Docking with an outboard - Page 3 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Learning to Sail
 Not a Member? 


Like Tree3Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #21  
Old 09-13-2012
SHNOOL's Avatar
Stupor-user.
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: East Stroudsburg, PA
Posts: 917
Thanks: 6
Thanked 25 Times in 22 Posts
Rep Power: 8
SHNOOL is on a distinguished road
Re: Docking with an outboard

My outboard doesn't have a gearshift, if it's running it's spinning... that's good and bad.

Anyway, I think what you are hearing is that how the rudder mounts affects how successful the rudder steering is in reverse. A transom mounted rudder will react differently than a under stern mounted rudder.

I have a narrow turn into my slip (probably not as bad as some), and I dock bow-in ...

The rudder on my boat is extreme in size, so my docking procedure is to motor up until I get to the outskirts of the dock, power down to 1 knot, then the last 100 feet or so I kill the motor, and steer exclusively with the rudder. If I find I have too much speed, I stall the rudder hard over and flop it back until I get a desired speed. I don't have 2 chances as I'd have to fire up my motor again to get me moving again, if I miss it (which thankfully I have not yet), I'll either be aground, or slamming the dock, or being pushed into other boats (depending on wind) by the time I get started again. I therefore keep my motor locked dead center for this (as I usually solo sail, and I am the one catching the boat). Keep in mind the boat is very light it gets blown around easy, but stopping it by hand is easy (makes this easier).

Backing out is another story... since I prefer to drive out of my dockage, I back up towards shallow water, spin the bow to port and drive out straight. This requires a strong coordination of motor spin (because my motor only runs straight, reverse is SPIN the whole motor around)... So with a 180 spin to the motor until I get moving in reverse, I back up halfway out of my slip then slowly turn the motor 90 degrees, this pulls my stern hard to starboard, sometimes I'll also turn the rudder if I'm not getting enough spin. Then I'll throw the motor another 90 (now dead straight forward), and gun it to stop the boat from backing anymore, this process naturally spins the bow around to port, it's a critical 2-5 seconds where the boat has no steering (via rudder OR motor) while I drift in between boats on either side to shoot out of the marina. Because of this, I may rotate the motor one way or another like a stern thruster to get pointed the right way.

I go through all this to tell you, there isn't "just one way." My boats rudder being in front of the motor and reversing causes a very touchy tiller, but it also gives INSTANT correction if I need it. The higher the throttle the worse that touchiness is. This has to be true of most outboards.

By the way my previous boat had a gearshift motor, and a stern mounted tiller. I still had to spin the motor some, and turn the tiller to make this tight turnaround especially when there is little progress (moving slow). Granted, I could choose to back out all the way, turning etc, but I've found the winds are usually light in my slip and significantly heavier by the end of our dock, and it's not unusual to get seriously waked while doing this (skiers).

You should definitely practice away from the marina with how the boat/motor/rudder combo reacts. For most situations a fixed motor pointed forward will work fine.
__________________
Sailing a Capri 25, cheap, fast, trailerable, and paid for... Catalina Mainsheet Capri 25 Tech editor that's large (I mean at large).
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #22  
Old 09-13-2012
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 1,812
Thanks: 3
Thanked 19 Times in 17 Posts
Rep Power: 10
nolatom will become famous soon enough
Re: Docking with an outboard

When you're at zero knots your rudder is useless except for sculling. So an outboard with a shift, that can be turned, can turn you when rudder can't. That's when you need both--for us it's after backing out of the slip and turning both motor and tiller to head out between piers. Exactly like backing out of your driveway. As soon as we gain speed up to one or two knots, motor back midships and rudder does all steering.

Also very useful to have that rotating thrust, in forward or reverse, if you ever touch bottom and have to get off in a particular direction.

Generally, I use the "steenkin' motor!" as little as possible, expecially with students, but when we do use it, we take advantage of its rotational thrust. Plus it makes the fixed-prop inboard boys wish they could do that and actually steer in reverse (just as we wish our little prop didn't jump clear of the water in a chop).
G20 likes this.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #23  
Old 09-14-2012
Classic30's Avatar
Once known as Hartley18
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 4,404
Thanks: 23
Thanked 30 Times in 30 Posts
Rep Power: 8
Classic30 will become famous soon enough Classic30 will become famous soon enough
Re: Docking with an outboard

Quote:
Originally Posted by CarbonSink62 View Post
Long term, I'm going to install remote engine controls and do it the way the pros do it. Short term, I'm going to rig up some sort of extension for the shift lever. I'm thinking of a short piece of PVC on the lever itself and an old tiller extension connected to the top of that. I worry that it won't be 'crisp' enough and I'll be flopping from F to R and back, missing N. I'll try it.
Good luck.. seriously!

One guy just down the dock from us tried this on his Catalina 25 with his outboard permanently mounted on the back - the end result was no end of grief. Not only did the remote throttle/shift lever (from a stinkpot) system get jammed each time he tried to use it for real, doing this 'mod' prevented operation of the normal controls on the motor in an emergency, making getting in and out of his pen - at the only speed he had: full throttle - quite a dockside spectacle indeed.

I'm afraid the only safe way to do remote engine controls is if the manufacturer has designed the engine to have them - and they usually don't for small sailboat (Macgregor excluded) outboards.
__________________
-
"Honestly, I don't know why seamen persist in getting wrecked in some of the outlandish places they do, when they can do it in a nice place like Fiji." -- John Caldwell, "Desperate Voyage"
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #24  
Old 09-14-2012
SHNOOL's Avatar
Stupor-user.
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: East Stroudsburg, PA
Posts: 917
Thanks: 6
Thanked 25 Times in 22 Posts
Rep Power: 8
SHNOOL is on a distinguished road
Re: Docking with an outboard

Yeah, we had remote engine throttle, and gear shift for an old chrysler 9.9 on my Dad's Kell's Coaster, they were a PITA to rig, and didn't give full range of throttle... they did not turn the engine, just forward reverse and throttle.
__________________
Sailing a Capri 25, cheap, fast, trailerable, and paid for... Catalina Mainsheet Capri 25 Tech editor that's large (I mean at large).
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #25  
Old 09-14-2012
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 148
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
ahab211 is on a distinguished road
Re: Docking with an outboard

My 18 HP Merc has the gear shift in the throttle do it makes controlling it easy! I don 't think any of the smaller OB's have this feature and I have a 8 HP Yamaha on my sailboat and the shift control is awkward and doesn't always shift smoothly or complete. I try not to touch it while I am maneuvering into the dock as reaching between the rail and the tiller is not the easiest! Always a work in progress docking can be done safely if everything goes as planned!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #26  
Old 09-15-2012
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Fort Lauderdale
Posts: 29
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
JBIZZ is on a distinguished road
Re: Docking with an outboard

Go as fast as you want to hit the dock. Have just enough speed to compensate for wind & current. I have a wheel & can control both the wheel and the outboard at the same time (controls on outboard). Steering the outboard will give more control to steer over the rudder at very slow speeds. Maybe steer the rudder with you foot and the outboard with your hand. I've got a Tohatsu 9.8 extra long shaft, w/ high thrust prop on my Sabre 28 & find it a lot easier to maneuver than it did with its diesel, sacrilegious I know. The reverse is amazing as well on this particular outboard. I don't know anything about the 6hp though.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #27  
Old 09-16-2012
Classic30's Avatar
Once known as Hartley18
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 4,404
Thanks: 23
Thanked 30 Times in 30 Posts
Rep Power: 8
Classic30 will become famous soon enough Classic30 will become famous soon enough
Re: Docking with an outboard

I suppose someone has to say this:

If you're really finding it that awkward to work out what controls to use when docking.. buy a Macgregor!!!
__________________
-
"Honestly, I don't know why seamen persist in getting wrecked in some of the outlandish places they do, when they can do it in a nice place like Fiji." -- John Caldwell, "Desperate Voyage"
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #28  
Old 09-22-2012
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 1
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Pjc3Pjc4 is on a distinguished road
Same problem

35 year sailor with first outboard. NEVER know what to expect. Any cross wind is he'll.Even have 25 inch shaft but still have very little steerage in reverse-I guess I'm going to try an earlier suggestion and practice away from the dock.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #29  
Old 09-22-2012
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 2
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
rockinxj is on a distinguished road
Re: Docking with an outboard

Wife and I just bought our first boat. 1973 American 16 with a 5 hp outboard. I think its too much motor for that boat but there it was. Twice out so far. Today I pulled the rudder and raised the centerboard to bring the boat in to the dock at the ramp. Seemed a lot easier than the first time trying ballet the motor and rudder together. Basically with those criteria. Its just a little boat.
Just my .02.
Cheers, Jim

Last edited by rockinxj; 09-22-2012 at 11:18 PM. Reason: spelling
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #30  
Old 09-23-2012
Sublime's Avatar
Quirky
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: North Texas
Posts: 509
Thanks: 0
Thanked 7 Times in 6 Posts
Rep Power: 4
Sublime is on a distinguished road
Re: Docking with an outboard

Quote:
Originally Posted by bratzcpa View Post

Coming INTO the dock, I generally leave the outboard at an idle and in forward gear. About 50 yards out, I will pop it into neutral and "coast" in the last little bit. However, I can easily pop it back into forward gear if I need a little more "uumph", or reverse if I need some "brakes". If there is a good crosswind blowing, I'll have to come in a little "hot" and grab a line quickly.

I feel strongly it's better to leave the OB straight all the time. Use the tiller/rudder on the sailboat for maneuvering. If you're trying to do both (tiller and OB), you're going to feel like a one legged guy in a butt kicking contest.

Now . . . that sounds wonderful and easy . . . we've had our share of messy dockings though too!!! grin.

~markb

That's how I do things. Coast in while in neutral and use the rudder.

If I didn't have the engine rudder connection, I'd have the motor locked straight. I attached a pic of the model boat I have so you can see where the outboard is. Yes, you have to practically hang upside down to shift it. The throttle of the motor is on the port side, the gear lever on the starboard. Needless to say, you don't do anything fast.

I keep the handle of the motor up so I can adjust the speed easily. I put the motor in neutral and coast in using the rudder to steer. I've got some lines rigged to catch the boat and prevent it from hitting the dock if I have to come in hot.
Mine handles like complete a** with just the outboard.
Attached Thumbnails
Docking with an outboard-hunter.jpg  
__________________
This post is made from recycled electrons

A ship in harbor is safe, but that's not why ships are built.

My girls:
1974 Alcort Minifish-Minifish
2001 Drascombe Lugger-Penelope
2004 Hunter 260-Miss Muffet
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Docking with two welshwind SailNet FAQ 15 09-21-2011 10:56 AM
Docking jitters rickanlisa Learning to Sail 11 09-16-2009 11:26 AM
When Docking, Easy Does It Bruce Caldwell Seamanship Articles 0 08-16-2004 08:00 PM
When Docking, Easy Does It Bruce Caldwell Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 08-16-2004 08:00 PM
Docking Jeffamc General Discussion (sailing related) 11 09-20-2003 09:05 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:59 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012