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Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Cruising & Liveaboard Forum > Living Aboard
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  #11  
Old 12-22-2007
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I'm diggin' the threads, Hoffa. Congrats on your sail. Your concerns regarding the danger you put your home in while out sailing are quite understandable, even for those of us who don't live on our boats, yet. I remember a passage from one of Lin and Larry's books I read a while ago, and for me to remember anything it has to make quite an impression: they chose to live and sail on their boat and promised themselves they wouldn't be its slaves. While they would do everything in their power to make it safe and seaworthy, ultimately, it is just a vessel from which to experience life. I like this philosophy very much.
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  #12  
Old 01-07-2008
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Hoffa,

I understand the trepidation of the loss of a boat, but living aboard and losing your home is the quid pro quo. Your boat’s your home, you take it with you to experience life on the water, different than the life ashore.

You’ll run aground and learn from the grounding, you sail at night and acquire that skill too, you come to a marina or unfamiliar dock and lose reserves and that to you’ll learn to deal with, it’s all part of sailing and the life on the water.

At least its not a glass house…
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  #13  
Old 01-07-2008
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chucklesR is a jewel in the rough chucklesR is a jewel in the rough chucklesR is a jewel in the rough
I've said it before:
"if you want to fly a hull - fly a hobie, not a home"

I don't live aboard, but my boat cost more than my first and second homes combined. I don't risk it for pleasure sails, even if insurance is going to replace most of it, I don't need the emotional pain. I'm also not the kind of guy that sledgehammers out my own wall when I want to add to a family room.
Do I take it out and sail, heck ya, even solo - do I go to places I've never been and bounce around a little, heck ya, even solo. Fly a hull? no. Go out by choice in Force 6, no.
Do I know how? unqualified Yes - via charter's using other peoples homes, not mine; and sailing school (winds 35kt and up the week I went).

If you want to test your self, do it in on someone elses boat.
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  #14  
Old 01-07-2008
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sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
I don't see going out in Force 6 winds as a big problem... it's only winds in the 22-27 knot range... which is a lot of good sailing... Of course, down on the Chesapeake, it is a bit different, due to the shallow nature of the water there and all.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #15  
Old 01-07-2008
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It gets choppy as hell, massive 3 and 4 foot wind waves with rollers all around -with only 15 - 20 inches under the cockpit the Gemini's slam. It makes my drink almost spill (the liquid inside moved once on a really bad wave) and frightfull noises that my iPod can't overcome.

Besides, I would have to learn to reef

I can make 14 kts in 20 kts of wind, who needs the other 2 knts.

for real, It's good sailing, but not singlehanding - I've probably sailed less time than Hoffa
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  #16  
Old 01-07-2008
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Things to ponder....

We hope to pull pitch in four or five years, sell the house and cruise for a few years. At that point, we'll be travelling in our only home and it'll be interesting to see if it changes the way we sail. I kind of hope not, but I can see where you might want to do a more serious risk assessment before pulling anchor.

Dave
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  #17  
Old 01-07-2008
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Dunlookn has a little shameless behaviour in the past
There were times in far-off-lands when I had brave men and millions of dollars of equipment I was responsible for. The men trusted me with thier lives. The Army trusted me with the equipment.

Fast forward...I have the boat I dreamed of all those nights in Iraq. I am with blessed with the children I really never expected to see.

Each time I have left the dock in the past, I worry. I balance my skills against thier safety. My passion against common sense.

I sail alone easily. On other people's boats even easier. With my children (and my significant other) on board the sum total of my life, my heart, and my soul look to me to keep them safe.

I have never felt a greater responsibility.

Of course, I am concerned.

I check my boat.

Smile at my crew.

Cast off the lines,

...and make the memories my children will tell my great-grandchildren about long after the X-Box has been replaced by another peice of useless technology.
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  #18  
Old 01-09-2008
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I'm a liveaboard and regretfuly, I don't take my boat out as much as I like. I own my own company and run the marina where I stay. I'd love to finish the day and take her out or maybe even take a few days and go out, but I don't. I'm too busy or tired. After a long day, it comforts me to take a shower, cook a nice dinner with my girlfriend, and relax on my boat and watch a movie or something. I enjoy just spending time here.

I do get out once in a while. I even take a trip now and then. but not often enough.

This is pretty much how most of my livaboard friends are...

Its not that we're scared. Its more that we're tired from our jobs. We work too much. If I was that scared of doing damage I would never take a boat out. Ever. When I go out I'm always careful. I'd never want to damage a boat.
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