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Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Cruising & Liveaboard Forum > Living Aboard
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  #51  
Old 10-19-2007
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Reverse cycle AC uses ducting and fans to switch the role of the evaporator and the condensor, so the heat normally extracted from your boat and "dumped" outside, is instead extracted from the outside air and "dumped" into your boat.

This produces some heat down to around 40-45F as I recall. The systems usually are adjuncted by a conventional set of AC heating coils, i.e. an electric heater to provide heat when the reverse cycle can't do it.
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  #52  
Old 10-19-2007
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HS...I think emergency heating coils are relegated to land based systems or REALLY bit yachts since it is a high current AC draw. My reverse cycle was useful down to water temps of about 40-45 degrees and could raise us up about 20 degrees from that. Not much use in northern winter climates but quite helpful in the south! I wouldn't rely on a reverse cycle system anywhere from the Chesapeake north.
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  #53  
Old 10-31-2007
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Boat Selection

I have also recently been given the opportunity to live aboard by my "x". I've been sailing for over 20 years, and have owned two boats. I started with a 19' and spent the last five years with a 30'. I really appreciate all the advise... it's been valuable... but there's been very little discussion about boat size and features. I've just begun looking but have seen boats ranging from 35' to 50'. I think the larger ones would be more comfortable, but what about when I want to sail? I'd be living mostly alone (with regular overnight visits from friends and family--maximum of two at a time). BUT, I end up sailing alone often. Questions: How important is a furling main or the conveniences of a "Freedom"? How important is boat age? When is a boat too large to single hand--I had no trouble with my 30? Is it a huge advantage if I find a newer boat with a diesel furnace already onboard? How about an aluminum hull? Is Constitution as expensive as Marina Bay in Quincy (they quoted me nearly $5K for rent alone from Nov1-March)?
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Old 11-12-2007
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Hi, guys!

A quick update on insulating...
I have glued up the whole vberth of the boat with foil covered bubble wrap. Makes quite a difference... besides giving the place a disco/madhouse/padded room kinda feel. Curiously, there is still slight condensation on the surface, since it stays cooler, so my next step is to glue polyethylene foam (packing material) on top of that. When I tried a section, foam stayed very warm and comfy. It is low 20's at night, but since I stay in my sleeping bag, I only need minimal heat from the electrical heater. It's a bit cool when I get out of the bag, but wakes me up instantly...
It has been a month now since I moved onto my boat and it is amazing how important the home part of the boat becomes, at this point. I keep it simple, alcohol stove, hand pump, but the sink and the galley in general needs serious redesign.
I love it, neighbours are friendly and the boat is getting cosier by the day...
Slowly. Also, it seems to take a lot longer to get to work in the morning...
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Old 11-13-2007
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Thanks for keeping us posted (pun intended!).
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"... the only matter of consequence before me is what I will do with my alloted time. I can remain on shore, paralyzed with fear, or I can raise my sails and dip and soar in the breeze." - Richard Bode, First you have to row a little boat (pg. 94)
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  #56  
Old 11-19-2007
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Winterise or not to winterise...

With some surprise and apprehension, I noticed ice in the water in the corner of the marina... Water is supposed to be around 40F still.
Here is my dilemma: should I keep the engine exercised weekly and engine room warm, including sea-cocks in the area through the winter or should I winterise? People do it either way in the marina. I figure, since I will have to keep bilges warm anyway, to hold on to the sea-cocks, it seems automatic to keep the engine ready to go, too.
Any thoughts?
Also, should water tank be insulated?
Is there a good way to monitor engine room temperature? All I can think of is remote sensor for inside/outside digital thermometer from Home Depot.
I have started insulating the engine room, anyway.
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Old 11-20-2007
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"All I can think of is remote sensor for inside/outside digital thermometer from Home Depot." Or one of those $10 digital oven timers, with a temperature alarm and a three foot long probe wire, so it can be in the engine room while the display/alarm are in the cabin. Typically run for a couple of years on one AAA cell.

People forget that harbors and marinas routinely froze over solid in the Northeast, the recent crop of warm winters (last 10-15 years?) has been the exception. Folks used to haul the boats all the time--because freezing was expecting.

Now...well, there are some benefits to global warming, besides preventing the ice age we are supposed to be in the middle of.
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  #58  
Old 11-21-2007
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Are you serious? Ice already? Crap! We live in Toronto, on board all year and in the winter, I use 2 ice eaters to keep the ice away from the boat. Inside we use those oil filled heaters and when it really gets cold, like minus 20 or some stupid temp we use our Newport diesel heater. I have never had engine freeze up problems as if the boat is heated, how could there be? The wife demands at least 78 inside and I have to admit she is right, despite the cost. Gotta be warm!
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Old 11-22-2007
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Toronto Winters

Hi, all. I am recently divorced and am looking for a proper boat to live aboard for a couple years. I live in New England and am most concerned with winters. Also, I have been sailing for about 20 years and I want to make sure I can still sail... single-handed at times. How essential is a pilot house? Any particular length or make? It will just be me... with young children (brought up sailing) every other weekend. Does anyone have any particular advice? Any response would be appreciated.
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  #60  
Old 11-22-2007
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Robpellaw-

A pilothouse isn't essential, just really nice to have... You really should start your own thread... instead of hijacking this one... you'll get much better advice. Hijacking a thread is considered poor net etiquette.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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