various locations between New England/Bermuda and the Caribbean.

COOL!. No more sailing round the clock w/ your crew doing 4hours on/ 4 hours off, waking at 0200 or 0400 for your turn on the wheel.



Now, seriously, um. if you're going offshore, you're sailing round the clock unless you decide to heave to and catch a little rest. Most folks would only do that if they had a particular reason for not making progress (like heaving to so they can make an approach to a harbor in daylight)

Quote:
-When sailing into the caribbean islands, what is the procedure for immigration purposes? Do you call in coast guard and "check in"? what is the procedure? IS there a fee for simply entering their waters (Bahamas and BVI/UVI)?
You clear in through customs/immigration just like you would when flying there. Check the website for each country to find out particulars.
If you're sailing THROUGH their waters, you should not have any issues. Only comes into play if you stop or are doing something illegal.

And don't sail through Cuban waters!


Quote:
-Finally, when purchasing a boat, is there a sell tax like purchasing a car? What does that run typically (%)? Do most people simply finance large boat purchases or is it pretty common to simply plunk down a wad of cash for it? I am guessing when you are talking >$100K you are likely financing. What are the terms typically found (Years financed, typical interest rates, etc)?
No one size fits all answer. I would do a search of SAILNET to see if you can find the answer to a particular part of that question. Also read SAILINGDOGS Thread for Newbies...
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Old 04-18-2011
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At night you just keep going. You establish shifts among your crew and keep watch for other boats just like you do during the day. If you decide to take a break and resume sailing in the morning, you would still need someone on watch at all times.

The procedure to check in is to go to the local customs and immigration office. Some places have fees (i.e. Bahamas charges about $300) and some are happy to have you come and spend money on land.

When purchasing a boat the finances are up to how you want to do it. You could take out a loan or you can pay cash/check. To the seller, it doesn't make a difference because they get a check either way. I guess you could try and get creative with the seller, but in general it's a lump sum to the seller. Boat loans are usually 15 years or less at about 5-10% interest. You can find more loan info by searching on Google. In MA, we pay 5% tax. Other states may vary.
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Old 04-18-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dgasmd View Post
.......So what do you do when you are out in open deep water on route to somewhere and decide to just spend the night........When sailing into the caribbean islands, what is the procedure for immigration purposes? ...........-Finally, when purchasing a boat, is there a sell tax like purchasing a car? What does that run typically (%)? .........Do most people simply finance large boat purchases or is it pretty common to simply plunk down a wad of cash for it?......terms......interest rates, etc)?
Typically, always as I'm aware, people continue to cruise toward their destination through the night. Watches are usually shared and progress is made in the same manner as in daylight. Sometimes people adjust their speed or route to assure a daylight landfall in unfamiliar waters.
When arriving at a foreign country there are well publicized "ports of entry" that will facilitate your visit. You would arrive flying a quarentine flag and contact authorities by VHF before disembarking. Any marina in a port of entry would assist your procedure. There's almost always a fee. Of couse, the US Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico are not foreign countries.
Six percert is not an unusual sales tax; however, no sales tax is unusual. I'm a little weak with current financing as I've had my current boat for twenty-six years, but back then financing was most commonly for 7 to 15 years and the rate always varies. We found our best rate with an institution that specialized in just boats, planes & race horses. Do a search! Take care and joy, Aythya crew
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SAILINGDOG'S WELCOME THREAD

Good Info for you.
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Originally Posted by sailordave View Post
SAILINGDOG'S WELCOME THREAD

Good Info for you.
Thanks for the link. Will check it out.
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I have always except once. Sailed alone single handing a 40foot What. I try to do is make hops down the coast from one safe anchorage to another. In the event I dont make progress as planned and get to a port after dark I usualy just keep going to the next one. I just set the auto pilot and watch for ships and other hazards. Never had to do more than 24 hours except getting caught in a storm. I NEVER enter a port in the dark unless I know the port well and it has nothing tricky about it. Example: Ft Pierce has a well marked entrance But Strong current that alone causes standing waves add a swell outside and you have waves and holes that easily will make the horizon disappear and at night can be dangerous unnerving and unseen till you drop into one and have a wave crash over your bow. Look back and there is a wave behind you over your head high. Durring the day not to bad but at night and tired not a good place to be. Another example: Port Canaveral. Big entrance well lit and no current to speak of (Locks control Tide to river and stop out flow) So the only hazard is the Cruise Ships and SUB s that enter running you down. Just call them on the radio and make sure they are aware of your intentions stay out of the channel till you get near the entrance. They have to run the channel (depth) and will pick up a Pilot but you have deep water till you get to the second marker from the breakwater (see Charts). The Pilots will tell you how to stay out of the way. Naval ships just stay away period they are very serious about this. Guns and Choppers. I guess experience is your best teacher.
Bahamas customs laid back. Find a port of entry you like to enter and go there with the Q flag up. Only the captain is supposed to go to customs with passports of all on board, ships papers and $300 US. Then the customs officer will take your money and fill out the papers and ask lots of Questions about How long you want to stay do you have weapons and any animals. If he sees no need to check out your boat that will be it. You need to have a Bahamas curticy flag to put up when you take down the Qflag. All this info is available just have to look and ask. Van Sandt Has a book most read who plan on sailing the Caribbean . "Gentleman's Guide to Windward Sailing". Explains all aspects of cruising the Caribbean and is also useful to learn fundamentals of cruising smart. Just my 50c Bob
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Originally Posted by P424 View Post
I have always except once. Sailed alone single handing a 40foot What. I try to do is make hops down the coast from one safe anchorage to another. In the event I dont make progress as planned and get to a port after dark I usualy just keep going to the next one. I just set the auto pilot and watch for ships and other hazards. Never had to do more than 24 hours except getting caught in a storm. I NEVER enter a port in the dark unless I know the port well and it has nothing tricky about it. Example: Ft Pierce has a well marked entrance But Strong current that alone causes standing waves add a swell outside and you have waves and holes that easily will make the horizon disappear and at night can be dangerous unnerving and unseen till you drop into one and have a wave crash over your bow. Look back and there is a wave behind you over your head high. Durring the day not to bad but at night and tired not a good place to be. Another example: Port Canaveral. Big entrance well lit and no current to speak of (Locks control Tide to river and stop out flow) So the only hazard is the Cruise Ships and SUB s that enter running you down. Just call them on the radio and make sure they are aware of your intentions stay out of the channel till you get near the entrance. They have to run the channel (depth) and will pick up a Pilot but you have deep water till you get to the second marker from the breakwater (see Charts). The Pilots will tell you how to stay out of the way. Naval ships just stay away period they are very serious about this. Guns and Choppers. I guess experience is your best teacher.
Bahamas customs laid back. Find a port of entry you like to enter and go there with the Q flag up. Only the captain is supposed to go to customs with passports of all on board, ships papers and $300 US. Then the customs officer will take your money and fill out the papers and ask lots of Questions about How long you want to stay do you have weapons and any animals. If he sees no need to check out your boat that will be it. You need to have a Bahamas curticy flag to put up when you take down the Qflag. All this info is available just have to look and ask. Van Sandt Has a book most read who plan on sailing the Caribbean . "Gentleman's Guide to Windward Sailing". Explains all aspects of cruising the Caribbean and is also useful to learn fundamentals of cruising smart. Just my 50c
Bob
You must be in my backyard as I am in between those 2 inlets just south of the Sebastian inlet
Send me a message if you need a hand/crew. I can use all the experience I can get.
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The only way to go long distances by sailboat is to sail for 24 hours a day for days if necessary. This is one reason to have crew.
If I am sailing alone for many hours, I use a loud kitchen timer set for every 20 minutes to alert me to jump up and scan the horizon for danger. I never sail for more than 36 hours by myself.
Once you are away from the hassles of land, sailing at night is very pleasant and you relish the nights with no moon.
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Isn't this why we were taught how to heave-to? It will ameliorate your "just-drifting" problem and give you a roughly consistent course with very little speed, and a consistent motion if you're below.

But it will *not* solve your lookout problem, nor the fact that you will have made little progress towards your destination.
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