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  #11  
Old 03-31-2013
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Re: Anchoring with changing tides and wind

At least on my dock in Edmonds, I see more Bruce claw or Delta fast set anchors on boats bows. There are afew CQR etc, along with numourous danforth anchors.......I've had a hard time keeping danforths set holding race mark bouys in tide changes, much less boats around here.

I have an actual bruce for my boat, it came with it. I also have a light fastset for my race anchor. ie light enough to meet race rule specs, but heavy enough to hold me in lighter winds and it has as RC a couple of times. Any of the newer plow., claw style anchors in the 10-20lb range, with 20-30' of appropriate sized chaing should hold you in most places here in puget sound. Yes, take into the account, some days we have 16' tide changes, 8-10 is themore common max on a given day. The 14-16' changes are more like once a month for 2-4 days, to even every qtr or so, it can go from -4 to 12' range.

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Old 03-31-2013
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Re: Anchoring with changing tides and wind

Quote:
Originally Posted by northoceanbeach View Post
.....I need a technique that can withstand anything. ......
There is really no such thing that can withstand anything. There are only techniques and anchors that are superior to others. You've already received good advice on scope, chain, anchor type, etc above. Ask, if any of it doesn't make perfect sense.

Then there is the inevitable standing watch. Someone just has to check at reasonable intervals. Technology has made this a science from an art. Website, like SailFlow are pretty good a wind speed and direction for each hour overnight. Set your alarm and get up around to the time you will swing. There are also apps for iPhones, iPad, Droids, etc that will keep an eye on your gps location, while you sleep and alarm if you get outside the area you set as protected. Essentially, your smartphone stands watch for you. I don't know as I trust it 100%, but admit it makes sleeping much easier.

However, no one sleeps perfectly well on anchor on a windy night. If not for concern over dragging yourself, you worry that someone less diligent will drag into you.
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Old 03-31-2013
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Re: Anchoring with changing tides and wind

Quote:
Originally Posted by Minnewaska View Post
There is really no such thing that can withstand anything. There are only techniques and anchors that are superior to others. You've already received good advice on scope, chain, anchor type, etc above. Ask, if any of it doesn't make perfect sense.

Then there is the inevitable standing watch. Someone just has to check at reasonable intervals. Technology has made this a science from an art. Website, like SailFlow are pretty good a wind speed and direction for each hour overnight. Set your alarm and get up around to the time you will swing. There are also apps for iPhones, iPad, Droids, etc that will keep an eye on your gps location, while you sleep and alarm if you get outside the area you set as protected. Essentially, your smartphone stands watch for you. I don't know as I trust it 100%, but admit it makes sleeping much easier.

However, no one sleeps perfectly well on anchor on a windy night. If not for concern over dragging yourself, you worry that someone less diligent will drag into you.

In the PNW the wind shift in the summer is often due to a switch from onshore to offshore breezes. This will happen just after sunset. Sailflow is not a judge of this.

Just make sure that you set the anchor properly, 1500 rpm in reverse. Check transit and the rode to ensure that you are not moving and the rode is not vibrating.

I do not use anchor alarms. If I am unsure of my set I will sit an anchor watch. I have never dragged anchor in the PNW.
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Re: Anchoring with changing tides and wind

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Originally Posted by jackdale View Post
In the PNW the wind shift in the summer is often due to a switch from onshore to offshore breezes. This will happen just after sunset. Sailflow is not a judge of this.
True, but if you can't predict to check something that happens the same time everyday, nothing else is going to help.

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I do not use anchor alarms. If I am unsure of my set I will sit an anchor watch....
I never use the alarm that is contained in the chartplotter. Way too much juice to let it run all night. These smart apps are very cool and typically run with their screens off, so they burn very little. The latest one I bought over the winter (not tested on the water yet), will also send me a text message if she drags. Therefore, I can be ashore and still get a notice that I have a problem (maybe).

In the end, I've never had an alarm go off over night, even though I've dragged a few feet. I set the alarm about 100 ft off the stern. I have, however, received a false alarm when ashore having lunch. My old alarm would email and I got one. I immediately walked down to the docks and looked out, but all was fine. Errant gps signals can be a problem. On this latest app, you can set the number of fixes outside the perimeter before you get an alarm. Default is 5, which should only take a few seconds.

Personally standing watch 24/7 just isn't practical all the time. I think we would all do it in severe enough conditions. However, most are just nerve wracking and you can't pin yourself down all the time.
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Re: Anchoring with changing tides and wind

For the OP spending a typical night in say port ludlow, which would be a good first night out place to anchor. Even in 60+ knot winds, the groundis firm, waves would not be that big,a foot or two at best.....On the west side of Whidbey island as was mentioned briefly........a whole nuther ball game! PL is where I would imagine many east coasters going if a hurricane was coming in! with pugetsound general being the atlantic!

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Re: Anchoring with changing tides and wind

NorthOceanBeach... Are you making sense of all the information you have received thus far? I have several quite good books that deal with anchoring (but not handy for immediate reference). I will try to dig them out if you need more information. However, in one way or another, you have already been given the most important information. Try and have as much chain as possible! Go out an anchor just for lunch, or during the day so that you can witness your boat's behavior during changing tides before going overnight. It will build your confidence and take a lot of mystery out of the whole thing.

One other thing: if you are working with crew (i.e. someone working the anchor, someone working the engine) agree on some simple hand signals to communicate with each other... It is more fun than trying to shout at each other over the noise of the engine or running back and forth. That applies to both arrival and departure procedures.

Make sure, since you are working with tides, that you calculate your scope (the length of rode - chain+line) using the maximum height of the tide. The advice then to use a 7/1 ratio (including freeboard) should then make you quite comfortable, possibly using only one anchor, since quite likely you may never move the direction of the chain near the anchor at all (depending on the strength of the current, of course).

As to setting a second anchor: if you feel you must do so, and you have no dinghy, I would buoy the first anchor so you can see where it is, set it properly. Then, motor forward to where you would like to set the second anchor and repeat the process. Haul up in reverse order (second anchor first, and the buoyed anchor last). Even with a dinghy it would be less involved to do it this way: carrying an anchor and chain out some distance from the boat is heavy work, and you certainly will not raise it that way, anyway.

Best of luck.
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Re: Anchoring with changing tides and wind

Can you say dragqueen. Good phone app anchor alarm
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  #18  
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Re: Anchoring with changing tides and wind

Thanks. It makes sense.

I will count the feet of chain each anchor has. Tomorrow I will get them out.

Alex, When we have some bad weather Immplanningnon dickk to Seattle to check it out since its a great city an I haven't been there in a while. If you're around ill definitely get tht anchor.

Ill go pratice tomorrow or Tuesday.
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Old 04-02-2013
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Re: Anchoring with changing tides and wind

I like Tempest's suggestion of using two anchors in a Bahamian moor. The angled rodes spread the load, making dragging or moving less likely. We anchored in a fog in Arcachon - where there's a hefty current in and out of the estuary - and this setup kept us turning tightly in place despite changing wind & current. When the fog cleared in the morning, we saw we were only a boatlength from oyster bed fences that would have been quite nasty to run or bump into.
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Old 04-02-2013
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Re: Anchoring with changing tides and wind

Quote:
Originally Posted by paulk View Post
I like Tempest's suggestion of using two anchors in a Bahamian moor.
I do not recall ever seeing a Bahamian moor in the PNW. (I have done them while teaching, but I never leave a second anchor down.) Just anchor like all others, securely.
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