I think I've been snookered - Page 3 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Cruising & Liveaboard Forum > Living Aboard
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #21  
Old 10-06-2007
Junior Birdman
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Floriduh
Posts: 135
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
Iflyka200s is on a distinguished road
Hi,

FNG here but all I can add is..

As a former insurance adjuster a couple of things..

In the insurance gig EVERYTHING (and I mean that) is negotiable and the squeaky wheel gets the grease which is to say if you yell loud enough (be nice) you will be heard. I would spend the extra $$$ to have a public adjuster look at your problem, a marine expert even better. Insurance is to make you whole again, what is insured is stupidity and just plain ole dumb luck. As far as where to live while your boat is on the hard, check your policy for anything that looks like "Loss of use" and you could be camping at the 'Casa de Best Western'. Hope this helps and I LOVE this place!

All the above supposes that you are in the Good 'ole USA btw...

Tim
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #22  
Old 10-06-2007
HoffaLives's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: my mother's basement
Posts: 531
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
HoffaLives is on a distinguished road
I feel so much better now. The wife gave me my shot and everything is turned around. I don't know what's in it, but it sure does the trick.

And the degree of support I've found here doesn't hurt, either. And no, I wasn't offended at all, that's just my Walter Mitty complex showing through. My real name is Norton and I'm a short pale Jewish chap that lives with his mom. All bluster if you get me.

One thing I notice in these posts is folks really aren't coming clean about where they are at; Are most liveaboards really well-heeled suburbanites slumming? If so guys like me would really like to know. I chose the lifestyle for many reasons, not least of which is I want to live free and thet means inexpensively; as someone observed, the more dough involved in anything, the less freedom accompanies it UNLESS YOU GOTS LOTS OF DOUGH.

Getting back to the original intent of this thread, I'm still thinking that as an alternative, inexpensive way of sheltering yourself, owning a well put together sailboat is probably not the best way to go. There are many, many boats that are worth far, far less, and yet would actually give you more when tied to a dock. One of my neighbors has a wonderful old fishboat hull that he built a small house on. It looks sweet, comfortable, and homey. He needs to tow it when he moves, but he never moves (which is interesting given that the harbour is a no discharge area).

And as for sailboats for cruising, there are some wonderfully inexpensive, well-built small boats that "can take you anywhere," boats that you might not even bother insuring. I wouldn't want to liveaboard one though.

Where th $$$ seems to come in is when you want a nice boat that functions well as a liveaboard and that you could also sail to Hawaii.

Basically, the more you ask from your boat, the more responsibility it entails., the more $$$ required.

I have a wonderful boat, but sometimes I look wistfully at the deranged hermit living aboard the disintegrating, listing scow that hasn't moved since WWII. You can bet he doesn't worry about coming up with 15 grand for the insurance company. No, he spends his days worrying about aliens from space, which as it should be.

I think I would be happy floating in an upside down bus, but then the wife comes into the mix; for her I would move ashore in a heartbeat.

Hell, I could live in a garbage can, popping up now and then to yell at the neighbors.

I'm thinking there might be a book in ghis, something I haven't read in anything about living afloat - what your money gets you. From a floating reef to a megayacht, what lifestyle you can expect with such and such $$$ and income. If I had that from the start I wouldn't be scratching my head right now.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #23  
Old 10-06-2007
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Seaside, Florida
Posts: 3,326
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
sailhog has a spectacular aura about sailhog has a spectacular aura about
Hoffa,
I'm a more than a little confused by your story... but let me add a couple of things based on personal experience. I just bought a boat, and it's a ten-minute bicycle ride away. The reason I bring this little fact up is because I have it on good evidence that this helps keep catastrophic damage to a minimum. I can and do check on her often. Don't know where you live relative to your boat, but there you go...

One more point about "sucking it up." You'll have to this time, but I'm convinced that this sailing/cruising thing can be done very very inexpensively. You aren't going to be nearly as comfortable while doing it, but being physically uncomfortable and at ease in your head -- simultaneously -- is what it's all about.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #24  
Old 10-06-2007
Valiente's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Toronto
Posts: 5,491
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Valiente has a spectacular aura about Valiente has a spectacular aura about
Quote:
Originally Posted by HoffaLives View Post
One thing I notice in these posts is folks really aren't coming clean about where they are at; Are most liveaboards really well-heeled suburbanites slumming? If so guys like me would really like to know. I chose the lifestyle for many reasons, not least of which is I want to live free and thet means inexpensively; as someone observed, the more dough involved in anything, the less freedom accompanies it UNLESS YOU GOTS LOTS OF DOUGH.
I am a self-employed urbanite who paid off his house in eight years by never taking a vacation, using the same 1992 TV with rabbit ears and by not driving a car. I then used the house for a fresh $200,000 mortgage to pay for a 40 foot cruiser plus enough money to reno the house for two pairs of tenants, who will pay down the mortgage (and pay for our diesel) while we cruise. I'll work while I'm gone for a five-year (hopefully) circ; I'll sell the boat when I return (in Europe, because they live proven steel boats), and I'll never retire because I don't have a pension and the demographics will look pretty ugly by 2026, anyway....so I'm taking my retirement in my late 40s with my wife and kid while I can.

It's doable if you can exercise discipline and stick to your goals. Job 1 is simply not spending money on crap: we did five years of double mortgage payments while having a single pair of tenants in order to be in a position to use an appreciating shack in an up market to capture the increase. If the boat itself is paid for, that's half the battle, because boat loans are crazy.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #25  
Old 10-06-2007
Valiente's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Toronto
Posts: 5,491
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Valiente has a spectacular aura about Valiente has a spectacular aura about
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailhog View Post
Hoffa,
I'm a more than a little confused by your story... but let me add a couple of things based on personal experience. I just bought a boat, and it's a ten-minute bicycle ride away. The reason I bring this little fact up is because I have it on good evidence that this helps keep catastrophic damage to a minimum. I can and do check on her often. Don't know where you live relative to your boat, but there you go...

One more point about "sucking it up." You'll have to this time, but I'm convinced that this sailing/cruising thing can be done very very inexpensively. You aren't going to be nearly as comfortable while doing it, but being physically uncomfortable and at ease in your head -- simultaneously -- is what it's all about.
I agree with Mr. Hog. As stated above, I have no car; however, I do have a bike and various trailers able to carry all manner of boat gear such as sailbags, fenders, cradle pads, even whisker poles if lashed right and tipped with a red rag... So when I *don't* have the trailer on, it's actually a pleasure to cycle 15 minutes or so down to the club to double-check chafe gear, redeploy fenders and make sure I haven't left something on deck that could leave in a blow. I do this because I'm at a finger end and because I nearly chafed through a bowline once: if the boat had gone, it would have piled into a line of another club's boats on the beam after a 100 metre sprint. So now I check. Proximity to my house is the main reason I picked the club.

The second point is also valid. After initial expenses to achieve a pleasant and safe life on the hook is established, you can stash a 200-DVD library of movie classics, carry around 100 sailing books and 100 tradeable paperbacks, learn to become a better cook, learn marlinespike seamanship and make nautical crafts, sew sails or fish from the taff rail. You can row to and from other people's boats and get free liquor for oil changes or simple things that older and perhaps arthritic sailors can't manage easily anymore. You can go exploring out of the tourist zones. Very little of this sort of life is expensive, and it certainly needn't be monotonous.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #26  
Old 10-07-2007
poopdeckpappy's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: San Diego
Posts: 5,538
Thanks: 23
Thanked 38 Times in 32 Posts
Rep Power: 10
poopdeckpappy has a spectacular aura about poopdeckpappy has a spectacular aura about
Hoffa, I think I'm a well done, slightly on the burnt side suburbanite.

The only thing we kept from our 30 yr accumalation fest was 3 boxes of clothes, my wifes XK8, my Titan truck and my job that I've had for the last 27 yrs.

This lifestyle is something we have dreamed about off and on for our entire married life, ( even longer for me ) but never thought life would take us on the detours nor test us the way it has, I honestly think we have past another level in the game and this is what we have unlocked, I'm sure the next level will be every bit as mysterious with all the setbacks and trials as the previous ones, but I do look forward to whatever we unlock next.

Who knows, maybe it's will be a lower Lattitude or maybe it will be game over...............we'll never know till we get there
__________________
1978 Tayana 37

Freedom comes when youíre ready to sail away. True freedom comes when you donít have to return


Cut off from the land that bore us, betrayed by the land we find, where the brightest have gone before us and the dullest remain behind, .......but stand to your glasses, steady,.......tis all we have left to prize, raise a cup to the dead already, hurrah for the next that dies
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #27  
Old 10-08-2007
RandyonR3's Avatar
Cruising
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: crusing
Posts: 146
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
RandyonR3 is on a distinguished road
A lot to learn

Sounds like you've already made up your mind, and I hate to say this, but maybe you don't have what it takes to be a cruiser, and what you dont realize is you dont have to have money.
The first thing you have to learn is that if you dont have a big bank roll, you'll have to do most of the work yourself.
I was talking to the wife this morning, the bottom paint around the waterline is starting to show blue. (blue was a guide coat of bottom paint I applied the last time I did a bottom job- about four years ago)over the blue, I applied red--when the blue shows through, put more red on.
Anyway, I'll be taking the boat up the slough to a sandy beach I spotted a while back. We'll ease her into the sand bank as the tide starts going out. we've only got about 3 feet of tide so I figure a foot or so should do it.. as she lays over and the waterline comes out of the water, we paint it... pretty simple, and we've just saved the money for a haul-out. and my boat, its a FIRST 42 from Beneteau.
Your boat as ours and many outhers, is in constant need of repair, of some kind.. either varnish, sanding, repairing or just cleaning up. Hoses break, pumps go bad, Dock lines wear out, and crap get caught in the prop.. Its all part of the boating life..
I've got a maxie prop in my boat, and while cruising in the north-west, I hooked a Crab Pot and wound the line around the prop. So I tossed out the anchor, got the swim fins and mask out and a good sharp knife and put up with the cold water for a few minutes.. after a hot shower, I was good as new, with another story to tell.
As I said, some people dont have what it takes, and some do, The mantaince and repair are all part of the cruising lifestyle, And I think its the pride knowing that keeping your boat in top condition while cruising is a great part of the satisfaction.
And I'll close with this last remark.. we all call it cruising when in reality it should be call " Repairing your boat in Exotic Ports"
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #28  
Old 10-08-2007
HoffaLives's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: my mother's basement
Posts: 531
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
HoffaLives is on a distinguished road
I suspect that the implied arrogance of "don't have what it takes" is unintentional, and to deprive others of their sadistic joy at the resulting blood fest, I'll spit out that bait and let it rot on the bottom like it deserves.

Having said that, I know all about do-it yerself maintenance, and have spent untold dozens of hours on rigging, plumbing, electrical, heating, propane system and engine. When the stern tube snapped I wrapped that sucker with two layers of mat and three cloth, and it took us as far as we needed to. But the hull is also cracked, and while I could patch it myself, below waterline fiberglass repairs of structural components is not something I want to bugger with. I am thinking of taking some courses, but there is a four year apprenticeship in composite repair for a reason.
Besides, there are too many sins out there hidden in bottom paint for the next guy to do properly and I don't want to be part of it.

Maintenance items that you list are in fact quite unremarkable and most dudes do it themselves. But replacing a section of hull and stern tube? If a guy does that kind of work and isn't a journeyman glasser, unless you never leave the dock, I think you are taking too great a risk with people's lives.

If it's just your life that's your call as long as they have a good bouy to mark where you went down so I don't tangle with your mast at low tide.

I've always done all my own work on everything from houses to cars to boats and I guess I'm passed the point of "satisfaction" in that. I know I can do it, big deal; it's just another job to do. And I know when the specialised knowledge required isn't worth my effort to learn as well. That's why I have insurance.

The whole point to this thread however (for me) was about separating fact from fiction about the lifestyle of the cruiser. And nobody told me about the 15 grand I would have to cough up if a caught a rope on a prop.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #29  
Old 10-08-2007
poopdeckpappy's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: San Diego
Posts: 5,538
Thanks: 23
Thanked 38 Times in 32 Posts
Rep Power: 10
poopdeckpappy has a spectacular aura about poopdeckpappy has a spectacular aura about
Quote:
Originally Posted by HoffaLives View Post

The whole point to this thread however (for me) was about separating fact from fiction about the lifestyle of the cruiser. And nobody told me about the 15 grand I would have to cough up if a caught a rope on a prop.
How could you or anyboby else know that you would one day run over a dock line, let alone know it would be a $15,000 ticket

That would be like Mac & Muffy Graham, knowing in 1964 that their life long sailing dream would end in their murder on a desert island in the South Pacific in 1974.

The fact is, you could have just as easy had $15,000.00 in unexpected damages done to your house that was not covered by your homeowners policy
__________________
1978 Tayana 37

Freedom comes when youíre ready to sail away. True freedom comes when you donít have to return


Cut off from the land that bore us, betrayed by the land we find, where the brightest have gone before us and the dullest remain behind, .......but stand to your glasses, steady,.......tis all we have left to prize, raise a cup to the dead already, hurrah for the next that dies
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #30  
Old 10-08-2007
poopdeckpappy's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: San Diego
Posts: 5,538
Thanks: 23
Thanked 38 Times in 32 Posts
Rep Power: 10
poopdeckpappy has a spectacular aura about poopdeckpappy has a spectacular aura about
Quote:
Originally Posted by HoffaLives View Post

The whole point to this thread however (for me) was about separating fact from fiction about the lifestyle of the cruiser. And nobody told me about the 15 grand I would have to cough up if a caught a rope on a prop.
How could you or anyboby else know that you would one day run over a dock line, let alone know it would be a $15,000 ticket

That would be like Mac & Muffy Graham, knowing in 1964 that their life long sailing dream would end in their murder on a desert island in the South Pacific in 1974.

The fact is, you could have just as easy had $15,000.00 in unexpected damages done to your house that was not covered by your homeowners policy
__________________
1978 Tayana 37

Freedom comes when youíre ready to sail away. True freedom comes when you donít have to return


Cut off from the land that bore us, betrayed by the land we find, where the brightest have gone before us and the dullest remain behind, .......but stand to your glasses, steady,.......tis all we have left to prize, raise a cup to the dead already, hurrah for the next that dies
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:12 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.