Single-handed spinnaker - Page 3 - SailNet Community
 19Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #21 of 41 Old 12-20-2011
Senior Member
 
nickmerc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: O'Fallon, MO
Posts: 563
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 8
 
I tried flying my symmetrical solo a few times. The wind was below 5 kts and I was on a downwind coarse. It made a huge difference in boat speed. I do have a tiller pilot and a sock. The advantage of the spin over the genoa or jib is the lighter material will fill and obtain it's desired shape much easier. W/o the sock I am just not able to do it solo yet. Maybe more practice I will be able to, but I am not inclined to try at this time.

Also, it is just fun flying the chute. In my book that is worth the effort.
smurphny likes this.
nickmerc is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #22 of 41 Old 12-20-2011 Thread Starter
Over Hill Sailing Club
 
smurphny's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Adirondacks NY
Posts: 3,649
Thanks: 90
Thanked 108 Times in 105 Posts
Rep Power: 8
 
I think after all these good suggestions that PRACTICE is the key idea. I'm sure there is a way to get that sail up and down alone with enough experiment and practice.

Alberg 35: With a philosophical flourish Cato throws himself upon his sword; I quietly take to the ship.
smurphny is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #23 of 41 Old 12-20-2011
Moderator
 
Jeff_H's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Annapolis, Md
Posts: 7,167
Thanks: 6
Thanked 192 Times in 157 Posts
Rep Power: 10
     
I apologize that this is from an earlier post which I wrote for a different discussion so it does not acknowlege all of the good advice above.

I frequently use my spinnaker single-handed. When I bought my boat I hand planned for and set her up for single-handed racing and so have carried spinnaker on deep reaches and runs in true winds just below 20 knots (at least according to the gauges). I also use the spinnaker when cruising.

My views run a little counter to many of the currently popular views about short-handed spinnaker handling. I strongly believe that a single-hander has a much harder time dealing with a problem if something goes wrong than a fully crewed race boat. Therefore decisions need to be based on what works most reliably.

Because of this, I am not a fan of asymmetrical chutes for single-handing. Although an Asymmetrical chute allows a jibe from the cockpit, an asymmetric is more likely to get a wrap during a jibe or a take down. And once wrapped a single-hander does not have the crew to reliably clear up the mess. So I while I may believe that it may be reasonable to use an asymmetrical chute short-handed, I am opposed to them for single-handing.

Similarly, I am opposed to stuffers. My problem with stuffers for single-handing is the frequency with which I see them jammed in the half in/half out position and my own experience trying to deal with one. It is easy to get an undetected wrap in the chute while it is in the sock. In the best case this simply results in an hourglass. But the worst case is when the sock starts to open where the chute can partially fill making it very difficult to re-deploy the sock. As a single-hander you cannot afford to get stuck on the foredeck for long periods of time and clearing a partially open, jammed sock with a partially full chute requires more hands and more time that a single-hander can safely afford.

As a result I prefer symmetrical chutes for single-handing. That said, symmetrical chutes really need to be set up for flying a chute single-handed. Ideally the halyard, pole lift and downhaul (foreguy), Sheets, and twings should be led back to the cockpit. It is important to have a reliable self-steering method in order to jibe safely. It is important to be able to end for end jibe since it takes one extra person to dip-pole jibe. I also mark my sheets for the correct setting for the jibe.

To raise, I typically raise the sail with the turtle on he leeward rail forward and under the jib, (old school racing style). I preset the guy so that the pole is off the headstay about a foot. On the raise the jib partially blankets the chute so that it does not fill until fully hoisted. I then pole back, and sheet in. While set up time is longer, it is nearly as quick a raise as a racing set.

To jibe, I slightly lower the pole lift so I can reach the pole end and so the sail had a more stable flying shape. I then head the boat onto a deep broad reach with the wind on the tack that I started on and set the autopilot. I adjust the sheets so that they are even (by the marks) and in position to fly at a deep angle. I then twing down the old sheet/new guy and leave the old guy/new sheet twinged as well. This adjustment should allow the sail to fly pole-less. At that point I walk forward on the windward side and jibe the pole. At that point the sail is full but without a pole on the windward side.

I then return to the cockpit and jibe the mainsail as I turn onto the new tack. Once the mainsail is jibed, I release the twing on the old guy/ new sheet and head up to my course, adjusting sheet and guy as I go.

The drop is probably the hardest part. I typically make sure the halyard has a clear figure-8 coil rather than the typical round coil that most folk do. The figure-8 coil takes the hackles out of the line and more or less assures that it will run free. In light air, I release the guy and let it run, but in heavier air, I do an old fashion ‘flag drop’ in which the guy snap shackle is released and the sail flags out behind the mainsail. I typically put one wrap on the winch and sit to one side of the main companionway where I can release the stopper and “butt cleat” the halyard.
Like everyone else has said, it is easiest to drop the chute down the backside of the mainsail and into the companionway hatch. The key here is to walk the sheet over to the hatch, sit down and gather the foot of the chute so it is in a bundle before your release the halyard. Then hand over hand the sail, keeping it bundled as it drops. If at any point it seems to be getting away from you, lock the halyard, gather the sail back into a bundle and drop the rest of the way.

You can do a similar flag drop with an asymmetrical chute by either releasing the tackline or else releasing the snap shackle on the tack line. This is a surprisingly safe drop even in comparatively heavy air.

Other precautions and tips are:
• Practice is important. At first you may want to practice single-handing with crew on board to help if something goes wrong.
• Make sure the sheets are long enough to easily wrap around the boat and into the cockpit again. Since I can’t afford to jettison a sail, sheets and halyard, I personally put stoppers in my sheets and halyard, but I also wear a sharp knife on a lanyard. (Old school).
• It is important that there are no sharp spots on your boom, or on or near your companionway that could catch the sail and rip it or prevent it from dropping.
• I typically furl the jib after the raise and unfurl before the drop so the jib acts as a spinnaker net preventing a wrap.
• Practice is in moderate air is very important. Light air makes it hard to fill the chute and heavy air makes the douse harder.
• Rig good reliable jacklines on both sides of the boat and get a well made, comfortable, pressure-activated, inflatable harness, wear it and hank on religiously. I try to always hank on the windward side. I use old Kevlar halyards for jacklines since they have minimal stretch and so would keep me from reaching the leeward rail. There are negatives to using halyards in that they are round and so can slip under foot. I also have used flat webbing with a stainless steel wire-rope inside, but they don’t slide very easy.
• Check your pole end fittings and keep them lubed and working easily.
• Oh! And did I say that practice and prep is very important, but with both, you will find that tacking single-handed is harder than flying the chute.
Faster, tdw, jackdale and 3 others like this.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Curmudgeon at Large- and rhinestone in the rough, sailing my Farr 11.6 on the Chesapeake Bay
Jeff_H is online now  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #24 of 41 Old 12-20-2011
tdw
Super Fuzzy Moderator
 
tdw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Sydney Australia
Posts: 17,078
Thanks: 20
Thanked 125 Times in 116 Posts
Rep Power: 10
     
is the info in this thread ...

http://www.sailnet.com/forums/gear-m...tml#post808926

helpful to this discussion ?

Is the furler a good tool for the short handed crew ?

Andrew B (Malö 39 Classic)

“Life is a trick, and you get one chance to learn it.”
― Terry Pratchett.
tdw is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #25 of 41 Old 12-20-2011
Senior Member
 
AdamLein's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: SF Bay area
Posts: 1,936
Thanks: 6
Thanked 7 Times in 6 Posts
Rep Power: 9
 
I have read this post before and found it very helpful.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff_H View Post
It is important to be able to end for end jibe since it takes one extra person to dip-pole jibe.
Quote:
I also mark my sheets for the correct setting for the jibe.
Sounds like a good idea... I should do this at some point. Many times I have had to run back to the cockpit from the foredeck because there wasn't enough slack in the guy, for example.

Quote:
To raise, I typically raise the sail with the turtle on he leeward rail forward and under the jib, (old school racing style). I preset the guy so that the pole is off the headstay about a foot.
How is the jib trimmed when you do this? I have not had a problem with this method, but trimming the jib similar and launching from the cockpit I have noticed a lot of friction between the chute and the jib or its sheet, making it impossible to pull the chute out of the bag.

While I have found launching from a turtle on the bow or just forward of the mast much, much easier, I like the concept of launch from the cockpit since in principle it means I can relaunch again later without moving things around (assuming I'm on the same tack).

Quote:
Oh! And did I say that practice and prep is very important, but with both, you will find that tacking single-handed is harder than flying the chute.
Okay, this is hard to believe Surely jibing the chute is at least as difficult as tacking, and when tacking not much can go dangerously wrong.

s/v Laelia - 1978 Pearson 365 ketch
s/v Essorant - 1972 Catalina 27
AdamLein is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #26 of 41 Old 12-20-2011 Thread Starter
Over Hill Sailing Club
 
smurphny's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Adirondacks NY
Posts: 3,649
Thanks: 90
Thanked 108 Times in 105 Posts
Rep Power: 8
 
Thank you for the additional information Jeff. Your point about keeping a sharp knife in reach is well taken. Whether on a commercial fishing boat, whitewater, or sailboat, a knife that you can immediately put your hand on is an essential safety item. Lobstering, we would always wear an ankle sheath. In whitewater we wear quick release, double wavy-edged knives on our vests. (I use the same vest/knife sailing.) I often see sailors wearing those belt-pouched folding do-it-all knives which take WAY too long to get out of the case and unfold. They are nice for other stuff but would likely fold over inadvertently in an emergency and cut your hand. A knife seems to be a small item to fret about but the right kind can save your life.

Alberg 35: With a philosophical flourish Cato throws himself upon his sword; I quietly take to the ship.
smurphny is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #27 of 41 Old 12-20-2011
Senior Member
 
jackdale's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Calgary, AB, Canada
Posts: 9,167
Thanks: 29
Thanked 71 Times in 66 Posts
Rep Power: 8
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff_H
It is important to be able to end for end jibe since it takes one extra person to dip-pole jibe.
If you have to dip pole (poles with specialized mast track fittings). Mark the mast with the location of the track so that the pole will clear the fore triangle.
Faster likes this.

__________________
ISPA Yachtmaster Ocean Instructor Evaluator
Sail Canada Advanced Cruising Instructor
IYT Yachtmaster Coastal Instructor
ASA 201, 203, 204, 205, 206, 214
As I sail, I praise God, and care not. (Luke Foxe)
jackdale is online now  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #28 of 41 Old 12-20-2011
Just another Moderator
 
Faster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: New Westminster, BC
Posts: 18,099
Thanks: 125
Thanked 447 Times in 424 Posts
Rep Power: 10
     
Quote:
Originally Posted by jackdale View Post
If you have to dip pole (poles with specialized mast track fittings). Mark the mast with the location of the track so that the pole will clear the fore triangle.
... and mark the pole lift at the point where the 'drop' is enough to clear the headstay and not hit the lifelines/pulpit.
jackdale likes this.

Ron

1984 Fast/Nicholson 345 "FastForward"

".. there is much you could do at sea with common sense.. and very little you could do without it.."
Capt G E Ericson (from "The Cruel Sea" by Nicholas Monsarrat)
Faster is online now  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #29 of 41 Old 12-20-2011
Senior Member
 
jackdale's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Calgary, AB, Canada
Posts: 9,167
Thanks: 29
Thanked 71 Times in 66 Posts
Rep Power: 8
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Faster View Post
... and mark the pole lift at the point where the 'drop' is enough to clear the headstay and not hit the lifelines/pulpit.
+1

I knew there was something else.

__________________
ISPA Yachtmaster Ocean Instructor Evaluator
Sail Canada Advanced Cruising Instructor
IYT Yachtmaster Coastal Instructor
ASA 201, 203, 204, 205, 206, 214
As I sail, I praise God, and care not. (Luke Foxe)
jackdale is online now  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #30 of 41 Old 12-21-2011
Senior Member
 
AdamLein's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: SF Bay area
Posts: 1,936
Thanks: 6
Thanked 7 Times in 6 Posts
Rep Power: 9
 
Meant to include this on my last post but forgot:


s/v Laelia - 1978 Pearson 365 ketch
s/v Essorant - 1972 Catalina 27
AdamLein is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Flying a spinnaker single-handed Stede Gear & Maintenance 13 11-08-2009 08:32 PM
How to Get into this... single handed? WhatTheFoley Seamanship & Navigation 24 08-14-2009 02:59 PM
Single handed with too much wind sailbot Learning to Sail 73 09-06-2008 11:43 AM
Single handed Jeffamc Cruising & Liveaboard Forum 24 03-13-2007 01:37 PM
Single-Handed Sailing John Kretschmer Seamanship Articles 0 10-19-1999 08:00 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome