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post #41 of 161 Old 06-30-2013 Thread Starter
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Re: Downside of living aboard

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Originally Posted by Dauntless Brent View Post
I'm the type of person that often takes things apart just to see how they work.
I cannot help but to wonder if this is one of the key ingredients to successful living aboard?
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post #42 of 161 Old 06-30-2013
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Re: Downside of living aboard

Buy as big as you can afford.

Here is our main salon:

Sure people can live in tiny closet like / dark places, but if you can afford to live "better", do it, especially if you are going to transition from a land home to a boat. You don't want to set yourself up for being unhappy.
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post #43 of 161 Old 06-30-2013
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Re: Downside of living aboard

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Lots of good stuff here though I don't really qualify to comment.

Nonetheless it looks like I'm about to.

Doug S makes a good point re boat size and yes bigger probably is better although the number of people you intend to have on board at any time must be a consideration. Our rules is half a dozen for a day sail and/or the same maximum for dinner. Four for the occasional over nighter but only two long term. More than that and we'd need more than 42'. To be honest the costs involved in running a 50'er puts that pretty much out of the question though money aside it would probably be much more boat than we'd ever need.

Brian, one point of course is that for you with family, size and storage capacity will be more of a problem squeezing everything in that it would be for a couple of old misanthropes like me and the Wombet. So we have space aplenty (not strictly true of course) on the Womboat while e.g TheTardis who appears to be a youngster can exist quite comfortably in 30'. I know that I could have existed quite happily on our old 34'er but for the two of us it was something of a squeeze, primarily lack of footsie room in the (very veed) v berth. Cramped head and galley were also an issue though not as much so. Also have to thoroughly agree with you that if non cruising liveaboard is where you are at then get a stinker and be done with it. Even I would go that route simply cos I love being on the water. The chance to go sailing is just a bonus.

To be clear ...

TheTardis - at my age anyone under the age of forty is a youngster, no offence intended.

All - we don't live aboard permanently. Try for three day weekends and a couple of longer stints during the years. Nonetheless the Womboat is pretty much set up for liveaboard and provided we were not still working then we could and would move aboard quite happily.

Oh yes .... fully enclosed or at least enclosable cockpit is for me non negotiable. I can cope with pretty much any on board drawback provided I can always get out into the cockpit. On the Womboat we have set her up so that even in driving rain when at anchor, we can still use the cockpit with the sides open. There is little worse than having a cockpit enclosure that lets in said driving rain in hot weather.

Finally ... if you cannot live aboard your boat at anchor then I'm thinking fail. Not that checking into a marina now and then is a bad thing but for me the idea of marina liveaboard dose not appeal.
OK.... and to live aboard at anchor, we have an Onan diesel generator, solar panels, a water maker, a full size washer & dryer, 2 showers, etc. My wife and I can run her just fine. Not, "too big to handle".

Buy as big as you can afford to, you will not be un-happy.

Buying smaller than you can afford, you might very well be very unhappy.
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post #44 of 161 Old 06-30-2013
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Re: Downside of living aboard

[QUOTE=DougSabbag;1052147]Buy as big as you can afford............/QUOTE]

I can see some merit in this plan, but I always live on far less than I can afford. I've kept the same cheap boat for almost thirty years. Living on far less than you can afford leaves you with a great discretionary income!


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post #45 of 161 Old 06-30-2013
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Re: Downside of living aboard

Downside??
There's a downside??
Awwww, man! Now what am I gonna do?!

Hmmmmm..,..... paint it blue!
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post #46 of 161 Old 06-30-2013
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Re: Downside of living aboard

[quote=CaptainForce;1052229]
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Originally Posted by DougSabbag View Post
Buy as big as you can afford............/QUOTE]

I can see some merit in this plan, but I always live on far less than I can afford. I've kept the same cheap boat for almost thirty years. Living on far less than you can afford leaves you with a great discretionary income!
"As big as you can afford" does not equal every dime you have.... :-)

It is what you can afford to buy and still have enough money for everything else you need in life.

But, there is a lower limit to what a "liveaboard" boat should be. It should be big enough that it is not a "day cruiser". Because a day cruiser is designed for just that: A Day cruise, not living aboard.

Sure, there are plenty of people who have lived on 20 something footers, and there are plenty of people who have lived in their cars too. But, I would not advise doing that either.
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post #47 of 161 Old 07-01-2013
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Re: Downside of living aboard

There's a teacher at the university I go to who lives on a Haida 26'. More power to her.

There are many downsides to living aboard, sometimes I wanted to chuck it all and never see another boat, I sold my first liveaboard as it was too cramped(literally, the berths were too short). It cost me a tremendous amount of money, I started with the biggest risk factors and worked from there.
Now, I'm re-grouping and getting ready to hopefullly do it again once in a couple of years, with a bit roomier boat, and a bit more learning.

Going in blind, and expecting the kind of minimal maintenance that people give their cars leads to problems. I prefer to think of the boat as a small city, or essentially a fiberglass/metal/concrete filled with individual but related systems that all have finite lifetimes, with the timers already running. replacing them sets the timer on a given system to 0, and maybe changes how long it's good for, but that timer starts again as soon as the system is brought online.
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post #48 of 161 Old 07-01-2013
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Re: Downside of living aboard

Big is better but never be owned by your processions. Two heads. One electric. Separate shower. Two full staterooms. Hydronic heat/cool.two frig freezer systems. Enough alternative energy sources to not be gen set dependent. Enough fuel water to live off grid for more than a month. Splendid and osmosis.
For us 46is just right. Everything powered but can run it by hand should the need arise.
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post #49 of 161 Old 07-01-2013
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Re: Downside of living aboard

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A Kerouac fan, eh?

Et tu?

I was given that nick in college because I carried around an old paperback copy of On the Road a bit too long, and I guess I blabbed about it....then I got interested in buddhism. My real first name is Sal so for that reason and others my semi literate dorm mates just added the Paradise and it stuck.

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post #50 of 161 Old 07-01-2013
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Re: Downside of living aboard

i didnt realize there was a downside to living aboard , especially once one begins to actually remain away from cities and busy places....


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