Downside of living aboard - Page 6 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Cruising & Liveaboard Forum > Living Aboard
 Not a Member? 


Like Tree247Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #51  
Old 07-01-2013
BubbleheadMd's Avatar
Chastened
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Edgewater/Annapolis
Posts: 2,897
Thanks: 1
Thanked 56 Times in 52 Posts
Rep Power: 5
BubbleheadMd will become famous soon enough
Send a message via Yahoo to BubbleheadMd
Re: Downside of living aboard

Due to a recent split-up, I moved aboard my Pearson 30. I was prepared to live aboard for a few years, but for reasons I won't bore you with, it ended up being 5 months. I don't know if that makes me less qualified to comment, but I'll do so anyway.

I was perfectly happy and comfortable. I rode out Hurricane Sandy, I had air-conditioning during the end of summer, and enough heat when winter came.
I had no hot water, and fresh water was hand-pumped. I kept a 5X10 storage unit on shore, for my meager possessions that I didn't want to keep on the boat.

The boat was constantly sail-ready, always tidy. The only evidence that I was living aboard, was the mini-fridge and microwave oven tucked away in the quarterberth.

I am keenly aware, that my mode of living would have been too spartan, too demanding for many people. I served on submarines for 11 years, so for me, this was perfectly adequate. My dockmates were great people, they had (and still have) a great social scene. I would have been happy there for an extended period of time.

I have a strong background in electricity, electronics, plumbing and gasoline engines. I have some knowledge of composites (epoxy, fiberglass), so I was mentally well equipped for liveaboard life.

In my opinion, the most common reasons for liveaboard failures, is that they simply don't do the research, and are not prepared mentally or materially.

Tardis told me about the clueless newbs at her dock that nearly sunk their boat. I was properly sympathetic until she told me that they have no interest in learning, or avoiding a repeat of the situation.

Next time, I say let it go to the bottom of the slip. When these turds come home and find all their worldly posessions underwater, maybe they'll hear the "pop".
__________________
S/V Old Shoes
1973 Pearson 30 #255
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #52  
Old 07-01-2013
DougSabbag's Avatar
Captain S/V Triumph
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Boston Yacht Haven
Posts: 802
Thanks: 4
Thanked 7 Times in 6 Posts
Rep Power: 4
DougSabbag is on a distinguished road
Re: Downside of living aboard

Quote:
Originally Posted by outbound View Post
Big is better but never be owned by your processions. Two heads. One electric. Separate shower. Two full staterooms. Hydronic heat/cool.two frig freezer systems. Enough alternative energy sources to not be gen set dependent. Enough fuel water to live off grid for more than a month. Splendid and osmosis.
For us 46is just right. Everything powered but can run it by hand should the need arise.
This sounds like a very liveable set up!

You know something(?), recently at our marina in Boston, there have been quite a few super mega yachts showing up. For instance a 184 ' Perini Navi named Salute. And other likewise huge boats.

Well, I bring this up to try to put things in perspective. Some people seem to have a self imposed "cut off" of 30, 40 or 50 or maybe as specific as 42 feet vessels that they think they can handle.

All those boats are basically in the same general ball park when compared to these super mega with helicopter pad boats. I know I could not handle one of those without a full crew. And I would support anyone saying the same thing.

But, when someone actually thinks they can handle a 35 but not a 55, I just have to laugh.

Which again brings me back to my mantra, buy as big as you can afford. That extra 10 - 20 feet, within our general range of vessel, will be more pleasure than pain, especially if you will be living aboard.

And only tell me you "can't handle her" when you're looking at something with a helicopter pad! :-)
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #53  
Old 07-01-2013
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Beacon, NY
Posts: 2,023
Thanks: 16
Thanked 69 Times in 66 Posts
Rep Power: 8
miatapaul is on a distinguished road
Re: Downside of living aboard

Quote:
Originally Posted by DougSabbag View Post

"As big as you can afford" does not equal every dime you have.... :-)

It is what you can afford to buy and still have enough money for everything else you need in life.

But, there is a lower limit to what a "liveaboard" boat should be. It should be big enough that it is not a "day cruiser". Because a day cruiser is designed for just that: A Day cruise, not living aboard.

Sure, there are plenty of people who have lived on 20 something footers, and there are plenty of people who have lived in their cars too. But, I would not advise doing that either.
Well I am not looking at 20 footers, but at low to mid thirties. I feel that is plenty of room, some have separate stall shower, but I am having trouble finding ones that do in boats that actually sail well. My thought is to be able to sail as often as I can, and I would have no interest in trying to get out on the water for an hour or two in a 50+ foot sailboat, too much work. I am willing to have less space to fill up with unnecessary possessions in the name of sailing more. I want something that when I come home from work I look at the tree tops and if they are swaying a bit, I can throw off the lines and go out for a few hours. No need for planing in advance, and small enough that I am comfortable with my somewhat limited experience. Anything bigger or more complicated will cost too much to maintain in both cash and time. So bigger is not necessarily better, just bigger. I think you are giving the impression that if you can't buy a very large boat, don't try to live on one. Heck Laura and Chuck have been living happily on an Albin Vega 27 for lots of years, and of course Lin and Larry have lived on sub 30 foot boats for decades. I don't think size is as important as actually having the correct attitude and expectations.

So yes I am looking for a day sailor that I can live on. Not a bad thing in my book. I don't need much space, and the kids will only be aboard for a weekend or so a month. (I am realistic that teenagers will have enough to do that they will not really want to spend a lot of time with there dad anymore, they used to come every weekend.) I won't be going too far off shore for several years yet. All I need is a boat to get out on the water, and just big enough for me to live on.

Now as far as not going out often, I have to say I have had many very good days sitting in the cockpit of a boat with a drink in my hand with a friend right at the dock or mooring. So a lot can be said about just wanting to be around the marina culture. Granted if that were the case I would not choose a sailboat.
RainDog, elspru and Steady Hand like this.

Last edited by miatapaul; 10-20-2013 at 10:17 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #54  
Old 07-01-2013
Tim R.'s Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Portland, Maine
Posts: 1,541
Thanks: 1
Thanked 27 Times in 26 Posts
Rep Power: 12
Tim R. is on a distinguished road
Re: Downside of living aboard

The Ericson 35-3 has a separate shower stall and sails very well.
__________________
Tim R.
Out cruising
1997 Caliber 40LRC

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

-----------------------------------------------------
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #55  
Old 07-01-2013
DougSabbag's Avatar
Captain S/V Triumph
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Boston Yacht Haven
Posts: 802
Thanks: 4
Thanked 7 Times in 6 Posts
Rep Power: 4
DougSabbag is on a distinguished road
Re: Downside of living aboard

[quote=miatapaul;1052727]
Quote:
Originally Posted by DougSabbag View Post

Well I am not looking at 20 footers, but at low to mid thirties. I feel that is plenty of room, some have separate stall shower, but I am having trouble finding ones that do in boats that actually sail well. My thought is to be able to sail as often as I can, and I would have no interest in trying to get out on the water for an hour or two in a 50+ foot sailboat, too much work. I am willing to have less space to fill up with unnecessary possessions in the name of sailing more. I want something that when I come home from work I look at the tree tops and if they are swaying a bit, I can throw off the lines and go out for a few hours. No need for planing in advance, and small enough that I am comfortable with my somewhat limited experience. Anything bigger or more complicated will cost too much to maintain in both cash and time. So bigger is not necessarily better, just bigger. I think you are giving the impression that if you can't buy a very large boat, don't try to live on one. Heck Laura and Chuck have been living happily on an Albin Vega 27 for lots of years, and of course Lin and Larry have lived on sub 30 foot boats for decades. I don't think size is as important as actually having the correct attitude and expectations.

So yes I am looking for a day sailor that I can live on. Not a bad thing in my book. I don't need much space, and the kids will only be aboard for a weekend or so a month. (I am realistic that teenagers will have enough to do that they will not really want to spend a lot of time with there dad anymore, they used to come every weekend.) I won't be going too far off shore for several years yet. All I need is a boat to get out on the water, and just big enough for me to live on.

Now as far as not going out often, I have to say I have had many very good days sitting in the cockpit of a boat with a drink in my hand with a friend right at the dock or mooring. So a lot can be said about just wanting to be around the marina culture. Granted if that were the case I would not choose a sailboat.
Well, I hope you are in Florida, or thereabouts. Because one of the many disadvantages of most day cruisers being used to liveaboard, is that they generally do not have interior walls. Which is critical to provide insulation in the cold winter months up here.

Those liveaboards up here, (New England), who are in day cruisers, (and even some who have bigger vessels), wrap their boats in plastic in order to make up for that lack of insulation.

Yet, it has been documented that breathing the air from that plastic, (especially as the sun heats it up), is slowly poisoning your liver, (or is it kidneys - I am not sure), which is irreversible. So, living in a plastic bag, besides the esthetical negatives, also has long term medical implications.

You might find a GulfStar which has interior walls, very reasonably priced.

And, or, there are some repossession / insurance losses boat dealers who you could get some very inexpensive "fixer uppers" at, which are still larger boats. Certified Sales Inc - Liquidation Sales

So, if you are considering living aboard, happen to live North of the Mason Dixon line, and ever want a girlfriend past the weekend, I would still strongly advise looking further to get a vessel with at least interior walls.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #56  
Old 07-01-2013
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Beacon, NY
Posts: 2,023
Thanks: 16
Thanked 69 Times in 66 Posts
Rep Power: 8
miatapaul is on a distinguished road
Re: Downside of living aboard

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim R. View Post
The Ericson 35-3 has a separate shower stall and sails very well.
Yea, I really liked an Ericson 38, but during the delays of a broker the boat sold. I was quite frustrated. The 35 has a similar but slightly smaller.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #57  
Old 07-01-2013
CaptainForce's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: living aboard since 1972
Posts: 1,707
Thanks: 0
Thanked 12 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 9
CaptainForce will become famous soon enough
Re: Downside of living aboard

Quote:
Originally Posted by DougSabbag View Post
............................ Well, I bring this up to try to put things in perspective. Some people seem to have a self imposed "cut off" of 30, 40 or 50 or maybe as specific as 42 feet vessels that they think they can handle. ...............................

Which again brings me back to my mantra, buy as big as you can afford. That extra 10 - 20 feet, within our general range of vessel, will be more pleasure than pain, especially if you will be living aboard.
I still think most of us are comfortable on our smaller boats. Why have you not included in your information about your 56CT that it is a boat listed in the charter business? Your online site describes your vessel as available for group charters. Wouldn't this be a more realistic factor in describing the need for a larger boat? If I were chartering my liveaboard home; then, I would certianly want a larger boat. Since you are in the charter business, I think it's a smart move to have a bigger boat, but many of us that are using our boats as exclusive "homes" would not have such a need.
elspru likes this.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Take Care and Joy, Aythya Crew
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #58  
Old 07-01-2013
sailpower's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Fort Lauderdale
Posts: 251
Thanks: 1
Thanked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Rep Power: 7
sailpower is on a distinguished road
Re: Downside of living aboard

Quote:
Originally Posted by miatapaul View Post
Yea, I really liked an Ericson 38, but during the delays of a broker the boat sold. I was quite frustrated. The 35 has a similar but slightly smaller.
Have you considered the cutter version of the Pearson 365? The cutter (sometimes referred to as the 367) came out 80-83 and has the same great layout, stall shower, chart table, large galley and huge tankage (150g water, 50g fuel). Some even have a quarter berth. The cockpit is great for entertaining particularly without the mizzen mast.

Because they were later in the 365 buid they all had the previously optional teak interior as standard.

They also have a deeper draft hull, cutter rig vs ketch/sloop and a traveler so sail "better" than the other versions.

Lot of value for the money.

PEARSON 36 CUTTER sailboat specifications and details on sailboatdata.com

http://www.pearson365.com/forum/index.php?board=2.0

Last edited by sailpower; 07-01-2013 at 03:50 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #59  
Old 07-01-2013
sailpower's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Fort Lauderdale
Posts: 251
Thanks: 1
Thanked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Rep Power: 7
sailpower is on a distinguished road
Re: Downside of living aboard

Everyone has different wants/needs and tolerances.

I was living in the Boston area when I decided to live aboard and already had a Pearson 30 which my girlfriend at the time said was way too small. I got the message!

Aside from good storage I wanted a separate stall shower, a rectangular bed, good tankage and an aft cockpit for under 100K. It also had to be manageable single handed.

The Pearson 424 did all that and so that’s what I went with. It was a great choice (for me).

I also spent some time in the submarine service (7 years) so had no problem adapting to the environment.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #60  
Old 07-01-2013
shadowraiths's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: On my sailboat
Posts: 252
Thanks: 26
Thanked 12 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 3
shadowraiths is on a distinguished road
Re: Downside of living aboard


From: Ship's Log aboard S/V No Más
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 2 (1 members and 1 guests)
Chance30-30
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Living aboard.... Hawaiigirl Cruising & Liveaboard Forum 9 01-20-2012 02:25 PM
Considering Living Aboard davidzima Cruising & Liveaboard Forum 6 08-26-2010 10:48 AM
Living Aboard NJ djlm6738 Living Aboard 12 03-01-2010 04:06 PM
Living Aboard in NY 2... Culinary411 Living Aboard 18 03-07-2008 10:29 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:40 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.