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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Learning to Sail
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  #11  
Old 03-02-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingfool View Post
Non-locking handles left in winches often end up over the side.
... and for the most part they don't float. Even if they do they are hard to get back if you're moving (great MOB drill, though!)
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  #12  
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Basic things I see students miss at first:-

start your wraps at the *bottom* of the drum and work upwards, less chance of an override or jam.

Make sure the handle's all the way down into the winch before you start cranking

get someone else to tail, at least at first.

"Clockwise" means the way clocks run. Not the "other clockwise". So the lead will be on the inboard side of the port winch but the outboard side of the stbd winch.

Got a jam with lots of working load on it? Learn how a rolling hitch led to the other winch works, it's a miracle.

A good helmsman can really help the winch grinders by feathering up if the winch or the grinder is overloaded.
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Old 03-02-2012
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Nola- "Got a jam with lots of working load on it? Learn how a rolling hitch led to the other winch works, it's a miracle."
Would you elaborate on this, I assume you use a separate line to the sheet ahead of the winch to take the load, but not sure. Thanks.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrd22 View Post
Nola- "Got a jam with lots of working load on it? Learn how a rolling hitch led to the other winch works, it's a miracle."
Would you elaborate on this, I assume you use a separate line to the sheet ahead of the winch to take the load, but not sure. Thanks.

Yeah, that is what I meant. take a long piece of line, maybe a halyard tail, and lead it from the free winch, across the cockpit to the spinnaker block, then forward of the jammed winch to the working part of the loaded (for example) jibsheet. Tie the rolling hitch, crank in hard, and you've taking the strain off the jam on the winch drum. Now you have the slack you need to loosen the jam, with no danger to your fingers.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nolatom View Post
Yeah, that is what I meant. take a long piece of line, maybe a halyard tail, and lead it from the free winch, across the cockpit to the spinnaker block, then forward of the jammed winch to the working part of the loaded (for example) jibsheet. Tie the rolling hitch, crank in hard, and you've taking the strain off the jam on the winch drum. Now you have the slack you need to loosen the jam, with no danger to your fingers.
A long lazy sheet works well. I find that similar line type (Dacron, high modulus, etc.) work best when used together.

If you do not have a spinnaker block, simply pass the line around the winch.

If you have a spinnaker winch on your coaming, use that.

I have also used a running backstay winch, but those are not all that common.
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[QUOTE=jackdale;838825]Start with 2 wraps around the winch; more than that can lead to overrides.

Use you arms to bring in the slack.

When you can no longer use your arms; fill the winch with wraps - probably around five.


Unlike Jack I prefer to get my wraps in while there is no load on the winch. I think it is dangerous and unnecessary to risk my fingers by adding additional wraps once I have a load on the winch.
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[QUOTE=delite;839290]
Quote:
Originally Posted by jackdale View Post
Unlike Jack I prefer to get my wraps in while there is no load on the winch. I think it is dangerous and unnecessary to risk my fingers by adding additional wraps once I have a load on the winch.
In my experience:

- starting with a full winch leads to overrides.
- with 2 wraps I can hold the line to ad additional wraps.
- wrapping a winch with one hand, with pinkies toward to the winch, is safe.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by delite View Post
....
Unlike Jack I prefer to get my wraps in while there is no load on the winch. I think it is dangerous and unnecessary to risk my fingers by adding additional wraps once I have a load on the winch.
Not sure what you mean...if you are hand -over-handing a sheet with four or five turns on the drum, you'll get an override everytime...
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In each of the standards that I teach, the removal of overrides using the rolling hitch is a part of the course. I will intentionally override a winch to the teach the concept.

I used the running backstay method on our last tack into the Hardwicke Island finish of the 2007 Van Isle 360 after we had an override on a genoa sheet.

I would recommend a few practice tries before you really need to do it. On those long tacks it might give you something to do.
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I always teach the two wraps, pinky down technique as others have advocated. We go one step further. I will not allow them to "grab" the sheet in their fist. Instead they MUST hold the sheet in finger tips. If for some reason the sheet gets away, holding it in fingertips will result in the line getting snatched away from the hand. If the sheet is held in the fist, either the hand/fingers will get pulled into the drum, or a rope burn will result. It is a PITA to learn, and remember, but it does work.
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