How do people do their water? - Page 2 - SailNet Community
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post #11 of 23 Old 12-06-2007
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I run 2 tanks and fill from the dock side and rotate from one to the other every 2 weeks or so (shower in the marina) but the guy on the other side of the dock plugs in direct, never shuts off the feed and has almost sunk his boat twice this year as a result

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post #12 of 23 Old 12-06-2007
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This consternation with shore water hook-ups always seems ironic to me. If done and maintained properly, a boat's potable water plumbing should be as secure, if not more so, than that in our homes, particularly when you consider most homeowners virtually never inspect their plumbing. When I hear third person accounts of problems like a boat "almost sinking" ,whatever thant means, I can't help but conclude it's either untrue, poor maintenance or poor installation.
How many people shut off their residential supply when they leave the house? A flooded basement is often more expensive than a flooded or sunk boat
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post #13 of 23 Old 12-06-2007
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Soldered copper plumbing secured to a solid home is a lot different than flexable hose attached with hose clamps exposed to salt air, vibration & flexing.
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post #14 of 23 Old 12-06-2007
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I agree with you but the relative age of each also has a derogatory effect - the avg home age vs. boat...
I must admit I also turn off the shore water when away.
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post #15 of 23 Old 12-25-2007
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Pressure regulator

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This consternation with shore water hook-ups always seems ironic to me. If done and maintained properly, a boat's potable water plumbing should be as secure, if not more so, than that in our homes, particularly when you consider most homeowners virtually never inspect their plumbing. When I hear third person accounts of problems like a boat "almost sinking" ,whatever thant means, I can't help but conclude it's either untrue, poor maintenance or poor installation.
How many people shut off their residential supply when they leave the house? A flooded basement is often more expensive than a flooded or sunk boat
Dockside pressure regulators are prone to failure. They WILL fill your boat up with water if the pressure is left on. So we do not use one. We have one if anyone out there wants one - pay the shipping and you can have it. But I don't recommend the use of one.

Our system is 220 gallons (1,000 liters) and we fill up about once a week (4 of us with ALL amenities including a washing machine) when tied up. When we are out and about, we can make that last as long as we need it to - we haven't had to fill up away from the dock yet...

Our previous boat (Grampian 26) has 16 gallons of water and we made that last 2 weeks. When I was by myself and living on the Grampian I went through it in about the same 2 week period. Only using it for dishes drinking and cleaning.

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post #16 of 23 Old 12-25-2007
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I don't recommend leaving the dock water hose connected to the boat, even if you have that as an option. There is just too much that can go wrong. If you burst a hose inside the boat, having the boat hooked up to the shore water system will pretty much sink your boat. If the boat's pressure water system isn't hooked up to shore water, then the most water it can dump into the bilge is the contents of your water tank—which is usually less than 100 gallons.

Think about it... if you have the hose connected to the shore water and something does burst, instead of 3.5 gpm or so for 20 minutes, you have it for however long it takes for someone to realize what is going on and turn off the water faucet. I'd rather not worry about that... so I fill the tank and then turn off the water.

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post #17 of 23 Old 12-25-2007
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The fundamental issue here is whether or not people choose to live the camping lifestyle while aboard or would prefer more comfortable living such as an endless supply of potable water which I'd venture to say none of us would do without at home. Living aboard should not have to be that much different and with prudent management of shore water, proper maintenance and some common sense, it doesn't have to be.
The pressure regulator is there to protect the boat's system from infrequent high surges of pressure resulting in over-pressurization and consequential destruction of the system. The unllikley (but possible) failure of a regulator should not deter anyone from using a properly functioning regulator as without one, the system is more likely to suffer a surge and failure.

I think if I were the type to leave the water on, I'd invest in a cheap pressure-sensitive automatic shutoff commonly available for cheap which would shut the water off if/when there was no back-pressure which would obviate the possibility of flooding if someone forgets to shut off the valve when the boat is unattended.

Last edited by k1vsk; 12-25-2007 at 09:44 PM.
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post #18 of 23 Old 12-25-2007
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I'm not talking about a pressure regulator failure. Any failure in the pressure water system could lead to the vessel sinking. Turning the water off is far safer than relying on any device.

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The fundamental issue here is whether or not people choose to live the camping lifestyle while aboard or would prefer more comfortable living such as an endless supply of potable water which I'd venture to say none of us would do without at home. Living aboard should not have to be that much different and with prudent management of shore water, proper maintenance and some common sense, it doesn't have to be.
The pressure regulator is there to protect the boat's system from infrequent high surges of pressure resulting in over-pressurization and consequential destruction of the system. The unllikley (but possible) failure of a regulator should not deter anyone from using a properly functioning regulator as without one, the system is more likely to suffer a surge and failure.

I think if I were the type to leave the water on, I'd invest in a cheap pressure-sensitive automatic shutoff commonly available for cheap which would shut the water off if/when there was no back-pressure which would obviate the possibility of flooding if someone forgets to shut off the valve when the boat is unattended.

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post #19 of 23 Old 12-25-2007
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I get a shot of single malt, pass a tumbler of water overhead and whisper water very softly, tossing it over my left shoulder. Then drink the scotch.

Jerry

I knew that eventually we would have to agree on something JL.

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post #20 of 23 Old 12-25-2007
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When we are living on board , which is not I emphasise a permanent situation at the moment, we are rarely tied up to a dock so we live on tank water and have to conserve. Nonetheless, if you look after your supply, navy showers and all that, it's amazing how long the tanks will last. We carry 400 litres.

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