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Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Cruising & Liveaboard Forum > Living Aboard
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  #11  
Old 09-17-2008
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thanks for the suggestion of tidewater yacht agency. it looks pretty good. i looked at the "rates" page and for a 1-3 month transient stay, it came out to $350 per month for 27 feet. i didn't see a price for long term live aboards though. maybe i'll give them a call in a few days. research has been put on the back burner seeing as i have a chem test tomarow.

and thanks for the reality check on the cost of living chuckles. i've considered most of those already, but i wasn't aware of the insurance costs. i'll have to look into the different coverages available. if it were a car, i'd definitely be going for liability. i basically just want to be covered in a lightning strike if that is an option.

Last edited by KasbeKZ; 09-17-2008 at 04:52 PM. Reason: part left out
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  #12  
Old 09-17-2008
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it looks a long way away on google earth, but map quest says 15 minutes. probably without traffic. or maybe a new bridge has been put in since google was updated. thanks for the suggestion. i'll be running over there next week to see what the deal is

Last edited by KasbeKZ; 09-17-2008 at 05:04 PM.
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  #13  
Old 09-18-2008
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New liveaboard questions...

Hello All,

So glad to find other lunatics who live on thier boats in cold climates! I just bought a Pacific Seacraft, Crealock 37, nice boat, NO HEAT; unless you count that Force 10 (otherwise known as the "fireplace"). I like breathing oxygen so I'm considering electric CERAMIC radiant heat. Any feed back out there??? Some sources say a ducted forced hot air system is really better to reduce the condensation and heat the area along the hull (inside the storage areas of the setees, ect)? Talk to me people, I'd love to hear from someone north of SC, USA!!! I'm in Rhode Island and may have to shovel snow off my dock in Jan & Feb. Anybody using heat tape on thier water lines? Does it work in Feb? Running water will be a luxury this winter but ANY advice on this system is appreciated. I'm just bought this boat so I need to insulate it too...suggestions??

Thanks in advance...Bethann
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  #14  
Old 09-18-2008
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If you're talking an AC powered ceramic radiant heater, I'd say don't do it. They're a fairly dangerous fire hazard. If you need to go with AC-powered heat, I'd recommend the larger oil-filled radiator type heaters. They're far safer, especially on a tippy boat.

As for forced hot air—those systems are pretty good, like Webasto, but require regular maintenance and fueling, which a AC-powered oil-radiator isn't going to require. An electric powered heater is also going to be a much drier form of heat as a general rule, compared to LPG, Diesel or Kerosene fueled heaters, since there is no combustion process going on. Adding fans to what ever system you use is a good idea to circulate air through all the lockers and such.

Never heard of using heat tape on the water lines.. wouldn't recommend doing it either.

As for insulating the boat, if the boat has removable ceilings and overheads, it would be well worth filling any such space behind them with foam insulation and a mylar radiant heat barrier film. This would seriously increase the insulation value without adding too much weight or bulk.
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailorgirl60 View Post
Hello All,

So glad to find other lunatics who live on thier boats in cold climates! I just bought a Pacific Seacraft, Crealock 37, nice boat, NO HEAT; unless you count that Force 10 (otherwise known as the "fireplace"). I like breathing oxygen so I'm considering electric CERAMIC radiant heat. Any feed back out there??? Some sources say a ducted forced hot air system is really better to reduce the condensation and heat the area along the hull (inside the storage areas of the setees, ect)? Talk to me people, I'd love to hear from someone north of SC, USA!!! I'm in Rhode Island and may have to shovel snow off my dock in Jan & Feb. Anybody using heat tape on thier water lines? Does it work in Feb? Running water will be a luxury this winter but ANY advice on this system is appreciated. I'm just bought this boat so I need to insulate it too...suggestions??

Thanks in advance...Bethann
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
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her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #15  
Old 09-18-2008
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We've been living aboard since 15 April in Jersey City NJ and MV during the summer until Labor Day. We generally haul in early December. Learned the following:
SD is right about the insulation and the fans - I'd add that you can get rigid foam insulation and cut it to hatch size and portlight size and save a lot of heat. I second the oil filled radiators if you have a/c. We've found that forced hot air from a reverse cycle air conditioning system can't extract significant heat from the water around the boat in the Northeast winter.

And it is hard to keep decks, piers and docks shoveled off and clear of the ice, frozen slush and hardpack that builds up under snow. On the other hand, if you accept global warming, it may be balmy in RI this winter?
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  #16  
Old 09-18-2008
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sailingdog, aren't you the one that told me not to threadjack on one of my first posts? just wondering what i did wrong and sailorgirl didn't....

camaraderie, i called up tidewater yacht agency, and all they would say is that they are filled up and not taking any new renters and aren't expecting to. it's disappointing, because from what they said on their website, i was looking at $350 a month there. that would have been AWESOME. but i'll probably give a call back about every month to see what's changed. thanks again for the suggestion. that place is nice, and only 15 minutes away!
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  #17  
Old 09-18-2008
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KasbeKZ-

AFAICT, SailorGirl's post is pretty much on topic when it comes to living aboard a boat... and probably relevant to you, if you were to choose to liveaboard a boat.

Your opening post is about making the decision whether to live aboard a boat or get an apartment. Last I checked, you're going to have to heat a boat if you're living on it, since, even in Norfolk, Virginia, you still get snow and relatively cold weather in the winter. BTW, I lived in Norther Virginia for seven years and my in-laws live in the Tidewater region of Virginia, so I am pretty familiar with the weather conditions down there.

A boat that isn't insulated is going to be pretty miserable to liveaboard, and trying to heat it with a diesel, kerosene, or propane heater, when dockside AC shorepower is an option, is a bad idea IMHO. Electric heat is safer than combustion-based heating processes in a small boat, since there is no risk of CO poisoning, and a much lower risk of fire, especially if you're using the oil-filled radiator style heaters.

BTW, you're referring to the Winter Liveaboard thread, where you asked:

Quote:
Originally Posted by KasbeKZ View Post
here's a noob question. i hear a lot of talk about diesel heaters and such being used on these boats. what size diesel heater may be appropriate for a 27-30 ft boat in the Chesapeake area? also, what about the positioning of the heater and protecting the surroundings from getting too hot? i wouldn't want to catch it on fire... would this heater just be sat right in the middle of the salon, or would it hang?
IMHO, your post wasn't so much about winter liveaboard but about sizing and installing a heater, which wasn't really on the topic of living aboard a boat in the winter, but more a gear and maintenance issue.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
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Last edited by sailingdog; 09-18-2008 at 05:21 PM.
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  #18  
Old 09-18-2008
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ok i understand. it wasn't a real complaint, i was just wondering what you were basing these instructions on
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  #19  
Old 09-18-2008
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Umm... my twisted interpretation of the world as I see it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by KasbeKZ View Post
ok i understand. it wasn't a real complaint, i was just wondering what you were basing these instructions on


BTW, keep on top of the Tidewater yacht agency, since things can change pretty quickly....
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Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #20  
Old 09-18-2008
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will do. thanks much.
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