First time on the water today, I could use some advice! - Page 3 - SailNet Community
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post #21 of 40 Old 02-25-2013
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Re: First time on the water today, I could use some advice!

Avenger's comments about having an engine and his Wife's comfort level are excellent advice. Yes, you'll use the engine less and less as you acquire sailing skill, but get one anyway, even if for no other reason than marital happiness.

Our previous boat was a fractionally rigged h260, which I tried sailing with jib alone, with results similar to yours. While masthead rigs can sail quite well with headsail only, our
h260 would not sail to windward and was almost impossible to tack.

You asked about determining proper CE. Since your boat is tiller-equipped, I suggest you'll soon develop the "feel" for when your boat is/is not properly balanced, in addition to extreme healing and rounding-up.

I don't recall seeing anything mentioned yet about reefing the main. Presuming you have some method of reefing your main, I suggest you practice that procedure to make absolutely sure you know exactly how to get it done quickly, before you actually need it.

Then, keep in mind the truism that if you only think you might need to reef, DO IT.

Have fun!
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post #22 of 40 Old 02-25-2013 Thread Starter
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Re: First time on the water today, I could use some advice!

Looking closely at old .pdf assembly instructions, I did not run the main sheet line through the "traveler", which is why when i did try to use the mainsail, I was not able to control it.

Thanks for the advice so far everyone!
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post #23 of 40 Old 02-25-2013
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Re: First time on the water today, I could use some advice!

To reiterate what most people are saying:
You need to be shown by a sailor how to sail your boat. (assuming you rigged the boat correctly) Go out with someone who knows how to sail with a main and jib, let them walk you through everything that they do and after about an hour, start to try things yourself.

It's a small, fun sailboat that will work best with both sails up at the same time. You're just starting out and using it on a lake, don't sign up for sailing courses, just get someone who knows how to sail to show you. When I had a boat up for sale on craigslist, somebody messaged me asking "I actually just bought the same kind of boat, so I'm not interested in buying yours, but I need someone to show me how to sail it, would you be able to?" and I replied "Yes of course, I'll be happy to spend half a day back on the water on one of those boats again, especially because my is being sold" But then the person never got back to me - point being, just ask someone to go with you who knows what they're doing. Rig it in the parking lot your in your driveway and get used to where things are, what things do. Then next time you'll know what you're doing and take your wife back out and she'll see the progress and an entirely different experience of sailing of actually going fast, and getting somewhere, and returning back to the dock.

It sounds like you had an awful first experience. Don't repeat it by trying just the main, without the extra power of the jib. Set it ALL up WITH someone experienced, sail it the way it was meant to be sailed from now on.

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post #24 of 40 Old 02-25-2013
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Re: First time on the water today, I could use some advice!

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Originally Posted by Sabreman View Post
'Cause that's the terminology. When crossing the wind while going to windward, it's a tack.
Lets say there is no wind and I have a tanker coming down on me. I know he is not going to change his course or tack but for me I need to change course or tack so I turn on the motor and set a new tack. I don't know if I did a gybe or tack. My problem with tacking is it has more meanings. I prefer to call out "come about".
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post #25 of 40 Old 02-25-2013
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Re: First time on the water today, I could use some advice!

My understanding is that coming about and gybing are both forms of tacking. I could very well be wrong (and it wouldn't be the first time), but that is what I was taught. Hence, the skipper should say "ready about" if he is about to tack through the wind and prepare to gybe if tacking with the wind coming across the stern.

And one more thing, you can have down wind tacking duels as well as upwind tacking duels. So a gybe has to be considered a tack.

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Last edited by CalypsoP35; 02-25-2013 at 06:38 PM. Reason: added last sentence
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post #26 of 40 Old 02-25-2013
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First time on the water today, I could use some advice!

When you turn on the motor, you are no longer sailing. Thus, "come about", "tack", and "jibe" cease to be relevant terms. You would use neither term in that case. In that case, the more proper terminology would be "right (or left) turn to course to xx deg" or "turn xx deg to starboard (or port).

Even though the OOD yelled "Come ABOUT!" in the movie Titanic before hitting the iceberg, that was incorrect because the helmsman would have no idea which direction to turn - right or left.

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Last edited by Sabreman; 02-25-2013 at 07:19 PM.
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post #27 of 40 Old 02-25-2013 Thread Starter
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Re: First time on the water today, I could use some advice!

I'm going to look for a little 2hp motor, and try to network among the sailing community.

Another question, when controlling the gib, should i use the windward or leeward sheet?
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post #28 of 40 Old 02-25-2013
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Re: First time on the water today, I could use some advice!

I am not trying to be pedantic, but the terms should be used properly, and there is a safety reason for this;

From Tacking (sailing) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Quote:
Tacking or coming about is a sailing maneuver by which a sailing vessel (which is sailing approximately into the wind) turns its bow through the wind so that the direction from which the wind blows changes from one side to the other.
In preparation to tack, the helmsman should prepare the rest of the crew by calling "prepare to come about!" or "[make] ready about." To which the crew should respond *after* preforming what ever duty they need to do in order to tack, and ducking out of the way of the boom; "ready about." After the entire crew has indicated "ready [about]", the helmsman should state, as putting the wheel or tiller over, "hard to lee" (usually used with a tiller - the meaning is that they are pushing the tiller hard to leeward), or "coming about [now]" thus indicating that the boom will imminently be changing it's side.

This is different from gybing;
Quote:
A jibe or gybe is a sailing maneuver where a sailing vessel reaching downwind turns its stern through the wind, such that the wind direction changes from one side of the boat to the other. For square-rigged ships, this maneuver is called wearing ship.
In preparation for a gybe, the helmsman should call "prepare to gybe." To which the crew should respond "ready [to gybe]" when they are, in fact, ready. This usually involves trimming the main, and preparing the jib sheets, and ducking. As the helmsman executes the maneuver, s/he should call "gybe ho" (salty), or "gybing" (lubberly). Again, this is a warning that the boom is imminently about to change sides, and it may be a sudden, violent, movement.

In general; gybing causes a much more sudden dramatic change in the boom's position, and therefore is more likely to cause serious injury.


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Last edited by eherlihy; 02-25-2013 at 08:28 PM.
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post #29 of 40 Old 02-25-2013
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Re: First time on the water today, I could use some advice!

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when controlling the gib, should i use the windward or leeward sheet?
Prior to tacking, the leeward jib sheet will be taut. When tacking, after the helmsman puts the tiller over, the boat will begin to turn into the wind. The jib will begin to luff and then flap. At this point the leeward sheet is released and the windward sheet will be taken in. At this point the boat will be on the new tack and the formerly windward sheet will be come the leeward sheet and will be taut. Do not release the jib before putting the helm over or the boat will stall.

For example, in my avatar, we are on a port tack and the starboard (leeward) jib sheet is tensioned. When we tack to port, we will release the starboard sheet and take up on the port sheet, but only after the boat has passed through the eye of the wind. Prior to tacking, I will call "Ready About". When the crew responds (particularly the two jib sheet trimmers), I will call "Tacking" and then put the helm over gently to allow a controlled maneuver and allow the crew time to release the jib sheet and take up on the lazy sheet. Sail trim always adapts to boat course, not the other way around (unless you're a lazy cruising slug and don't want to put down your beer and get up to trim the sails ).

There are some refinements that I left out but this is the basic idea.

Sabre 38 "Victoria"

Last edited by Sabreman; 02-25-2013 at 09:44 PM.
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post #30 of 40 Old 02-25-2013
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Re: First time on the water today, I could use some advice!

I was always taught that gybe-ho (or whatever you want to holler) should only be called once the main has actually gybed as an indicator for whoever is doing mainsheet trim that it should be let out. The mainsheet trimmer may not have a view of the boom and therefore shouting gybe-ho prior to the sail actually gybing may mean that they let the main back out on the original side, crash gybe, parts of boat flying everywhere etc.

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