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Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Cruising & Liveaboard Forum > Living Aboard
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  #1  
Old 10-21-2005
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professorbob7 is on a distinguished road
Education and Employment

Greetings,
I am 20 years old. My best friend and I got hooked on sailing 4 years ago. We have since built a couple small boats of our own, and want to build something larger to live aboard and eventually cruise with our future families. Obviously at this age, we aren''t living off retirement money :-) I was wondering about higher education and employment. I am in college, finishing a bachelor''s in education, but I''m guessing this won''t be very useful in most places. We both have lots of general life skills (have worked construction, worked in auto shops) but neither of us are certified in anything. How does this affect what jobs you can get? Especially in places outside the states? What types of education/certification have others found useful in generating income while cruising? Or, have you found lots of places you don''t need anything other than being willing to work and learn? As a final note, I just learned that it can be illegal for americans to work in many small countries. I definately don''t want to get invovled with that. Thanks for all the input!

Robert J Espe
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Old 11-30-2005
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mwolf7 is on a distinguished road
Education and Employment

Robert,
I am 25, when I was 19 I purchased with a 22'' Tanzer, then graduated to a 28'' Hunter and now own a 40'' Hunter. It seems like you have your eye on traveling abroad, perhaps via sailboat. I suggest looking into getting your captain''s license. This enables you to operate a "for hire" vessel...for which you will get paid. When I was in Greece 2 years ago, I met a 22 year old captain. The vessel he controlled was a 77'' mahogany hulled motor yacht. The boat was amazing. My point is, being a captain could provide you with two things you are interested in; being on the water and money. It would also likely bring you travel to cool places. The Captain I mentioned was more interested in sailing than power boating, but powerboat Captain jobs are more available and pay more.
Another thought: US military bases are scattered all over the globe. From what I understand, the bigger bases have K-12 schools modeled after the US school system within their facilities for the children of the officers, etc. Look into being a teacher there…they hire qualified teachers from the states. My friend was offered and almost accepted a job in the Philippines teaching US history to kids on the base.
Last idea: Get trained to be a diesel mechanic, then travel to any large harbor on the planet wearing a shirt that says "I am a diesel mechanic and am cheap"…you''ll get work every day.
Best of luck.

Matt
sailcatalyst@excite.com
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Old 12-10-2005
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sailortonyb1 is on a distinguished road
Education and Employment

I''m a firm believer in education, so get your bachelor''s first. And yes, it probably wont do you any good in most places. Can you get a job in a foreign country? Theoretically yes, actually , probably not. Getting a capt''s license? I have a 100 ton masters license... pretty close to useless in the real world except for comml jobs. Like you are gonna go to a strange place and just get a job on a private yacht working for a stranger? yea, right. Miracles happen, but dont count on it.Good woodworking skills are nice if you tow a barge behind you for all your tools. If you want an income in some far away place as well as here in the states, you will need some sort of laborers skills and you seem to have them. Try the construction industry, maybe some welding and also as mwolf said...a diesel mechanic. A good mechanic can make a nice comfy income almost anywhere without compromising your price. Fiberglass skills are also nice to have but most cruisers already have those.Or do what i do... consider working offshore in the gulf of mexico. 2 weeks on and one week off for as long or short as you want. Good food, good working conditions, nice facilities on the rigs and platforms. Easy to get jobs such as welding, mechanics, electricians, etc. You and your wife can work together if she wants to work out there also. Nice weight and excercise rooms, great fishing, cable TV, high speed internet, all the comforts of home and no place to spend money.If you want more info, let met know.
Good luck in whatever you decide.
Tony B
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Old 12-14-2005
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professorbob7 is on a distinguished road
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Tony,
yeah, buying plans, I''m no designer. You work on an oil rig I take it? What do you do out there? Sounds interesting.

Robert J Espe
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Old 12-16-2005
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sailortonyb1 is on a distinguished road
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I''m a inspector with construction crews. Mostly welding and sandblasting/painting crews. Not a bad way to make a living.
The oil companies hire a crew, then they hire my company to babysit and make sure the contractor does what he says he will do. I have to work this winter, had a bad financial year with all the hurricanes and also losing my boat to hurricane katrina.

BTW, as a side note, you might want to consider buying a used but in very good condition boat as opposed to building one. Building your own boat is not as much of a saving as most would suspect. You will save 1/3 to 1/2 on the hull....thats it.Depending on the size of the boat, that might only be a small portion of the overall cost. If you plan on building a new hull and fitting it with used parts, then you are defeating the purpose of a building a new boat.
Good luck and have fun
Tony B
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Old 12-25-2005
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pigslo is on a distinguished road
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Before I would ever build a boat hull I would find a derelict fiberglass hulled boat in the size and shape of my choice and build from that. The savings this way would be substantial. Even if you found the boat of your choice in really bad condition but not quite a derelict you would come out better as boat values fall like a rock based on condition.
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Old 01-04-2006
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professorbob7 is on a distinguished road
Education and Employment

A used boat might be cheaper, but I love wood (smells good, doesn''t sink), and old wood boats are either cheap or in good condition, never both :-) The good news is I read George Buehler''s Backyard Yacht Building. Building in workboat style means I can keep the cost of the hull to a minimum (resale isn''t high, but neither is the initial cost, and I''m building it for me, not to sell). Plus, my brother is a blacksmith, so he can fabricate most of the metal parts I need for me. And, I can sew my own sails, although I may not, depends on what I''m feeling like when the time comes. I''ve already built 2 small boats, so I''m not too worried about that aspect. But it is good advice, if I didn''t want to build it, I probably wouldn''t.

Robert J Espe
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