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-   -   I finally did it now lets see what equipments I should consider (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/living-aboard/34774-i-finally-did-now-lets-see-what-equipments-i-should-consider.html)

Borvaprops 07-11-2007 10:46 PM

I finally did it now lets see what equipments I should consider
 
Hi everyone. I would like to tell you all that I finally did it. This past saturday I purchased an aloha 28 a Ted Brewer design. I chose this boat after lots of research and I feel that this boat will be ideal for what I am looking for. I'm waiting now for the survey which is happening on Monday and if everything is ok I shall have a boat. I am going to live aboard in Toronto. The boat does not have hot water, no heater, very limited electronics, no fridge (ice box only). I would like to know from the more experienced sailor/liveaboard what should I consider. Since the boat came at a very well low price well under my budget I still have money left over for the upgrade. This is what I was considering: Heater, Cozy Cabin Propane by force 10, electric or propane water heater? propane stove or keep the alcohol? what about fridge? I want to install a propane system since propane is cheaper than electricity, considering a locker and all lines from WM. Anyhow as you can see I'm a little overwhelmed and not sure where even to begin. Any info would be greatly appreciated. I'm willing to spend another 2-3K in upgrades.

sailingdog 07-11-2007 11:00 PM

Congratulations.

As for equipment.

The heater is probably more important than the water heater. The propane stove is a good choice, especially if you plan to cruise for any distance. If you go with propane heat and stove, then a propane water heater would make sense as well. It would make sense to install a dual power source water heater—electric and engine heat exchanger, so that it can be used both at the dock and when cruising. You may want to use 110 VAC heaters as well. However, insulating the boat is probably a key step... if the boat has a cored deck and topsides, it would probably be a good start... but solid fiberglass is a poor insulator.

I wouldn't buy the lines, locker or stove from WM as there are other places on-line to buy them for much less than WM would charge. I would also highly recommend you get the newer composite tanks, rather than steel or aluminum propane tanks. The new tanks have translucent side panels that actually let you see how much propane is left in the tank. They're available in 10, 20 and 30 lb. sizes, however the 30 lb. size aren't designed for simple low pressure devices like stoves and heaters.

I'd recommend a good DSC-capable VHF and a small GPS chartplotter.

If you want refrigeration, I'd have to recommend that you get an Engel or Norcold dual voltage refrigerator. These units were highly rated by PS and will run on both 12 VDC or 110 VAC when you're at a dock with shore power. If you're going to be living aboard, a 120 VAC shorepower system is pretty much a requirement.

camaraderie 07-11-2007 11:02 PM

Borva...congrats and good luck.
If you are proposing to live aboard in toronto in the winter...the first thing you should concentrate on is insulating your hull as the moisture in winter will be miserable otherwise. I think it makes sense for you to put together a propane system for your boat with the cozy cabinheater as the first piece but the system designed for plumbing in an LP stove in the future. You can certainly live with alchohol for the short term and I would suggest you add an electric water heater and AC electric to the boat if you will be living dockside. You can then run an electric cabin heater as well as water heater as needed rather than leaving propane turned on when you are not on the boat. Anyway...those are a few thoughts. May I also suggest you join the live aboard mailing list as there used to be some toronto folks on there that might be able to help you make the right choices. The list is hosted out of the U of Toronto!
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sailingdog 07-11-2007 11:14 PM

One other point... solid fuel heaters are generally much drier heat sources than propane heaters are. It might be worth considering a dry fuel heater, rather than a propane one.

Sailormann 07-11-2007 11:19 PM

Quote:

I would also highly recommend you get the newer composite tanks, rather than steel or aluminum propane tanks. The new tanks have translucent side panels that actually let you see how much propane is left in the tank. They're available in 10, 20 and 30 lb. sizes, however the 30 lb. size aren't designed for simple low pressure devices like stoves and heaters.
These tanks are not available in Canada. They have not been certified by the Government yet.

knotaloud 07-11-2007 11:36 PM

I added an instant hot water dispenser to my little boat a few months ago, I love it. It only works on shore power and draws about 6 amps, but the unit is real small (shoe box size) and instantly pumps out up to 60 cups an hour of boiling water. It's extremely handy; you can make coffee, soup, and top ramen! I got mine on ebay for $150 and it came with a nice chrome faucet and the under sink mount. The plumbing was a little sketchy, but I made it work.


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