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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest Forums > Cruising & Liveaboard Forum > Living Aboard
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  #21  
Old 09-17-2006
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Greetings Woolswtr,

I was just there today (Sunday Sept 17) doing final inspection and signing up. The boat has been chosen, the financing secured, the captain solicited, references checked and hired. All that remains is a sea trial, closing and 1800mile sail from Tampa and I'll be there. I will look you up for sure. I will be in the Gulfstar 47 Sailmaster "Bacchus"

gconley
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  #22  
Old 08-30-2007
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Talking Winter in Maine, straight ahead...!

Hi, everyone!
I am contemplating, heck, am faced with at this point, wintering in Portland, Maine. My friend is selling me his older boat (Nordica 30) as my bachelor's pad.
I am not averse to the cold, having grown up on the shores of the Baltic sea, but would like to make it as livable as possible.
My first question, out of many yet to come, is the "wrap" dilemma. As I understand, it is a choice between condensation and keeping those chilly winds from freezing my tongue, when I try to supplement my meager drinking supply by licking the condensation off the headliner. Just kidding...
Pros and cons, please. I have to get this right the first time.
Some details... I have sailed all my life, on and off, around NYC area and NE.
This will be my second boat, but my wintering experience on the water is non existent. I am in it for the long haul, having wanted to live on the boat, more or less, secretly, for most of my life.... My ex gave me the chance...
WhooOppeee....

The seeker
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  #23  
Old 08-30-2007
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Insulate the boat wherever you can and buy the biggest, baddest heater you can afford.
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I had a dream, I was sailing, I was happy, I was even smiling. Then I looked down and saw that I was on a multi-hull and woke up suddenly in a cold sweat.
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  #24  
Old 08-30-2007
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Just be aware that if you get a stove or heater—the dry fuel ones like wood burning stoves will introduce far less moisture into the boat... ventilation is going to be a necessity, since you will have serious condensation problems otherwise.

Quote:
Originally Posted by zaliasvejas View Post
Hi, everyone!
I am contemplating, heck, am faced with at this point, wintering in Portland, Maine. My friend is selling me his older boat (Nordica 30) as my bachelor's pad.
I am not averse to the cold, having grown up on the shores of the Baltic sea, but would like to make it as livable as possible.
My first question, out of many yet to come, is the "wrap" dilemma. As I understand, it is a choice between condensation and keeping those chilly winds from freezing my tongue, when I try to supplement my meager drinking supply by licking the condensation off the headliner. Just kidding...
Pros and cons, please. I have to get this right the first time.
Some details... I have sailed all my life, on and off, around NYC area and NE.
This will be my second boat, but my wintering experience on the water is non existent. I am in it for the long haul, having wanted to live on the boat, more or less, secretly, for most of my life.... My ex gave me the chance...
WhooOppeee....

The seeker
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her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

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  #25  
Old 08-30-2007
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Wood burning could be a awy to go up in Maine with cheap local wood, but a diesel heater like an espar/esbacher (as mentioned above) which takes in outside air and heats it up, shouldn't create an moisture problem for you. They are routinely used as commercial bus heaters, follow the instructions for installation and use and they work very well.
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  #26  
Old 08-31-2007
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Cover the boat with trasparent shrinkwrap. Keeps the snow off & creates a greenhouse.
Cover the decks with insulation and cover the insulation with black plastic. Keeps the heat in.
Figure out what you'll do about pump out/waste discharge.
If you get condensation inside...buy a dehumidifier, put a layer of plastic window film over the hatches, open all lockers, run a fan for air circulation, vent your shower to the outside and close off the shower to the inside, avoid boiling water for coffee, tea or pasta...
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  #27  
Old 08-31-2007
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Thanks, everyone!
The greenhouse effect sounds promising, but in order for it to work, everything has to be sealed tight, am I correct? Sounds a bit claustrophobic...
I foresee a long snorkel sticking out of the plastic for the heater went. How noisy will all that be in the rain?
I was considering a vented diesel heater, since we will not be competing for the same scarce source of oxygen at night.... I would not win that battle...
How about some serious insulation on the inside? There is a headliner in the boat now, but it is not glued to the underside of the cabin top. Moisture most likely will collect somewhere right above your neck, get really putrid and drip in to you bed...
So, this is what I got so far... Outside vented heater, minimal water vapor inside the boat, a chamber pot for the late night relief and massive insulation job on the inside to minimize really cold areas for the water to condensate on.
And, yes, a fan to even it all out.
Thanks, everyone, this is a very informative place...
Sort of therapeutic, in a way...most of the time.

The Seeker
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  #28  
Old 08-31-2007
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SanderO is an unknown quantity at this point
I've lived aboard in NE at dockside with an espar and a small 110v ceramic heater.

A clear shrink wrap cover adds a lot of heat... and it doesn't have to be completely sealed. In fact you WANT vent holes.

People at my winter layup who live aboard use some sort of propane heaters and get a large tank which sits on the dock (safer no?). All have plastic covers.

Core hulls are reasonably well insulated, but you want to cycle in fresh air and dehumidify it as well. Water in the winter is often warmer than the air except on the coldest days.

The trouble is the ice on the boat (if uncovered) and the docks. This is really dangerous.

jef
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  #29  
Old 08-31-2007
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We taped silver-sided bubble wrap insulation (from Home Depot) to the cabin top and inside of lockers. Virtually eliminated the drippy condensation issues. Instead of shrink wrap, we used translucent 6-mil drop cloth weighted down with partially-filled antifreeze jugs scrounged from the marina - as someone else here said, you WANT some kind of venting.

An oil-filled electric heater - looks like an old-fashioned radiator - made the boat cozy with zero carbon monoxide worries. But that depends on how your marina charges you for power usage. If you use an espar, etc - make sure to install a CO detector.

Get 2 pairs of 'Yak-Trax' or similar snow cleats from REI, EMS, or other outdoors store. Keep one pair in your car (if it snows while you're away from your boat) and another in your cockpit (if it snows while you're home).

Make a deal with your neighbors re: water-tank-refilling parties. Many marinas turn off water taps at the docks during the winter, so you have to roam farther to get water. You and your neighbors will have to chain all your hoses together to reach the taps on land, pick a relatively warm day and fill everyone's tank at once.

There's a wonderful sense of cameraderie that you and the other hardy souls will share - enjoy it.
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  #30  
Old 08-31-2007
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Thanks for good advise...
I will go visit the two marinas I have in mind and see if I can talk about the particulars...
Has anyone used simple foam insulation on the inside, glued temporarily to the inside of the hull? Seems one could throw it all away in the spring...
How about the part of the hull below waterline? Is there any heat to be scrounged from the deep? Theoretically, water is about at least 32F...
Does that actually keep the interior above freezing if the boat is unattended?
Thanks again for the insights


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