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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Learning to Sail
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  #1  
Old 07-18-2011
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Staying onboard at the bow

My last boat had roller furling genoa. Now I find myself working to feel safe at the bow for sail changes with hanked-on sails. Question is, what do you do to stay stable, while still having two hands to get the sail hanked-on? I have a bow pulpit and single lifelines that attach to the base of the pow pulpit.
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Old 07-18-2011
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ive done it off the coast a few times, i just stick my booty out with a wide stance, let out a few whoops and hollers (i am a country boy after all) as the bow plows in. i think its pretty fun and even funnier im sure to watch. also work fast and use a lifeline. i single hand, so have a harness/lifejacket that i dawn before leaving the cockpit
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Old 07-18-2011
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sorry didnt make the life line clear, i clip in and use it to lean back on
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Old 07-18-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barquito View Post
My last boat had roller furling genoa. Now I find myself working to feel safe at the bow for sail changes with hanked-on sails. Question is, what do you do to stay stable, while still having two hands to get the sail hanked-on? I have a bow pulpit and single lifelines that attach to the base of the pow pulpit.
On our recent Gulf race, a crewmate and I went to the bow in some relatively bucky seas (5'-6') to change out the headsails when the wind came up. We were short-tethered into jacklines and on our knees and did okay.

However, we weren't dealing with any big water over the bow - which would have been a very different story I'm sure.
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Old 07-18-2011
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Get your weight low (& you'll learn to use your toes almost dug into the deck). Hank on the tack first and quickly work your way to the head (already with halyard attached)

In reverse, try and have someone to grab the loose sail before it flogs itself or you!

I learnt on the bowsprit on this - there is a large genoa on the end of the bowsprit as well. I learnt a need for a sense of survival at an early age. To say one may get wet up on the bow is an inderstatement. It is cool!

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Old 07-18-2011
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Clip with a short harness line to a jackline that will not allow the distance to have you spill over the lifelines. When you reach your work location, you can use two opposing short lines to stabilize. If you're solo, don't put yourself in the position where you can be left suspended over the side of your vessel without the strength to climb back.
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Old 07-18-2011
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place bottom firmly in bow pulpit facing aft feet spread apart jammed against toerails, if foresail was folded with some forethought, the luff will be accessible while most of sail remains in bag.

If solo on bow, then tie sail bag to something before going to pulpit.

Bowman gets wet - it is part of the lore and mystic of Bowmen.
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Old 07-19-2011
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Had to go forward a few years ago to release the furling line jammed into the drum with too much sail up on a very blustery 20kt day.
6 ft seas on a 3 ft bow was a challenge.
Kept low and used both short ends of my safety line to get forward. Then clipped on at the bow while I unraveled the line from the drum.
Luckily had my son on board and felt a bit more relaxed with him in the cockpit.
Wet and scary but had to be done. Now I keep a good eye on the furler when I,m letting out sail.
Safe sailing.
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Old 07-19-2011
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Thanks for the ideas, guys. I will probably use all of these methods at some point.
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Old 07-19-2011
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..........and if you're not alone in the cockpit, casually walk about like all of us on the easy conditions. If solo and underway, teather in the calm! Take care and joy, Aythya crew
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